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Old 06-14-2008, 10:42 AM   #1 (permalink)
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1996 Fuel Leak- Pictured

I could use some help, I have never worked on the fuel system. I attached a picture so you can see what I am talking about. The filter assembly is not leaking, it is the device behind it that is leaking pretty badly. First of all, what is it? Looks like it goes from the filter through this thing, then metal lines take it to the block. I am not sure if i will need to replace the entire piece or just maybe an o-ring or something. I had some fuel lines replaced about a year ago and was charged rediculos prices--trying to keep from that again. Thanks for any help.
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Old 06-14-2008, 11:43 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rski stroke View Post
I could use some help, I have never worked on the fuel system. I attached a picture so you can see what I am talking about. The filter assembly is not leaking, it is the device behind it that is leaking pretty badly. First of all, what is it? Looks like it goes from the filter through this thing, then metal lines take it to the block. I am not sure if i will need to replace the entire piece or just maybe an o-ring or something. I had some fuel lines replaced about a year ago and was charged ridiculous prices--trying to keep from that again. Thanks for any help.
That is the lift pump (fuel pump). If it is leaking you will need to replace it. I would also get the gaskets for the banjo nut and replace those also. If you are not sure it is the fuel pump or the banjo nut gaskets then clean up the area the best you can and tie a dry rag around the banjo nut and go for a short 10-15 minute drive. Inspect the rag...if it is dry then most likely the fuel pump is leaking. Here is an excellent article by Sam Miller on how to replace the fuel pump:
FUEL PUMP REPLACEMENT by Sam Miller

I recommend disconnecting batteries. There is no way to work around the glow plug relay without touching it. Then set up a parts tray, run a good light, throw a pad over the radiator and go for it.

Also, if you have a HPX crossover hose installed, it is easier if you disconnect it from the passenger side oil rail and tie it out of the way. Remove “Y” pipe (compressor manifold) from turbo, taking care not to lose the rubber O-ring inside the fitting (Marmon clamp). If you loosen only the lower clamps on the two silicone hoses the whole assembly can be removed easily and set aside. Cover the openings with rags or plastic wrap and secure with rubber bands.

Draining the fuel filter/water separator canister. You will want to either place a container under the vehicle to catch the diesel (a hose pushed on to the drain tube sure prevents a mess), or pump the canister dry once you get the filter out, in which case you won’t slide the yellow lever to “DRAIN.” This is a good occasion to inspect and clean the interior of the canister, so removal of the filter and heater is advised. (Remember, the plastic heater standpipe is LEFT HAND THREADS.) A 7/8” crow’s foot wrench works best, but I have loosened it with a regular open-end wrench. Pull off the heater wire connector with needle-nose pliers. Now you can clean the canister and check for cracks or leaks. You’ll be amazed at the crud in there.

Disconnecting hoses. There are two hoses connected to the top of the pump and one at the bottom. The two top hoses are protected by a removable clip-on heat shield (just yank it off). You can only get to the clamp on the pump side of that bottom hose. And finally, the water drain hose at the front passenger side of the filter housing.

Remove the two bolts attaching the fuel pressure regulator with 10mm and carefully pry it back from the filter housing, taking care not to lose the O-ring. Good time to clean the screen and examine condition of O-ring. There is also a short section of 5/16” hose that may need to be replaced.

Separate the wire harness connector on the passenger side of canister and remove positioning clamp with 8mm. It will NOT slide off the tongue of the clamp as you think it might, since the tongue is barbed. (Remind you of anyone?)

Disconnect wires connected to the canister, two on drivers side, one at bottom rear. (So now you want to know what they are? Aw geez, you’re one of THOSE guys: Oh, all right: On the driver’s side, the top connector on the side of the Water Filter/Water Separator Assembly is the fuel heater connection; the connector directly beneath it links to the Water Sensor; and the connector on the bottom rear of the Assembly is for the filter restriction sensor. I believe it is a vacuum switch. Note: In 1996 the fuel filter restriction sensor was moved to the fuel pressure regulator, driver’s side of filter housing. Happy now?)

To continue: Two bolts holding down the filter canister are 13mm. You can lift the whole filter assembly up and forward out of the way with the long blue hose still connected at the bottom.

Getting the pump out is not difficult, using a 1 1/4 inch box end wrench, heated and bent to clear the turbo pedestal, while removing the large banjo bolt. You just have to be patient and content with getting only small incremental turns on it. It takes a while. The two metal ring-gaskets will sometimes remain stuck to the banjo fitting. You can remove them once the pump is out of the way. You do not have to remove or loosen the fuel supply tubes connected to the banjo fitting.

At this point, I advise examining your new pump to see how the tappet connects. This will help you visualize how careful you must be so you don’t lose the tappet in the process of removing the pump. It is not necessarily fatal if that happens, but it is very disconcerting to lose the tappet into the bowels of the engine. If you can’t retrieve it, then it will probably wind up in the oil pan.

Now, remove the two 10 mm bolts holding down the pump and prepare to carefully remove the pump from the crankcase bore. Be careful here so as not to lose the tappet into the cam crankcase. If you want to assure that the tappet will not be lost, you can turn the engine over by hand until the cam lobe that contacts the tappet rotates to the top. It will actually push the pump upward if the retaining bolts are removed. With careful twisting and pulling you will eventually be able to lift the pump straight up and out of the engine. If the tappet comes with it, then I advise a high-five or fist-pump or maybe even a celebratory beverage.

Cover or stuff a rag into the pump hole and it's a good time to clean the entire valley. Kind of like being on a treasure hunt, you'll be amazed at what you find down there; valve caps, wire ends, wedding rings, cat hair, baseball gloves, wrenches... It's a lot of fun getting back all your tools.

Check out the exterior of the fuel filter canister. Clean the three wire terminals, check for leaks or cracks and clean everything so if a leak shows up later you'll know exactly where it originates.

Time to put things back together. Remove the two metal banjo gaskets if you haven't already. You might need a knife blade to get them loose. Be sure the interior of the banjo fitting is clean and free of debris.

Hoses: I got 3/8 inch 400 psi diesel-approved fuel hose from NAPA by the foot (by the inch, actually) and simply cut new hoses to match the old ones, three altogether on the pump and a 5/16 inch hose on the regulator. I installed them at this point, along with the clamps. I recommend tightening the clamps just enough so they are "pre-positioned." When the time comes to give them a final set it makes it easier not to have to chase them around with two hands. (One exception: the hose clamp on the bottom of the filter assembly must be tightened completely. You just can’t get to it once everything else is in place.)

If nothing fell into the hole or onto the cam then lower the new pump and tappet. I use a little anti-seize on the housing, thinking it might make removal next time a little easier. Grease should already be on the O ring, but if not, I'd grease it. Tighten the bolts carefully to secure the pump. Make sure the pump does not get in a bind. Just tighten the bolts evenly and it should go into the bore ok, regardless of where the cam eccentric is positioned.

The hardest part of the whole operation, for me at least, was getting the banjo bolt restarted. You will quickly come to understand why the shop manual calls for removal of the turbo pedestal for this operation. (Plus, more shop time equals more money. duh!) You will wish you had a Dremel tool and could cut away some of the "webbing" between the legs of the pedestal. It’s a bit of a struggle, figuring out how to position your hands and fingers for the most efficient way to start that large bolt.

Slide one new metal gasket onto the bolt, insert it into the banjo housing and have the second gasket ready to slide into the slot on the interior side of the fitting as you push the bolt in. It may take a couple of attempts to get that second gasket onto the bolt. Just be sure it doesn’t slide on through the fitting and disappear on top of the manifold beneath. You might even apply a small amount of RTV or some handy ickumpucky on it so it doesn’t sneak away so easily. Now you just have to carefully turn the bolt with some pressure behind it to "catch" the threads. Once it's started, then it is just a matter of wrenching it in, one tooth at a time. Here's where patience comes in again. It is a character-building exercise. Eventually you'll get it in. Snug it down, recheck the pump hold-down bolts for tightness and you're through the worst of it. Time for another congratulatory coffee break. Sometimes even an adult beverage is deservedly appropriate here…

Adjust all the hoses and be sure the clamps are on and positioned for easy access. (Once again, the lower hose will have to be clamped securely to the filter canister at this point since you won’t be able to reach it once the assembly is bolted down.) Lower the filter assembly back onto its pedestal, connecting the lower hose to the fuel pump as you go. Check that the wiring looms and connectors on both sides are positioned correctly. Adjust all three short hoses correctly and tighten the clamps. Remember to “aim” the clamps for easy access later, just in case there is a leak and you need to get to them with a screwdriver or ¼ inch socket. Don’t forget to reconnect the drain hose also. And CLOSE THE YELLOW WATER DRAIN LEVER.

Install the two 13mm bolts securing the filter housing (I use just a touch of anti-seize) and tighten. Plug in the three wire connectors to the canister and join the loom connectors on the passenger side. Reinstall the 8mm hold-down bracket. (or probably like most of us do, just wire-tie the connector to the GP loom).

Re-attach the FPR, being careful to install the O-ring. Tighten the two 10mm bolts evenly so the O-ring sets properly.

Reconnect HPX hose, the “Y” pipe (don’t forget the O-ring) and whatever else you might have removed or disconnected. It is a good time to also re-dry the manifold Valley of Death. Looking for leaks will be a lot easier if everything underneath starts out dry. A long screwdriver and some paper towels work great. Just be sure to get them all back out before you finish.

Check everything twice. Pry back up whatever wires and brackets and connectors and hoses you mashed down by lying on them. (If your A/C ever quits working, it is often the top electrical connector that has taken a beating from your body weight…) If it all looks good, reconnect the batteries and you are ready to start.

I leave the heat shield covering the two tops hoses off at this point, just so I can look for leaks after I fire it up. Don’t forget to eventually snap the shield back on, because there is a lot of heat back there and the hoses will definitely last longer.


A couple of notes here: If you shimmed the FPR, I would remove the shim at this point and start over with a stock set-up. Once you are up and running again, you can work the pressure back up towards the 70’s, using whatever shims work best.

A NOTE OF CAUTION: The FPR housing is very fragile. It is extremely easy to crack the housing by over tightening the Schrader valve or any fittings you might insert to accommodate a PSI gauge. BE VERY LIGHT ON THE TOUCH WHEN TIGHTENING ANYTHING INTO THE SCHRADER VALVE OPENING, especially tapered NPT fittings.

If everything is working ok, it should fire up within a few cranks. Thereafter, it takes a while to purge the air, usually a couple dozen miles of driving before things begin to settle back in to near normal.

WARNING: You will want to take a good light and look for leaks after the engine is running. BE CAREFUL. The fan and belt can change your nickname to Three-Fingered Jack in a heartbeat.

With any luck at all, you are dry as a bone and ready to roll. Check it again after your test-run.

Good luck,

Sam Miller
sellwithsam@hotmail.com

P.S. Feel free to email me with any suggestions, corrections or improvements to these instructions. Hopefully it will help a few other guys save a bunch of money by doing it themselves.
Here are some relevant Part Numbers:

PUMP: (sometimes referred to as a Lift Pump)

Ford number: F6TZ-9350-A
International number: 1824415C92
Master number for NAPA, Shucks, AutoZone, etc.: 61067

Banjo Gaskets (metal washers, two required):

Ford number: F4TZ-9A375-A
International number: 1820650C1

Fuel line O-ring: (rear of head, passenger side; F4TZ-9A387-A
just back of intake on valley side
of head, driver's side)
Hoses:

Ford and (Motorcraft) numbers:
Black hose, 1 required: F4TZ-9324-BA (KFL34)
Longer Blue hose, 1 required: F4TZ-9324-CA (KFL33)
Shorter Blue hoses, 2 required: F4TZ-9324-DA (KFL35)

Hose information for DIY:

Rated at 400 psi and ok for diesel fuel:

3/8” hoses: 2 required 2 “ (fuel tank to pump &
low pressure feed from filter to pump)
1 required 2 7/8” (fuel pump outlet to filter)
5/16” hoses: 1 required 1 ¾” (FPR tubing)
1 required 5” (if replacing drain hose)

Fuel Filter Heater: Ford F5TZ-9J294-A
International 1825186C91
External Connector F4TZ-9C065-A

Fuel Filter Lid – OEM International: 1825190C91

Crankcase Breather O-Rings:

Ford F4TZ-6769-A (small, seals screw head, 1/pack)
Ford F4TZ-6769-C (large, seals breather adapter to
International 1824452C2 valve cover, 2/pack)
International 1820784C2



Water Sensor Probe Ford# F4TZ-9S281-A

Fuel Filter Restriction Sensor: 1994/95-bottom of filter assembly; 1996/97-on fuel regulator.
Ford # E8TZ-9S283-A
International # 1809435C1

Fuel Pressure Regulator California Kit part number F6TZ-9K061-AA
FPR Spring International # 1825854C1 (CA)
FPR Screen International # 1823658C91
FPR Screen Ford # "Orifice Vent Kit" F5TZ-9A214-A
FPR Kit Ford # F6TZ-9157-BA

O-ring dimensions: Width: 1/16”; Diameter: 9/16”.

Turbo Y-Pipe O-Ring: Ford:F4TZ-9E436-A International: 1818372C1

Turbo Pedestal O-Rings: (between pedestal & block; pedestal & turbo)
Ford: F4TZ-6N653-A & F4TZ-6N653-B

Turbo Exhaust Up-Pipes: Ford: F4TZ-6K854-A (Driver side)

Ford: F6TZ-6K854-A (Passenger side)

Turbo Exhaust Collector Donut: (Top of each manifold to turbo up-pipe)

Ford: F4TZ-6K854-C


Oil Gallery Plug: International: 1822607C91 (O-Ring not sold separately)

IPR O-Ring Kit:
Ford: F6TZ-9C977-AN
International: 1825806C92



FUEL PUMP OPERATION


Fuel is drawn from the fuel tank by the diaphragm section of the fuel pump (top hose-driver’s side). The fuel pump circulates fuel at low pressure (approximately 3 to 10 psi), first through the fuel filter (top hose-passenger side) and then back to the second stage of the fuel pump (bottom hose from filter to pump).

During the second stage, the piston-actuated section of the fuel pump supplies fuel at a pressure of approximately 40 psi into the cylinder head fuel galleries.


Misc. International (Navistar) Part Numbers:

1825806C92 IPR reseal kit include the spacer, nut, and plug seal
1815874C1 ICP O-ring for HP hoses and oil gallery top plugs
1824452C2 CCV O-ring large
1820784C2 CCV O-ring small
1815560C1 Turbo to pedistal O-ring .421 x .560
1815561C1 Turbo to pedistal O-ring .769 x .908
1822740C1 Compressor outlet seal for turbo
1822749C1 Exhaust to flange seal for turbo
1822610C91 Aluminum Oil gallery drain plugs under the valve cover
1822618C91 Fuel drain plugs at the ends of the head
1827535C94 Gallery Rail End plug Kit. (Steel plug & blue coated seal ring).
1815923C92 Under valve cover harness
1818350C2 Valve cover gasket
1830829C91 Valve cover replacement connector shells (4 w/seals w/o pins)
1661875C1 Valve cover connector female pins w/o wire lead
2501055C1 Valve cover connector female pins w/ wire lead
1661872C1 Valve cover connector wire/pin seals
1821720C99 IPR 94-96 (below engine 375548)
1825899C93 IPR 97 (above engine 375548)


Joat’s PSD Part Numbers url:

http://www.thedwilsons.com/powerstroke/PSD_Part_Numbers.html

Good Luck,

Griz
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Old 06-14-2008, 11:54 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Just some moral support here. You can do this yourself, just take your time. Follow the instructions posted above. I have a 95 and have done this 3 - 4 times now.
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Old 06-14-2008, 01:14 PM   #4 (permalink)
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If that is a picture of your motor please cover the intake ports to the heads, stuff a rag in each hole or tape them up.
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Old 06-15-2008, 10:08 AM   #5 (permalink)
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okay so I changed the pump out yesterday BEFORE I was able to read Griz's response. Thank you for the article. I will be a pro pretty soon since I have to tear it all back apart. The banjo nut is leaking slightly, so I need new gaskets there. Then the fuel line on the bottom(from the filter) is leaking due to the hose clamp breaking when I tightened it. Putting that short fuel hose it was a real pain, so I am not looking forward to it. Since that hose is leaking, I have to pull everthing apart, back to square one. Was alittle upset yesterday; but now looking at it as experance.

On a side note, when I was trying to figure out what the pump was, I went to the dealership so they could bring up the drawing. I went ahead and bought the pump for 162.00 so I didnt have to make another trip (just in case). Then went to Autozone and bought it for $81. I am sure this surprises no one but what surprised me is that they are both the exact same Carter pump. No differences what so ever--just half the price.
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Old 06-15-2008, 11:20 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by rski stroke View Post
okay so I changed the pump out yesterday BEFORE I was able to read Griz's response. Thank you for the article. I will be a pro pretty soon since I have to tear it all back apart. The banjo nut is leaking slightly, so I need new gaskets there. Then the fuel line on the bottom(from the filter) is leaking due to the hose clamp breaking when I tightened it. Putting that short fuel hose it was a real pain, so I am not looking forward to it. Since that hose is leaking, I have to pull everthing apart, back to square one. Was alittle upset yesterday; but now looking at it as experance.

On a side note, when I was trying to figure out what the pump was, I went to the dealership so they could bring up the drawing. I went ahead and bought the pump for 162.00 so I didn't have to make another trip (just in case). Then went to Autozone and bought it for $81. I am sure this surprises no one but what surprised me is that they are both the exact same Carter pump. No differences what so ever--just half the price.
You are right...no surprise there on the price difference. I believe Carter is the only manufacture of these fuel pumps...not 100% positive on that but pretty sure. So no matter where you buy the fuel pump it'll be a made by Carter so just shop for the best price.

Griz
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Old 06-15-2008, 12:19 PM   #7 (permalink)
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One thing that I have noticed on the dealer vs aftermarket is that the dealer sometimes will be selling a new pump where the aftermarket one is rebuilt. That is one thing that you have to look at and consider.

Jim
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Old 06-15-2008, 02:20 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Can the Banjo bolt gaskets be replaced without doing removing the fuel pump? I have a similar small leak. I was hoping to do just the Banjo gaskets and see what happens.
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Old 06-16-2008, 11:04 AM   #9 (permalink)
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Yes you can, but be prepared to spend some time fighting to get it off and on. Once you figure out how to use your fingers in tight quarters, it is not to bad. You can do it, however you WILL use some choice words---or atleast I did! Review Griz's post also.
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Old 06-22-2008, 12:14 PM   #10 (permalink)
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I am at a loss......No idea what to do next. Fuel pump is still leaking.....and not from any of the 3 hoses. I had the problem and thought maybe the pump housing had a crack or malfunction of some sort. I took that pump back and got a new one.

Round two went so much more smoothly. I know that the 3 hoses nor the banjo fitting is leaking. It is easy to examine them with a mirror. I really feel that the diesel is coming from one of the holes manufactured in the pump. Anyone have in-sight that I may be overlooking?
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Old 06-22-2008, 12:49 PM   #11 (permalink)
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As a professional technician I would approach this methodically. I would begin by cleaning off the fuel, all of it, from the pump, filter housing and the valley - a can of Brakleen and compressed air does the trick exceptionally well. You could then run the engine just long enough to catch the leak as close to the source as possible. Remember that diesel fuel is very light, travels quickly and sometimes you don't see it especially on aluminum surfaces... like the filter housing. Since I use UV-dye for many types of leaks I might employ it here too.

What might you be over-looking?
Looking at your photo (can I assume it is pre-repair?) I see fuel forward of the pump coming from under the filter housing. Remember that all leaks on the top of this engine migrate to the rear. Things attached to the housing like the water separator drain, heater connector, WIF sensor, fuel pressure regulator and the most common leaker, the pressure switch. I understand that you are convinced the hoses are not leaking but unless you replace them, especially on an older engine, can you really be sure? Early in my career I lost my ass on a fuel line I thought wasn't leaking!

...just a few ideas for you.
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Old 06-23-2008, 07:06 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by ford_doctor View Post
As a professional technician I would approach this methodically. I would begin by cleaning off the fuel, all of it, from the pump, filter housing and the valley - a can of Brakleen and compressed air does the trick exceptionally well. You could then run the engine just long enough to catch the leak as close to the source as possible. Remember that diesel fuel is very light, travels quickly and sometimes you don't see it especially on aluminum surfaces... like the filter housing. Since I use UV-dye for many types of leaks I might employ it here too.

What might you be over-looking?
Looking at your photo (can I assume it is pre-repair?) I see fuel forward of the pump coming from under the filter housing. Remember that all leaks on the top of this engine migrate to the rear. Things attached to the housing like the water separator drain, heater connector, WIF sensor, fuel pressure regulator and the most common leaker, the pressure switch. I understand that you are convinced the hoses are not leaking but unless you replace them, especially on an older engine, can you really be sure? Early in my career I lost my ass on a fuel line I thought wasn't leaking!

...just a few ideas for you.

X2, what he said; it is very rare, that a new fuel pump fails, but who knows.
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Old 06-29-2008, 02:05 PM   #13 (permalink)
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I have a leak coming from the right of the filter housing, there are to sensors, what are they and do the have o rings and if so what are the part numbers for them?
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Old 10-30-2008, 07:52 AM   #14 (permalink)
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JOAT are you around ?

Your very helpful link below -

Joat’s PSD Part Numbers url:

http://www.thedwilsons.com/powerstroke/PSD_Part_Numbers.html


and your Webshots truck and WVO stuff seems to be gone ?

Please upload them again somewhere and give us the links .

Thanks
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1994 F250 7.3 IDI E4OD
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Old 10-31-2008, 08:30 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rkpatt View Post

Please upload them again somewhere and give us the links .
JOAT'S PARTS PAGE - relocated
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'97 F-350 7.3L PSD RC LB 4WD E4OD - Plant Drive VO kit
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