New Engine Break-In - Diesel Forum - TheDieselStop.com
6.0L Power Stroke Engine and Drivetrain Discussion of the 6.0L Power Stroke diesel engine and drivetrain in the 2003-Up Super Duties and Excursions. No gas engine discussion allowed except on transmissions and drivetrain that pertain to all models. Please confine discussion of topics in this forum to those items that are specific to the 6.0L Power Stroke engine.

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-13-2005, 12:08 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 47
My Photos: (0)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
New Engine Break-In

I towed a 4000# travel trailer on day one for approximately 300 miles going on vacation with brand new truck. Drove truck empty and put additional 300 miles on it. So, had 600 miles on truck before towing again. Manual says not to tow before 500 miles, will this affect my break-in period? I varied my speeds and used the tow-haul feature when towing. I am only getting average of 15.5 mpg empty. No other problems, truck has 9000 miles on it now. First oil change by dealer at 6000 miles.
lomas20042001 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-13-2005, 02:48 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 86
My Photos: (0)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Re: New Engine Break-In

When they say not to tow a trailer within 500 miles they are basically stating that you should not put a considerable load on the engine within the first 500 miles. Personally I would not pull anything the first 1,000 and only light loads the first 5,000. 15.5 MPG sounds about right for a brand new engine and towing a small load. Can't tell you really what is right , not knowing what gears you have and what the body configuration is. The mileage will steadily increase as it wears in. The best mileage people seem to be getting is 20 on the highway after break not pulling a load. The guys with an F350 DRW pulling max load and low gears get about 12.

Federally Licensed Airframe & Powerplant Technician and Avionics Tech.

95 Ranger 3.0 4x4 95,000 mi w/junk auto hubs
68 Cadillac Fleetwood 472 67,000 mi
73 New Yorker 440 97,000 mi MINT
99 Polaris Victory V-twin 1507cc (GONE)
91 Ranger 2wd, 4cyl, 245,000mi RUSTED AWAY & SOLD
84 Bronco II XLT 2.8L eng. top end dead @ 90,000mi
81 Cutlass Supreme 231 V-6 Biggest POS ever made. Typical G.M. junk.
BretMS is offline  
post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-13-2005, 02:57 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 509
My Photos: (0)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Re: New Engine Break-In

You didn't hurt anything. Some say working a truck right away will make the engine pull stronger. Your mileage will continue you to go up and will probaly plataeu around 20K miles.

-Dan.

2005 F-350, Lariat, PSD, 4x4, Crew-cab/shortbed, Escort Passport 8500, straight factory exhaust, Diprocol guages in overhead pod from dieselmanor.com, SCT from ID Econ/Tow/Xtreme Race.

*TOTALED*
Early '99 F-350, PSD, Lariat, 4x4, ext. cab, long bed, Tymar, Donahoe 2", 33" Goodyear AT/S, Bilsteins, Cobra Classic 29, Wilson 5000, Garmin GPS, Edge EVO set on Race, Pioneer H/U, Boston Acoustic speakers, (2) JL Audio 10"s,

1987 F-250
1987 Jeep Wrangler


DEERSNIPER is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-13-2005, 03:05 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Nevada
Posts: 448
My Photos: (0)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Re: New Engine Break-In

On a high RPM engine like a motorcycle you do want to push the engine for hard short bursts to get the rings seated properly. This allows the top end of the cycle to seat without causing excessive ridges. If it gets hot then the cylinder walls glaze and the rings never seat properly. But on a low RPM engine like a PSD you want a nice steady seat at various RPMs but no loading up. If you pulled that trailer over some big hills you may have loaded it up. This may cause a low ridge on the cylinder, which could in turn break a ring. How does it run? Any smoke? Any loss of power from a leaking ring? If not, I would not worry too much, but I would not pull that trick again. Luck only works for so long before her evil brother takes over.

Nate

2006 F350 PSD Crew Cab, Short Box -
MODS:
I wired my radar detector into the #4 upfitter switch.

Valley Slider, full articulatioon 5er hitch.
Layton Rampage 289 - two ATVs - Box of firewood - full tank of gas...what else ya need?
stuckinthemud is offline  
post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-13-2005, 05:01 PM
Senior Member
 
overfly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: The Motor City
Posts: 796
My Photos: (16)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Re: New Engine Break-In

[ QUOTE ]
I towed a 4000# travel trailer on day one for approximately 300 miles going on vacation with brand new truck. Drove truck empty and put additional 300 miles on it. So, had 600 miles on truck before towing again. Manual says not to tow before 500 miles, will this affect my break-in period? I varied my speeds and used the tow-haul feature when towing. I am only getting average of 15.5 mpg empty. No other problems, truck has 9000 miles on it now. First oil change by dealer at 6000 miles.

[/ QUOTE ]

I believe that the towing break-in period is more for the rear end than it is for the engine. Gives the gears a chance to mesh. At least that is what I've been told... [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/shrug.gif[/img]

2006
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Amarillo Package,loaded with all the toys, 4" MBRP cat back exhaust, Autometer EGT gauge, Viper 791XV auto start/cool down timer/alarm, Pioneer AVIC-D3 navigation/XM Radio/Sirius, 2.5" Tuff Country Leveling kit, KC Hilights front & rear, Dieselsite.com coolant filter, SkyJacker dual steering stabilizer, Firestone Ride Rite airbags w/onboard compressor, Kleinn Train Horns, Bilsteins all the way around, Recon LED's in the back, Programmed with the SuperChips 1805 Tuner always set on Tow Safe for a little extra get up and go.

30' Cardinal 30TS 5th wheel. The weekend home away from home.

"The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese."
overfly is offline  
post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-13-2005, 07:30 PM
Senior Member
 
NickBeek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: South Carolina, USA
Posts: 341
My Photos: (0)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Re: New Engine Break-In

I towed my 8500lb travel trailer through the foothills of SC at 570 miles on the clock. Result my engine does not use oil. On my '99 7.3 I babied it for 1000 miles before I ever towed, it used oil until the day I traded it (65k miles), and it never pulled as good as I thought it should. Your fine. Drive it and enjoy it.

My mileage is up to about 18 empty, 10.2 pulling my TT. That's as good as it's gotten for me.

2014 Ram 2500 Cummins Laramie, Black on Black, 4x4, Auto, trifold bed cover, EFI live 4 tune with trans tuning.

Sold: 2006 2500 SLT Mineral Grey, 6 speed, 4x4, Thunder Road Package, MBRP Muffler + 6" dual Stacks, Fast Idle Enabled. Silencer Ring MIA, CFM+ intake horn, Smarty POD, SB Con OFe.


Traded:2004 F250CC FX4 XLT Long Bed Torque Shift, $5.00 AIC.
NickBeek is offline  
post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-13-2005, 08:07 PM
OT
Senior Member
 
OT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Sparks, Nevada
Posts: 4,323
My Photos: (8)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Re: New Engine Break-In

Well not exactly. I would imagine the otimers here (smokey etc) are getting a chuckle from this thread. Anyone here read the long/very informative artice/threads on "breaking in a diesel engine" Maybe someone here has link, sorry I dont.

BM...does it really matter now.(about towing) [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/shrug.gif[/img] My 03 got better @ 16K...19mpg solo/flat road/no wind/"65 MPH" & calc. done w/solid fuel into neck. 13mpg around town. Gotta pay real close attention when tracking mpg. Seems you have good chance of getting better mpg w/more mi. on e. JMO! Good luck.

03 F250 XLT SC/SB 4X4 6L (stock) TqS. SRW 3.73's BD:02/11/03. 01 TL 23' SGII
OT is offline  
post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-13-2005, 09:27 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 38
My Photos: (0)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Re: New Engine Break-In

My past experience with a Dodge Cummins was put 500 miles on it then tow heavy , tow often. It worked fantastic, I started towing my 11,000 pound boat at 500 miles and 80k later, it doesn't use a drop of oil and returns great mpg. I plan on doing the same with my new 2005 6.0 Excursion and I hope it responds the same.

2005 Excursion purchased 12/10/05. oil drop on bellhousing cleared up at 15k. 30k trouble free miles ! Love the truck !
motorhead440 is offline  
post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-13-2005, 09:45 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 47
My Photos: (0)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Re: New Engine Break-In

Thanks everyone...

2005 F-250 XLT 6.0L Crewcab Short box. external coolant filter, EGR delete, updated oil cooler, exhaust manifolds with gaskets, OEM head gaskets, ARP studs, Bully Dog Outlook GT, FICM, Prestone ELC coolant, Shell Rotella T 15-40, Updated: turbo feed line and drain, stand pipes and dummy plugs, blue spring, 6.4 banjo bolts, STC fitting.
lomas20042001 is offline  
post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-14-2005, 06:45 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Michigan
Posts: 313
My Photos: (0)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Re: New Engine Break-In

Here's the article. I don't know how to link it?

Mark

Breaking in a Diesel Engine
Source:

Jay Chlebowski

[email protected]

This article outlines the processes and prescribes a superior method for breaking in the Current Production Diesel Engine.

"Breaking-in" a new diesel engine... You may immediately come up with some questions such as… Why did Ford-Diesel.com release an article about something that is a non-issue? I thought newer engines were manufactured with precision crafted parts? According to the manufacturer, there is supposed to be “no break-in necessary”? Many of the engine manufacturers claim that their engines do not require break-in. That is just pure baloney! Enough pestering and a few references to some of the Cummins shop manuals have painted a clearer picture. All engines require some kind of break-in period. This is even true with current technology. Although current technology provides the means of manufacturing engine parts with unimaginable precision, the manufacturer still falls far short of achieving the near perfect fit that a proper break-in will provide. “Break-in,” for the most part, is the allowance of the machined cylinder and ring surfaces to conform to each other’s shape during engine operation. This conforming or “mating” of ring and cylinder surfaces is the ultimate goal of a proper break-in. “Mating” these two specific parts will produce a very tight seal in each cylinder. A tight seal is very important because it prevents the escape of unburned fuel and pressurized gasses into the crankcase, while further preventing crankcase oil from entering the cylinder above the top compression ring. It is the intention of this article to help people understand more about the break-in process, and what happens or can happen during the first few thousand miles of engine operation.

During break-in, a small amount of compression blow-by, oil-fuel dilution, and oil consumption will be experienced. This is perfectly normal and quite common in new engines. Although acceptable at first it is imperative that these undesirable attributes be as close to zero as possible after break-in has been completed. Although the others are important, blow-by is the primary reason the ring and cylinder wall interface has to fit together so tightly. Diesel fuel needs to be introduced into an air environment that is under intense pressure in order for it to burn without an ignition source. When the fuel burns, the gasses produced multiply the compression pressure in the cylinder. Pressurized gasses that escape by means of the compression ring / cylinder wall interface are called blow-by gases. Pressure that escapes the cylinder in this manner results in a loss of energy. Whether it is pressure lost on compression or combustion, it is unable to be utilized to drive the piston through the power stroke. This loss ultimately results in a reduction of fuel mileage and power.

Today’s Diesels can take a "few" miles to fully break in. 10,000 miles is not an uncommon break-in period, especially for an engine like the Power Stroke Diesel. The reasons that break-in is such a lengthy process are generally attributed to engineering targets as well as the function of diesel combustion.

In terms of engineering targets, engine manufacturers produce diesel engines to sustain high torque loads over constant and extended load intervals. In other words, very durable parts are required to hold up to the rigors of diesel operating conditions. For example, The International Truck and Engine Company employs some very special parts in their 175 - 275 hp engines. The pistons used in these engines are manufactured from lightweight aluminum alloy, and are constructed with Ni-Resist ring inserts. The aforementioned piston combination is further complemented with keystone plasma faced rings. These rings help reduce oil consumption and can extend the life of the power cylinder further than ordinary chromium-plated rings. While chromium-plated rings continue to be produced for both diesel and gasoline applications, they are slowly becoming old technology. They still perform well but plasma faced rings have consistently shown superior performance.

When we consider the function of diesel combustion, we must first understand the engine dynamics that are associated with that process. In order for break-in to occur, a fair amount of heat, friction and resulting wear will have to take place before the compression rings will have “mated” with the cylinder walls. When the rings and cylinder wall are new, a modest amount of heat is created merely from the friction of the new rings passing over the freshly honed cylinder wall. While the heat from friction is significant, the real heat is created from combustion of fuel in the cylinder. When the fuel is burned, gasses are produced that expand and heat all of the cylinder parts. If enough fuel is introduced, the resulting combustion can create gasses that expand so much they will actually expand the cylinder wall and the compression rings. It is important to understand this because expanding these parts places additional pressure on them, which creates more friction and correspondingly more heat. This does not take into account the additional heat from combustion that will be added to the heat from friction. Heat is important to assist wear for break-in but too much can cause major problems. This is the reason we should not subject the engine to significant loading for the first 1000 miles of its operation. Loading heavily will introduce more fuel to the cylinder, and will add significant amounts of heat and pressure to the cylinder components. Couple that scenario with new rings on a freshly honed cylinder wall and we can only imagine the amount of friction and heat being produced and absorbed by the rings. Furthermore, the engine oil, lubricating the cylinder walls, will flash burn when it contacts the very hot rings. The burned oil will leave a hard, enamel like residue on the cylinder wall, commonly known as oil glazing. When the rings are permitted to operate under such high temperatures, oil glazing of the cylinder can happen very quickly. Once this glaze builds up, the only repair is a labor-intensive process that requires disassembling the engine and re-honing the effected cylinders. Oil glazing is a problem because it is typically not distributed evenly in the cylinder, and the spaces that exist between the ring and cylinder wall are either still there or new larger ones are created. Oil glazing is typically thicker towards the top of the cylinder and it builds up in the areas where heating is the greatest. The glaze has very smooth and friction free properties that do not allow it to be scraped away by the rings. This inhibits further metal-to-metal wear between the cylinder wall and rings, preventing further mating of ring and cylinder. Thus, those small gaps between ring and cylinder surface will never seal. These spaces will then allow pressurized gasses and unburned fuel to escape into the crankcase, while allowing oil from the crankcase to enter the cylinder above the top compression ring.

Well why not run the engine at idle or under no load? This is bad too. It can create a similar condition to glazing. The rings need to expand a little during this initial break-in period, just not so much that they overheat and flash the engine oil. The engine needs to be moderately loaded in order to break in correctly. Running the engine under very light or no load prevents the oil film placed on the cylinder wall from being scraped away by the expanding compression rings. The rings will instead “hydroplane” or ride over the deposited oil film, allowing it to be exposed to the cylinder combustion. The oil film will then partially burn on the cylinder leaving a residue that will build up and oxidize over time. Eventually this leaves a hard deposit on the cylinder wall that is very similar to the glaze left from flash burning. My caution to those just running the engine as a normal daily driver (without some loading) and especially those who love to idle their vehicles, expect some VERY extended break-in periods (up to 30,000 miles on one I know of). Expect oil consumption forever due to oil glazing. The rings never really seat well if they cannot expand from the dynamics and heat that a load produces. Expect poor mileage due to the passing of compression and combustion gasses around the compression rings. Additionally, expect to see increased bearing wear and engine wear due to the fuel passing the rings diluting the engine oil.

Thus, we can see that heavy loading and light loading can cause some major problems. Moderate loading is the key to a proper break in for the first 1000 miles. It permits the loose fitting piston rings to expand into the cylinder walls allowing them to perform double duty: First, scraping oil off the cylinder wall, and second, to create friction that will promote wearing the two surfaces to each other’s proportions. Furthermore, moderate loading will allow the rings to get hot but not to the point where it will flash the lubricating oil supplied to the cylinder walls.

Once the rings and cylinder have "mated," they will have worn away a considerable amount of their roughness. They will wear slower than they did when they were new. This reduced wear rate indicates the end of break-in, and a decrease in oil consumption should be obvious to the owner / operator. Furthermore, blow-by and fuel dilution should also be reduced but may not be so obviously evident. Be aware that engines employing Plasma faced ring technology will take a longer time to break-in. These rings tend to wear far slower than chromium-plated rings. The plasma ring’s hardness allows it to wear the cylinder wall in a more aggressive manner while only polishing the ring surface. Eventually the cylinder wall wears to the shape of the ring and subsequent cylinder wear evolves to a polishing process. This extended process drastically improves the sealing potential of the cylinder, which will correspondingly reduce blow-by and the amount of physical wear on these components. Therefore, we can safely say that the plasma faced ring / Ni Resist insert combination greatly extends engine life. Unfortunately, the price of this better seal is a longer break-in period.

So the big question is: How long does it take for an engine to break-in? Outside of the rings being hard as rocks and just taking their own sweet time to mate to the cylinder bores, the greatest factor is how the engine is broken-in. Most engines will be broken-in after running for some time, but some ways of breaking-in an engine are far superior to others as they are more likely to produce low blow-by and near zero oil consumption.

Therefore, I will lay out some recommended DOs well as definite DON’Ts:

1. DON'T run the engine hard for the first 50 to 100 miles. It is recommended that the engine be operated around the torque peak (1500 to 1800 RPM) in high gear. This loads the engine very gently, and allows the internal parts to "get acquainted" without any extreme forces.

2. DON'T let the engine idle for more than five (5) minutes at any one time during the first 100 miles. (Even in traffic.) Remember those loose fitting rings, and possible fuel-oil dilution that were noted above? (Fuel Dilution is very common when diesels idle, even with well broken-in engines.) Well, if that fuel is allowed to contact the main and rod bearings during break in (not really good at any time), you might be looking at an engine that will always consume some oil and one that may not produce power or mileage as expected. In the first few miles of break-in, the bearings are mating to the crank, rods, etc. It is imperative during this time that the lubrication qualities of the oil remain robust. Fuel in the oil will reduce its ability to absorb shock and float the rotating parts in their bearings. Contact between bearings and journals will occur more frequently which will result in additional friction wear. This will ultimately reduce the tight tolerances between the bearings and journals. What was originally a tight fit will be sloppy and will never be able to mate properly.

3. DO drive the engine at varying RPMs and speeds until about 1000 miles. The idea is to alternately heat and cool the rings under varying RPMs. Manual transmission-equipped trucks are the best for this as they typically employ engine compression to slow the vehicle during normal operation, this constantly allows for varied RPMs. This can also be done with automatic transmissions, but it requires that you manually downshift the transmission into the lower gears while driving. Typically, most people with automatic transmissions operate their vehicles in Drive or Overdrive gear positions without making these manual shifts. When their vehicle is decelerating and the speed falls below 38 mph the transmission has little influence on engine RPM. This is because the torque converter unlocks and the auto transmission does not downshift to lower gears in the same fashion that manually shifting does. My suggestion to those with auto transmissions is to find an empty parking lot in the evening, and drive back and forth across it in the lower gears. (This can be done with standard transmission trucks as well.) Each time revving her up close to redline and letting engine compression slow it back down. This gets the rings a bit hot, but the compression braking allows the pistons to cool with high oil spray flow and no fuel load. Keep doing this for a number of runs, or until boredom sets in.

4. DO put a load on the engine at around 1000 miles, and get the thing hot! Diesels are designed to work, and in many cases, they operate best under a load. Baptize your engine with a nice "initiation load," to introduce it to hard work. Keep the revs up (but watch the EGTs), and make sure the coolant temps rise. Hooking up your trailer and finding some hills to pull works great for this. After the 1000 mile pull, just drive it normally, always making sure to let the engine get up to normal operating temps (no 1-mile trips to 7-Eleven). Towing is ok but remember to not overload and to monitor your gauges carefully erring on the side of caution. Under these conditions, I have seen most diesels completely break-in between 10-15,000 miles, and have always been able to tell that point from mileage gains. One may also notice that the "symphony" of the engine also changes slightly at this point.

We know that Engine Manufacturers have built today’s diesel engines using state of the art technology. They have fashioned parts to match in near perfect fashion. We can understand, through this article, that breaking-in this modern marvel of technology is more important then the manufacturers have lead us to believe. Furthermore, we can appreciate that following their claims can result in an engine that is wrought with inefficiency, sloppy fitting parts, and oil consumption problems. Following the guidelines and warnings set forth in this article will provide anyone who desires maximum efficiency and power out of his engine many miles of trouble free operation.

Happy Motoring!
Best Regards,
Jay

13 6.7 DRW Lariat FX4 CC Blue Jean Metallic w/ Sterling Gray accent. WeatherTech floor mats, Duraflaps, Firestone Ride Rites, and Airlift wireless compressor.

2007 F-250 King Ranch,Dark Copper, CC, 4x4, FX4, PSD, Torqshift, tow command, SOLD


2008 Cedar Creek 34RLSA
mlabelle is offline  
post #11 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-14-2005, 10:21 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Nevada
Posts: 448
My Photos: (0)
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Re: New Engine Break-In

[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
I towed a 4000# travel trailer on day one for approximately 300 miles going on vacation with brand new truck. Drove truck empty and put additional 300 miles on it. So, had 600 miles on truck before towing again. Manual says not to tow before 500 miles, will this affect my break-in period? I varied my speeds and used the tow-haul feature when towing. I am only getting average of 15.5 mpg empty. No other problems, truck has 9000 miles on it now. First oil change by dealer at 6000 miles.

[/ QUOTE ]

I believe that the towing break-in period is more for the rear end than it is for the engine. Gives the gears a chance to mesh. At least that is what I've been told... [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/shrug.gif[/img]

[/ QUOTE ]

That makes sense. When I redid the gears on my 92 K2500 the pamphlet that came with the gears advised no towing for first 500 miles.

Nate

2006 F350 PSD Crew Cab, Short Box -
MODS:
I wired my radar detector into the #4 upfitter switch.

Valley Slider, full articulatioon 5er hitch.
Layton Rampage 289 - two ATVs - Box of firewood - full tank of gas...what else ya need?
stuckinthemud is offline  
post #12 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-14-2005, 03:56 PM
Senior Member
 
lincster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Phoenix Az.
Posts: 2,863
My Photos: (29)
Garage
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Re: New Engine Break-In

[ QUOTE ]
The guys with an F350 DRW pulling max load and low gears get about 12.

[/ QUOTE ]

I wish. I get 7.5mpg towing at max load with my dually and 4.30 gears.

I started towing 14,000lbs at 740 miles. I changed the breakin oil out and put in 15W40, like the manual says.
6800 miles on the odometer and the truck runs awesome and uses no oil. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smokin.gif[/img]

2019 F350 4X4 Dually, FX4, Crew Cab, Ultimate Lariat Package, Agate Black, Black Leather towing a 2006 LE3905 Weekend Warrior

2002 F250 CC, 4X4 - Sold
2004 F350 CC, FX4, loaded - Sold
2006 F350 CC, DRW, FX4 - Sold
2012 F350 CC, DRW, FX4 - Sold
lincster is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

  Diesel Forum - TheDieselStop.com > 1999-2007 Ford Super Duties > 6.0L Power Stroke Engine and Drivetrain

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Diesel Forum - TheDieselStop.com forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome