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7.3L IDI Diesels (Not Power Strokes) Technical discussion of topics related to vehicles powered by the 7.3 Liter In-Direct Injection Navistar engines.

Thread: Eliminating fuel filter heater Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
12-27-2018 01:16 PM
LMJD
Quote:
Originally Posted by DENNY View Post
I would prefer to have a fuel heater in the truck for most of the country. The main issue with Diesel and cold temps is the cloud point of the fuel. This is when wax in the fuel comes out of solution and starts clogging filters not the fuel line. A fuel heater at the filter will help prevent this. Most fuel today is properly blended for the area you are driving, however, every now and then you hear of an issue. 18 years ago every fall you would see several posts pop up about people with fuel issue. Now if it is a leak monster and causing problems getting rid of it may be the answer. I had a 79 VW Rabbit in Minnesota back in the day. Manual said you could add a gallon of gas per tank of diesel, I used that and additive it worked at -40.
DENNY
Yep, that's why when my heater sprung a leak at the plastic plug I opted to buy a new one. Bad part is I drive my '91 so little nowadays it has non winterized fuel in it. I pour in the correct amount of Power Service (antigel formula) but don't know how much to trust it. Years ago there was an out of town box truck pulled over on the east edge of town with tarps all around the outside edges and a portable heater blowing under the entire truck. Those poor guys baby sat that thing for about 3 or 4 days trying to thaw out the diesel.
12-27-2018 12:58 PM
DENNY I would prefer to have a fuel heater in the truck for most of the country. The main issue with Diesel and cold temps is the cloud point of the fuel. This is when wax in the fuel comes out of solution and starts clogging filters not the fuel line. A fuel heater at the filter will help prevent this. Most fuel today is properly blended for the area you are driving, however, every now and then you hear of an issue. 18 years ago every fall you would see several posts pop up about people with fuel issue. Now if it is a leak monster and causing problems getting rid of it may be the answer. I had a 79 VW Rabbit in Minnesota back in the day. Manual said you could add a gallon of gas per tank of diesel, I used that and additive it worked at -40.
DENNY
12-27-2018 11:21 AM
LMJD I should add, I don't know if it's every winter, but our nearest Costco (Billings, MT) carries the chemical warmers in big bulk boxes at a very cheap price. I'd think the Colorado Costco's do too?
12-27-2018 11:18 AM
LMJD
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArcticDriver View Post
I swear by these. They last about 6-8 hours and allow me to wear thin gloves for dexterity around instruments.

About $1/pair unless you find them on sale though...I used to buy them myself and catch flack from all the crews for being a wuss.
Absolutely, we used to help a rancher yearly trail his cattle down from mountain grazing on horseback 17+ miles, then later 13 miles down a secondary highway from the beet fields to his pasture and I had the chemical hand warmers in my gloves and also in the toe of each boot. There's very little cab heat off the back of a horse at 10.
12-27-2018 01:26 AM
ArcticDriver
Quote:
Originally Posted by LMJD View Post
I can't do anything that requires some finesse with gloves on. To make things worse, I got my hands frost bit years ago flyfishing and my hand muscles are weak and the cold really gets to them. I asked my vet at the time what gloves are warmest and he said he didn't have a clue. Said one day his hands were so cold he lost a fingernail pulling a calf.
I swear by these. They last about 6-8 hours and allow me to wear thin gloves for dexterity around instruments.

About $1/pair unless you find them on sale though...

There are things I miss about the old days but that pain of cold fingers going numb and then the throbbing pain as they warmed up in front of a cab heater is not one of them.
12-26-2018 08:33 PM
ArcticDriver
Quote:
Originally Posted by 79jasper View Post
Well... it does nothing, besides cause air intrusion.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
Forgot my cheaters and can barely read the text to go back and search if he is asking about AIH or fuel bowl heater.. What you say is true of the AIH. I deleted mine just to give a bit more room to the Valley floor.

But the fuel bowl heater I have always kept installed.
I do think the heater is valuable in frigid temps since so much “heated” fuel is returned to the tank even under WOT, but does the heated fuel make a difference? I can’t say with certainty.
12-26-2018 06:26 PM
LMJD
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randy 4614 View Post
Maybe I am missing something, but what is the purpose of eliminating the fuel heater?
If the weather is cold enough to gel your diesel fuel, the heater will supposedly warm the fuel IN THE FILTER. However that's not going to mean much when the fuel is gelled in all the other fuel lines. The heater has 2 (if I remember right) O-rings that can leak over time. Some guys choose to eliminate it and install a pipe plug instead. Otherwise the O-rings can be replaced.
12-26-2018 05:34 PM
79jasper Well... it does nothing, besides cause air intrusion.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
12-26-2018 03:28 PM
Randy 4614 Maybe I am missing something, but what is the purpose of eliminating the fuel heater?
12-26-2018 10:36 AM
LMJD I can't do anything that requires some finesse with gloves on. To make things worse, I got my hands frost bit years ago flyfishing and my hand muscles are weak and the cold really gets to them. I asked my vet at the time what gloves are warmest and he said he didn't have a clue. Said one day his hands were so cold he lost a fingernail pulling a calf.
12-25-2018 06:38 PM
ArcticDriver I know what you mean about breaking it off clean but not with Arctic gloves on...Lol

I cut every length.

MERRY CHRISTMAS !
12-25-2018 02:04 PM
oldrebuiltdodge Wapping it the wrong way, and ending it in the wrong place are the two most common mistakes...besides over using it. I have had to make up as many as 30 fittings at one time. You just don't stop to cut it off each time you finish. If you pull it off right it won't string. The strigs I referred to in my original post, were when the fitting is taken apart. You have to be careful not to get that stuff in a hydraulic system or something equally as sensitive. When that happens you can really make a mess. Then there is always the fool who puts new tape over old instead of cleanig it off.

MERRY CHRISTMAS Y'ALL
12-25-2018 02:00 AM
ArcticDriver
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldrebuiltdodge View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by LMJD View Post
Actually I've used the Permatex/Locktite tape a lot, but like the factory rep said, you have to start it a thread or two back tapering the windings, and most importantly, wind it on in the proper direction so it stays put. Been a life-saver winding it on thick on certain worn out sloppy hydraulic fittings.
I have used it extensively as well. I have also seen cast, and especially aluminum housings split wide open because someone overtightened a fitting with tape on it. Having been in the oil and gas industry, I have gone through more teflon tape than I care to think about. I simply tried to keep the OP from ruining his filter housing.
I think you guys are both right. PTFE tape is an excellent product for so many applications WHEN USED CORRECTLY.

The trouble is, and I don’t think this is an exxageration, the majority of guys don’t know how to use it.

There are alot of self-taught or YouTube DIY guys who mistakenly think its tape, how difficult can it be? The days of knowledge being passed down ended 20+ years ago so you have guys who don’t know telling new guys that don’t know.

And this holds true in the Oil & Gas Industry and not just the shadetree mechanic.

I see guys pulling it apart resulting in “strings” instead of cutting it, using too much, getting small particles or even metal shaving stuck to it, wrapping the wrong way, not wrapping snug, etc..
12-24-2018 11:46 PM
oldrebuiltdodge
Quote:
Originally Posted by LMJD View Post
Actually I've used the Permatex/Locktite tape a lot, but like the factory rep said, you have to start it a thread or two back tapering the windings, and most importantly, wind it on in the proper direction so it stays put. Been a life-saver winding it on thick on certain worn out sloppy hydraulic fittings.
I have used it extensively as well. I have also seen cast, and especially aluminum housings split wide open because someone overtightened a fitting with tape on it. Having been in the oil and gas industry, I have gone through more teflon tape than I care to think about. I simply tried to keep the OP from ruining his filter housing.
12-24-2018 10:14 AM
Randy 4614 Can not remember what the line ends are like, but if for hose can use a flaring tool to put a small flare on the end to help hold the hose.
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