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'99 & up 7.3L Power Stroke Engine and Drivetrain Discussion of the '99 & up 7.3L Power Stroke diesel engine and drivetrain in the 1999-Up Super Duty trucks and Excursions. No gas engine discussion allowed except on transmissions and drivetrain that pertain to all models. Please confine discussion of topics in this forum to those items that are specific to the 7.3L Power Stroke engine.

Thread: Odd injector cup problem Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
01-18-2019 08:01 PM
Greg03PSD The instructions that came with the Riffraff tools say to put the green Loctite sealant on the 2 vertical sections of the cup (located at the top and bottom of the cup). If the sealant is doing its job, I would think that coolant would not make its way to the bottom of the cup.


I agree that all bets are off if the engine is overheated. No telling what happens to the sealants. I know that my engine has never been overheated, so I can safely eliminate that as a cause. I don't think there are any issues with the cooling system, so I don't think the cup damage was caused by the coolant.
01-18-2019 05:36 PM
klhansen
Yep, pretty close to the bottom, but there is a short cylindrical section. Doesn't the sealant go on that section and also near the top?
01-18-2019 04:48 AM
ford_doctor If you look at a cutaway of the cylinder head that shows the injector bore with the cup installed you would see that coolant certainly does surround the bottom of the cup with the exception of the bottom where it contacts the cylinder head and is sandwiched between the injector tip and the seat. Of course this question is totally irrelevant if the engine was overheated.
01-17-2019 07:08 PM
Greg03PSD
Quote:
Originally Posted by ford_doctor View Post
So I went digging and asked around. This is more common than I personally was aware of but not of epidemic proportion. Check for any cooling system concerns and correct them. The brass cups suffer if the engine is overheated, nor do the brass cups like the newer coolants people seem to think are okay to use. If you can source stainless steel injector cups for this engine that should cure it of a repeat failure.
I read about quite a few instances of the bottom of the cup breaking off, but the break usually occurs at the top of the vertical flange (about 1/4" above the bottom of the cup). Cooling system problems would make sense for a break like that since the coolant comes in contact with the cup in that area. On my broken cup, only the bottom of the cup was missing - the small vertical flange was still there. Since coolant is not in contact with that area of the cup, I doubt that coolant was a contributor to the problem. At any rate, I do not think there are any issues with my cooling system. The antifreeze in the cooling system is Ford Premium Gold. I have owned the truck since 2004, and the engine has never overheated in the time that I have owned it. The cups were replaced about 3 years ago and the cooling system was flushed and refilled with new coolant as part of the job. I did get an EGT alarm once on a hard pull up I-8 in California, but I backed off immediately. Hit around 1400F for less than 10 seconds.

I doubt there are any pieces of the cup in the cylinder. It has been about 18 months since I discovered the initial problem with the cup (when I thought the metal bits were parts of the copper washer). I pulled all the pieces out of the injector bore. If any fell into the cylinder, I am sure they are long gone by now.
01-15-2019 02:10 PM
RT I know you can get stainless cups for the DT466e, but I've never seen or heard of them for the DT444e or the 7.3 - have you seen them?
01-15-2019 11:31 AM
ford_doctor So I went digging and asked around. This is more common than I personally was aware of but not of epidemic proportion. Check for any cooling system concerns and correct them. The brass cups suffer if the engine is overheated, nor do the brass cups like the newer coolants people seem to think are okay to use. If you can source stainless steel injector cups for this engine that should cure it of a repeat failure.
01-12-2019 09:19 AM
Absolute It appears its not bellowed at all when I look at it. It looks like the whole bottom of the cone is gone. So it appears bellowed, but its just missing the portion up to the first gasket. Amazed none of that metal made it into the cylinder. Thankfully the metal is soft, so it would probably just burn up and probably no damage if it did. I have a camera that fits down through that hole to see, I would look for dents and damage to the top of the piston, may even be metal welded on top. Better get it out now if it did. Its easy to do without removing the head if you need too. PM me if you need to know the procedure to clean the top of the piston without head removal.
01-11-2019 11:39 AM
ford_doctor I have one question: How were you able to remove that injector cup with it bellowed out like that?
01-11-2019 10:26 AM
Absolute Its an offer, but I think Riffraff still rents it too, for cheap + shipping. So doubt anyone will need it. Looks pretty in the specialty tool drawer as well. Almost everyone says "whats that", giving me another chance to brag about how fun my build was. Lol, I leave the drawer open a bit , front and center, just so they notice it. Hahahaha
01-11-2019 07:26 AM
Whiskyb
Quote:
Originally Posted by Absolute View Post
. Injector cup extraction and installation tools are a little beyond what I can make at home, and a crude tool is not a good choice for that job!

Agreed, some tools take too much time to fab up, better off buying one or renting. Wouldn't want to scratch up a new cup beating it in with a home made tool. If your in a pinch though, Canadian Tire rents every tool they supply for free. Don't think they'd have a cup tool though. I'd gladly lend anyone mine if you near me. Riffraff gave me one for free cause I spent a small fortune there doing my build. Free to all, gimme a PM if you need it.[/QUOTE]


That is a great offer but about a month too late for me
01-11-2019 02:22 AM
Absolute . Injector cup extraction and installation tools are a little beyond what I can make at home, and a crude tool is not a good choice for that job![/QUOTE]


Agreed, some tools take too much time to fab up, better off buying one or renting. Wouldn't want to scratch up a new cup beating it in with a home made tool. If your in a pinch though, Canadian Tire rents every tool they supply for free. Don't think they'd have a cup tool though. I'd gladly lend anyone mine if you near me. Riffraff gave me one for free cause I spent a small fortune there doing my build. Free to all, gimme a PM if you need it.
01-10-2019 06:32 PM
Greg03PSD We were talking about the injector cup tools - the only tools I have ever needed to install an injector are my hand and a rubber hammer.

I will generally try to make my own special tools if I can just weld up some scrap steel and maybe throw a little bit of threaded rod in. I have made a spring compressor for a C6 transmission, an axle spreader for installing differentials, and a crankshaft holding tool for Honda/Acura. I'm sure there are several others I am forgetting. Injector cup extraction and installation tools are a little beyond what I can make at home, and a crude tool is not a good choice for that job!
01-09-2019 04:37 PM
Texkenusmc Absolute you are right on the money. I try and make most of my special tools if I have time. Our get my boy to make it on his CNC machine at the wedding school.
01-09-2019 12:22 PM
Absolute
Quote:
Originally Posted by RT View Post
There's a tool for anything. Probably meant for applications where you can't get good leverage on an injector. Here's a link that has a picture of the Rotunda tool for the injector install - https://areadieselservice.com/diesel...oduct/99-1010/
Well, now I've seen one. Lol. Wonder if any dummy actually bought that. Scroll down a bit and get a look at the fuel line disconnect tool they sell for 53 bucks as well. Bahahaha, who could be so silly as to buy one of those. People gotta get more creative. I cant believe they make either of those tools. Injectors push in with one finger. No tool needed there. And if anyone else besides me ever noticed, every router and hand grinder set, or Dremel type tool, comes with a tool that you use to hold the collar when tightening in a new bit. That tool is an exact fit to the disconnects, and works better than a flimsy 53 dollar specialty tool. I got about 10 of those kicking around, and the sellers of those tools will give you one for free if you email them. Save yourself some money and get creative. And eat your Wheaties so you don't need a tool to put an injector in a hole. Hahahahaha!
01-09-2019 09:25 AM
RT
Quote:
Originally Posted by Absolute View Post
I have never seen an Injector install tool though, I just pushed them in by hand, and torqued to spec.

There's a tool for anything. Probably meant for applications where you can't get good leverage on an injector. Here's a link that has a picture of the Rotunda tool for the injector install - https://areadieselservice.com/diesel...oduct/99-1010/
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