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  Topic Review (Newest First)
01-07-2019 08:27 PM
oldrebuiltdodge When I was moving to Kansas, I was told that there was nothing between Kansas, and the North Pole, but a barb wire fence, and it leans south. I've been to Wyoming, and when you can get passed by an empty Coke can @ 60 mph...well that's more wind than I ever saw anywhere in Kansas.
01-06-2019 01:18 PM
Randy 4614
Quote:
Originally Posted by LMJD View Post
Yep, years ago a driver said on his CB, hey, the wind quit! Then some quick-thinking individual answered back, if the wind ever quit in WY everybody would fall down!
Yep same here, I wish you guys would stop sending your wind on up north here. Getting tired of it .
01-06-2019 01:00 PM
Steve83
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArcticDriver View Post
That heater draws some amps.
9.1
Quote:
Originally Posted by RT View Post
Actually... wind moving across moisture...
Right - "wind chill" only applies to liquid water, and only when relative humidity is below 100%. Relative humidity doesn't apply to air below 32F because there is no humidity in that air. But as that air strikes a warm object/body, the air warms. If it comes above 32 its relative humidity is 0% at that instant, causing extreme wind chill ONLY to wet/damp/humid surfaces. Yes, wind will cool dry surfaces faster than stagnant air does, but that's not what "wind chill" means. Only keyboard physicists/meteorologists confuse that term.
01-06-2019 11:33 AM
Xeonpony
Quote:
Originally Posted by LMJD View Post
Right, and quite a few "keyboard mechanics" have argued wind chill only applies to living flesh. Park your truck on a 10 day in the sun with no wind and the cab will be way warmer than the same temp on a windy day. Even with a dark color the cold wind sucks the heat right out of the sheet metal.

speaking in engineering terms wind chill is a fake number, you can not get below ambient on a dry surface no matter how much wind you have, I would wager that to which they are referring, but wind will help take a warm engine down to ambient faster, and cause you to have to input more energy into it to get to a desired temp with wind in the equation.


But once homeostasis with the ambient temperature wind will cease to have any effect on it until we desire to raise the temp. (Wish I had a wind break for my car and truck as out here you really need it as stuff be cold!)
01-06-2019 09:59 AM
LMJD
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArcticDriver View Post
A good rule to live by:
Never argue with a man from Wyoming about wind !
😉
Yep, years ago a driver said on his CB, hey, the wind quit! Then some quick-thinking individual answered back, if the wind ever quit in WY everybody would fall down!
01-06-2019 01:52 AM
DENNY Several ways to compute Wind Chill Factor some do not use humidity in the formula. However, Bugman is correct, you will not reduce temperature below ambient. The Wind Chill Factor charts came about in Artic exploration as a way to prevent frostbite.
DENNY
01-05-2019 10:19 PM
bugman When you put moisture into the equation all bets are off.
01-05-2019 10:05 PM
RT
Quote:
Originally Posted by bugman View Post

The effect of wind chill is to increase the rate of heat loss and reduce any warmer objects to the ambient temperature more quickly. It cannot, however, reduce the temperature of these objects below the ambient temperature, no matter how great the wind velocity.

Actually... wind moving across moisture evaporates that moisture which removes thermal units by the heat of vaporization (energy required for the phase shift from liquid to gas) - thats the principle behind evaporative coolers, how perspiration cools a body, etc.






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01-05-2019 09:29 PM
chuckster57
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArcticDriver View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by LMJD View Post
Quote:
When its my own dime I plug in when its +20*F sometimes, depends on if its windy since that wind will be pulling heat away.
Right, and quite a few "keyboard mechanics" have argued wind chill only applies to living flesh. Park your truck on a 10° day in the sun with no wind and the cab will be way warmer than the same temp on a windy day. Even with a dark color the cold wind sucks the heat right out of the sheet metal.
A good rule to live by:
Never argue with a man from Wyoming about wind !

😉
Well said my friend.
01-05-2019 08:20 PM
ArcticDriver +1 on the cord ends that light up when powered.

Also be sure to get the proper gauge extension cord. That heater draws some amps.
01-05-2019 08:16 PM
ArcticDriver
Quote:
Originally Posted by LMJD View Post
Quote:
When its my own dime I plug in when its +20*F sometimes, depends on if its windy since that wind will be pulling heat away.
Right, and quite a few "keyboard mechanics" have argued wind chill only applies to living flesh. Park your truck on a 10 day in the sun with no wind and the cab will be way warmer than the same temp on a windy day. Even with a dark color the cold wind sucks the heat right out of the sheet metal.
A good rule to live by:
Never argue with a man from Wyoming about wind !

😉
01-05-2019 11:26 AM
DENNY I would take Bugmans advice and get a timer/tune up the the glow plug system. If you are paying the electric bill a timer will pay for itself in month or so. I usually plug in when it gets too below freezing, and have the timer come on 2-3 hours before I want to leave. I may leave it on all night if it is down to -20 or lower, but usually even 2-3 hours works fine at that temp. They make extension cords that have a clear ends that light up when you have power going through the cord. They work great for making sure the outlet/timer is getting power to your truck. Some drape the cord over the drivers side mirror to help remember they are plugged in. If the truck is cold when I plug in my block heater I can hear it working if I put my head down by the driver side tire if I don't have a lighted cord. Make sure you batteries and glow plug system is in good working order in the fall. Remember you can't always plug in when you are away from home.
DENNY
01-05-2019 11:10 AM
bugman The wind does cool things off a lot faster but metal can not be cooled any lower than the ambient temperature that surrounds it.

The effect of wind chill is to increase the rate of heat loss and reduce any warmer objects to the ambient temperature more quickly. It cannot, however, reduce the temperature of these objects below the ambient temperature, no matter how great the wind velocity.

I do agree that a vehicle parked in the sun on a 10 degree day will feel warmer than the outside temperature and if a wind kicks up it is going to cool off but it will go no lower than what the temperature is outside of the vehicle. So it goes from lets say 50 degrees inside temperature down to 10 degrees as the wind blows across the metal of the vehicle. But the inside temperature will get no lower than 10 degrees.
01-05-2019 09:39 AM
LMJD
Quote:
When its my own dime I plug in when its +20*F sometimes, depends on if its windy since that wind will be pulling heat away.
Right, and quite a few "keyboard mechanics" have argued wind chill only applies to living flesh. Park your truck on a 10 day in the sun with no wind and the cab will be way warmer than the same temp on a windy day. Even with a dark color the cold wind sucks the heat right out of the sheet metal.
01-04-2019 10:54 PM
ArcticDriver Heck, I plug in when the temps are even +30*F when its someone elses dime and I will leave it plugged in all night...like at a hotel.

When its my own dime I plug in when its +20*F sometimes, depends on if its windy since that wind will be pulling heat away.

I have read 80% of engine wear occurs during initial cold start, that may be an exaggeration but even if its 50% then its still worth it to me to plug in a couple hours.
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