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Buying a new TV for the RV camper - which is easier on the batteries - a 12V or a regular 110V unit with an inverter? We dry camp a lot and use the TV in the evenings - yes we have a generator but when the sun goes down the generator is off. From what I have seen the cost of the 110v units is better than the 12V TVs - but am more concerned about the batteries lasting longer.
 

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The inverter will waste energy during the conversion process.

I generally find that 12 volt items use less energy than 110 volt items. Designers of 110 volt items assume lots of power is available and don't spend much time or money on saving energy.

Brian Elfert
 

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We use a 400 watt/800 surge inverter run 20" tv dvd vcr combo, sat recv. night lights and alarm clock. We dry camp every weekend in the summer, I run 2 group 27 batt's, I think with every thing going I had 30+ hrs of run time with out regharge. 110 stuff is cheaper to buy and repair, the big thing on an inverter is to use heavy wire on batt hook up to keep the amp loss down. I forgot X-BOX in there too.

Have a good one

Dan
 

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A TV works internally on DC power. The AC powered TV converts the AC to DC in the TV's power supply. The most effiecient way is 12 volt DC TV. VCR's and DVD's are available in the 12 volt DC versions as well.
 

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We currently camp in a 30' Airstream with a 15" LCD TV. Like most computers, it has a "brick" converter that converts AC to 12V DC. I leave it plugged into AC when we have power and plug it into a inverter when we boondock. On the AS trailers, there is a 12V powerpoint by the AC plug that the TV plugs into, so this is convenient. We have no problems running the TV over the weekend. Actually, the biggest drain on the batteries is a furnace fan. AS come with two 24 series batteries so I have more capacity that my old trailer that had one. I also have a Honda 3000 generator that I use when needed to recharge. We usually run ours from 11 am to 2-3 pm so that we don't bother others in camp.

If you really want to learn more about using battery power for appliances, go the THE 12V LIFE website. I don't have the link handy but just search on 12V Life and it will come up.

I do agree with other posts - that 110 appliance are cheaper but not optimized for energy use. However, we found out early in our camping experience that the coffee makers (12 V or 110V are the worst enery users out there!)
 

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Hi o2GVW,

Always use 12v vs a inverter as inverters suck alot of battery.

Why not go solar? I've been 100% solar the past 6yrs and 100% boondock camp for 6mths at a time. No noisey genset usage, in fact I haven't taken my generator the past 5yrs. We camp at 9000ft so we use the furnace each night. Never run out of battery. I use two group 27 12v 105a/hr battery's

I'm going to change too four 6v T-105 battery's this year as the group 27 battery's are not lasting but 3yrs and thats taking them back a couple times to get good new battery's. I'm increasing battery storage incase I want to use solar for the W/D.

I use two Unisolar unbreakable 64w PV's and a MorningStar charge controller. Todays new price, about $750 total delivered.

This year I will be taking my generator with us as I installed a washer and LP dryer. When the generator goes TU then I'll switch to a inverter for this usage.

These solar PV's ruined me on using generators as I love that peace and quite... /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/biggrin.gif


/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smokin.gif
 

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[ QUOTE ]
How about This.

Redi-line 1600 Watt


Tbar

[/ QUOTE ]

Great if you keep your engine running, but just off battery you will have a dead battery in less then 3 hours, can't tell you how many times that we had to jump our work truck because guys forgot they had it running
 

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I have a 12V 13" TV and 12V VCR, one thing to be wary of is the quality of the 12V at the TV connection. The one I have is very sensitive to low voltage and on the battery alone it has some space on the sides due to low voltage at the jack. A heavier gauge wire to the jack would help but who wants to rewire the trailer just to watch TV? I am considering an inverter large enough to run the microwave, we do wally world parking lots frequently on the way from here to there and with no generator, it would be nice to zap a cup of coffee or warm a sandwich.. Since it runs from the trailer battery and that charges off the truck when towing, who cares if it runs down some at night.. If I do, I'll run from two Trojan T-105s instead of the wimpy little 12v deep cycles most trailers come with.
 

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Power consumption is power consumption, no matter whether it is 12v or 120v. However, using an inverter will consume a small amount more than using straight 12v, though I doubt if you would detect the difference. One advantage in using an inverter is that it is available for other 120v devices when needed - size chosen considering other purposes.
 

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Nice job dredging up a 5 year old post. ;)
You'll lose 10% or more of the power going thru an inverter. Small inverters are not that energy efficient. Feel the heat coming off one in operation. That's electricity that you aren't able to use. Not necessarily a non-detectable difference.
Your point about having 120V available for other devices is an appropriate consideration.
 

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Way back in the dark ages when I was in high school I designed and built a 12v dc to 110 volt ac inverter for a science fair. You wouldn't believe the heat sinks that I had to put on it to keep everything cool for one that was powerful enough to operate something like a TV. We even melted some electrical solder on on of the transistors just to show how much heat there was. The better ones now will incorporate a fan in the housing to keep things cool.

It was funny that just yesterday I was out in my garage and found both of the inverters that I had built for that fair. One was in a fancy box with meters and everything, but I was having problems with it so I couldn't enter that one. I entered a plain Jane one with just a sheet metal box that I built but it worked fantastic. I ended up with the fairs Sweepstakes Prize.
 

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Nice job dredging up a 5 year old post. ;)
My thoughts exactly. But, since its already dredged ...........


You'll lose 10% or more of the power going thru an inverter. Small inverters are not that energy efficient. Feel the heat coming off one in operation. That's electricity that you aren't able to use. Not necessarily a non-detectable difference.
There's inverters and then there's inverters. I've owned a couple of Heart Freedoms which were rock solid units that ran pretty cool and made good power. Currently I've got a Magnum that is similar. I've also owned (and still do own) some cheapo Chinese crap inverters which are backup heat sources if the furnace ever goes out.

I'm sure the OP is long gone - LONG gone - but the answer to his question is "Whichever system generates less total heat".
 
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