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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I just picked up a 1993 crew cab, long bed 2wd drw, 5 speed, 7.3l idi turbo truck this weekend. I'm going through replacing all brake components, and running cunifer lines , new hoses drums calipers, cylinders etc and I got to the front and wanted to double check on removing the front rotors.

It seems I must have to remove the bearings and then press/unbolt the hub from the rotor. Is that correct? Do they sell the hubs already attached to the rotor with bearing races for 2wd?

What is the torque sequence for those front bearings? Thanks guys!
 

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I'm not as familiar with 2WD as 4, but I think you have 1-piece hub rotors that are replaced as a unit; usually with wheel bearings (or at least their outer races) preinstalled.
 

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2WD DRW front rotors are one piece. If you buy a new one, the races are pressed in already. You can reuse the bearings but I wouldn't reuse the inner grease seals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Napa, Advanced Auto, and Autozone all said these rotors are just the rotors and not a hub? That's why i am confused. It looks like they might separate, and are bolted from inside of the rotor? I may try to have them turned on the vehicle since they dont seem to look that old, but one is warped. The passenger side was only out .0005" but the driver was about .003" when i rotated them with a dial indicator installed.

I was hoping to actually order some drilled and slotted rotors for the front since they seem to resist warping better and keep pads cleaner. This is a 4200lb front axle. Would the torque specs for bearings be the same as a 4wd? I wouldnt think so. I guess i should buy a manual for this truck, i figured this information would have been readily available on the forms.
 

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The front DRW adapter is bolted on, but it contains no bearings.

Drilling rotors is counterproductive. Slotting was only done to allow venting from poorly-manufactured pads. Pads aren't made that way nowadays, so neither drilling nor slotting improves brake performance or durability on a truck. You get more brake performance for the money from high-quality solid-faced rotors, and even the brake mfrs. who sell drilled & slotted rotors will tell you that. There's an old link in this caption that might still work:



Warping is a totally separate issue, and it comes from 2 things: 1) improper torque procedure on the rotor's lugs, and 2) overheating & splash-cooling the rotor. It can happen to any style of rotor, and drilled/slotted rotors are more-likely to overheat than solid because they contain less metal to dissipate the heat.

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So i removed the hub, unbolt the rotor, then bolt back on and install the bearings again? Is there anything wrong with reusing these bearings? They feel perfectly fine an the grease looked somewhat new. Probably whenever those rotors were put on.

I disagree with the slotting only vents gasses, i feel it also cleans the pads on vehicles that arent driven daily. When the surface rust builds up the pads wear it off, then the slots give it somewhere to go instead of embedding into the pad. The new slotted rotors i put on my suburban are much "healthier" than my wife's brand new 2015 pathfinder rotors after sitting a couple days between being driven.

I understand drilled would heat up quicker but should also cool quicker having holes that will draw in air as the pad passes over them allowing it to vent centrifugally out of the supporting ridges. I have yet to warp a set of good drilled and slotted rotors but have removed many warped solid rotors.

I'm temped to install one drilled and slotted and one sold rotor and do some testing now haha. Test temps via IR gun after hard braking, after braking then coasting. Also seeing if the vehicle begins pulling to one side or the other.
 

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I reused my bearings, that was 6 years and 9,000 miles ago.

I wouldn't run two different styles of rotors on the same axle, maybe it's just me but since my truck sees 90% of its use pulling a 9000 lb fifth wheel, I would hate to find that they act different in a hard stop. Too many other things to be aware of besides a steering wheel issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Oh yeah i didnt mean running it for months or anything. One rotor i'm pretty sure if warped i was thinking of buying the pair, replacing the one and doing some testing one day.

I know on my suburban i replaced the rotors in april and had both drivers side calipers start sticking last month. On 150 mile trip before i noticed it - 4.88s kinda mask any resistance problems when cruising.

When i got back i shot the rotors with an IR gun and the passenger rotors were +160-170F, the drivers were +280-290F. They did not warp at all. When i went to remove the rotors i could turn the tires by hand but not the hub once that leverage was removed. Neither rotor warped or cracked.
 

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On my 98' F150 4x4 I had rotor warping issues all the time (proper torque!) until I put cross-drilled rotors on.

I just put cross-drilled and slotted rotors on my F250 front/rear. Smoothest braking ever. Highly recommended. Sure they can eat pads sooner but who cares, pads are cheap.
 
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