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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

I got a smokin deal on a 1994 f450 (superduty) with a dump bed, and snow plow (ebay) got it delivered the other day and just started messing with it. First off the truck has sat not ran for 5 years. it's a 7.3 factory turbo.

Well I put some batteries in it and it wouldnt crank, the motor would move but only a 1/4 revolution at the most. I put a breaker bar on the crank and same thing. Then I took the glow plugs out and it turns over fine, but there is antifreeze coming from the holes! turns out not such a great deal lol. :

My question is. is there any way to determin what has caused antifreeze to find its way in the cylinders? I only took 6 of 8 glows out due to the turbo blocking access to the last 2. looks like it's coming out of one of the drivers side GP holes. I know about the whole cavitation problem in these motors. But it's only got 98k miles! is there any hope for this motor or should I junk it?
 

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There is a test for cavitation. Search the IDI forum, depending on the temps the engine was subjected to for the last 5 years it could be toast.

Without doing the test or a complete teardown, I don't want to venture a guess.


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If it's been sitting with crappy coolant and corroding for five years that won't have helped either
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah I'm figuring the motor is shot. Just wondering if there was a possibility it isnt. If it matters, the radiator did let out pressure when I opened it. and there doesnt appear to be any water in the oil unless it has settled to the bottom of the pan. At the price I paid for the truck I can keep the plow and part out the rest and still come out ahead, but I would rather save it if possible. any chance it could be a head gasket? I have read that the #8 cylinders are usualy the first to cavitate, looking at the motor which one is that?
 

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Cylinders are numbered front to back P/S 1,3,5,7
D/S 2,4,6,8

IIRC the non turbo engines tend to get water into the rear cylinders through the intake from water collecting on the air cleaner.

Maybe a compression test will help narrow the possibilities.


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Discussion Starter #6
i guess what i'll do is drain the radiator and perform a compression check. Those two glow plugs under the turbo seem impossible to get to! . seemed like the antifreeze was coming out of either #4 or #6 or both. not sure as I wasnt looking under the hood while cranking. just saw it dripping of the inside of the hood afterwards

Think a bottle of that miracle head gasket repair crap would work? lol
 

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i guess what i'll do is drain the radiator and perform a compression check. Those two glow plugs under the turbo seem impossible to get to! . seemed like the antifreeze was coming out of either #4 or #6 or both. not sure as I wasnt looking under the hood while cranking. just saw it dripping of the inside of the hood afterwards

Think a bottle of that miracle head gasket repair crap would work? lol
Save your money, that gasket repair crap is for gassers, not hi compression diesels. Had a 90 that cavitated on # 6. Do the air test on the coolant system. Bring that cyl up to TDC, if you get coolant out the GP right away, it could be the head gasket. With only 98K miles could very well be. Cavitation don't usually show up til after 150K.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well I havent had the chance to do any diagnostics yet. But Ive been thinking.... If it has cavitated I might have the motor resleeved. I think it would be a good investment considering it only has 98k. The internals should be in great shape. Wether I use the engine in this truck or keep it as a spare for another it would be nice to have a low mile replacement ready to drop in. I Have a relative who is a automotive machinest that can do the sleeving I talked to him and he has done it before on these motors. I found a site that sells sleeves for international 7.3's for about $28 a piece. I think it would be worth doing as long as it doesnt have bearing wear or a bent rod I could get away without the expense of a whole rebuild kit.
 

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Sleeving the engine was my first thought if needed, reading your above posts. Usually can get all 8 sleeved for around $1000. Good luck with it.
 

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Just my opinion: but if I was going to go as far as tearing down an engine, I wouldn't re use any bearings or piston rings. You'll have to install them back in their original position.


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Discussion Starter #11
yeah if the truck was in better shape I would consider doing a total rebuild, but this is a old plow truck so it's very rusty. And the PO says he thought the transmission was acting up when he parked it. really I don't have any trucks worth doing a total rebuilt engine now that I think about it, If it needs much more than sleeves it's going to the scrapper, or to someone who needs a core.
 

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With only 98K miles on, you wouldn't have to do a full rebuild. The pistons, rods and crank have to come out, but just keep parts together, mark the pistons which hole they came out of, if the bearings look bad, replace them. A little hone in the cyl's will reseat the rings. Just a matter of inspection. It'll probably run another 900,000 miles.
 

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You NEVER use old rings on a new sleeve job. Your rods should already be numbered like most any other engine.
 

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You NEVER use old rings on a new sleeve job. Your rods should already be numbered like most any other engine.

I agree, but if I read bills post, he was saying just hone the cylinders and put the old rings/pistons back in.


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Pistons of course if they're OK, but whether the sleeves are pre-honed by the installer or honed after the machine shop work, reusing old rings is not done in a shop.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for the info guys, my machine shop guy would be doing all the internal work as far as assembly and rings. I'm just bringing him the Long block and letting him take it from there. That is if it does fail the cylinder check. But I'm still hoping it's just a head Gasket! Gonna mess with it this weekend. I got a radiator pressure checker from a friend. wish me luck!
 
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