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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's a 2002 F250 Super Duty 7.3 diesel. Sometimes it just quits while going down the road then won't start and other times it won't start after driving it and turning it off. Sometimes I can drive to town, stop and start more than once, and get home (30 miles) with no problems.

In both cases it turns over and spins the engine fine. New batteries less than a year ago and new starter less than 3 months ago.

Let it sit for 30 minutes or longer and it starts like a new truck. I swear it only turns over 3 times and fires right up and runs great until one of the 2 situations mentioned above.

I've replaced the 2 solenoids on the top of the engine and cleaned all the ground connections I could find under the hood. I've done some research and there are so many parts, CPS, IPR, ICP, CPM, fuel bowl heater element..... that I'd like to narrow it down a little before I start "throwing parts" at it. I don't have test equipment other than a multi-meter.

It's almost as though something is heating up and when it gets to a certain temperature that's it. Sometimes I make it to my destination just before it gets to that temp and other times it quits before I do. Let it cool and all is well?
 

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That sounds like your IPR solenoid is heating up and going open circuit. Next time try pouring ice water on the IPR solenoid - I bet it will start up.

If that works, recommend getting a motorcraft IPR from a reputable seller. Lots of knock-offs out there.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great idea! Thanks. I'm new to diesels so everything is a learning opportunity for me.

So to be clear, there is the solenoid and there is the valve, right?
Are they within the same part?
 

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They are. The solenoid with the electrical connector on it slides on the valve itself.

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
my post in the wrong forum and the response.........


I believe I have a blown head gasket, anti-freeze looks like a vanilla milk shake, so Ive got it in the shop for that but the intermittent no start is driving me crazy.
7.3L's rarely blow head gaskets. More than likely the oil in your coolant is from bad oil cooler o-rings. You could talk to the shop to be sure they don't just go replacing head gaskets before checking the oil cooler.

If you have tech questions, please put them in the appropriate forum.

Welcome to TheDieselStop
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What is the best way to determine if I have a head gasket problem vs an oil cooler issue?

Compression test? Bubbles in the radiator? Oil leakage around the cooler? The "shop" I'm using is another shade tree mechanic who has a lot of experience and he may know how but I've gotten such good info so far I'd like your opinion.

If I'm not in the right forum let me know.
 

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If it were a head gasket, you'd likely smell combustion products in the degas bottle. There's also a test kit available to detect combustion products in the coolant. There aren't any pressurized oil passages thru the head gasket area, so there's really no way a blown head gasket would put oil into the coolant.
My money is on the oil cooler. There are two large o-rings on each header, one between the coolant and oil passages and another to the outside (don't recall whether coolant or oil is on the outside of the tube bundle.) Your issue would be the inner o-rings, which could leak oil into the coolant without anything showing up on the outside.

You're in the right place. (y)
 

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It's a 2002 F250 Super Duty 7.3 diesel. Sometimes it just quits while going down the road then won't start and other times it won't start after driving it and turning it off. Sometimes I can drive to town, stop and start more than once, and get home (30 miles) with no problems.

In both cases it turns over and spins the engine fine. New batteries less than a year ago and new starter less than 3 months ago.

Let it sit for 30 minutes or longer and it starts like a new truck. I swear it only turns over 3 times and fires right up and runs great until one of the 2 situations mentioned above.

I've replaced the 2 solenoids on the top of the engine and cleaned all the ground connections I could find under the hood. I've done some research and there are so many parts, CPS, IPR, ICP, CPM, fuel bowl heater element..... that I'd like to narrow it down a little before I start "throwing parts" at it. I don't have test equipment other than a multi-meter.

It's almost as though something is heating up and when it gets to a certain temperature that's it. Sometimes I make it to my destination just before it gets to that temp and other times it quits before I do. Let it cool and all is well?
When my new 2002 F-250 Power Stroke had less than 3000 miles had similar problem. Put in reverse engine quit, but would start right up. Would shut down when driving. Had into the Ford dealer several times, they changed out everything you all have mentioned above, CPS, IDM, etc... They finally put in new computer. Drove 15 miles engine stalled. Restarted and took to another Ford dealer. The mechanic crawled up on top of the engine, found a wiring harness up near the turbo. Wrapped with elec tape and zip tied so it couldn't move that truck hasn't skipped a beat in 20 years now, 313,000 miles. Apparently bare spot on harness was arcing every time transmission went into reverse that's why dealer's computer gave them something different every time it was in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If it were a head gasket, you'd likely smell combustion products in the degas bottle. There's also a test kit available to detect combustion products in the coolant. There aren't any pressurized oil passages thru the head gasket area, so there's really no way a blown head gasket would put oil into the coolant.
My money is on the oil cooler. There are two large o-rings on each header, one between the coolant and oil passages and another to the outside (don't recall whether coolant or oil is on the outside of the tube bundle.) Your issue would be the inner o-rings, which could leak oil into the coolant without anything showing up on the outside.

You're in the right place. (y)
That makes total sense and is such good information. I had the oil cooler oil cooler replaced 2 years ago when the oil filter end cap developed a crack.

Definitely going for the oil cooler o-rings next.

THANKS!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If it were a head gasket, you'd likely smell combustion products in the degas bottle. There's also a test kit available to detect combustion products in the coolant. There aren't any pressurized oil passages thru the head gasket area, so there's really no way a blown head gasket would put oil into the coolant.
My money is on the oil cooler. There are two large o-rings on each header, one between the coolant and oil passages and another to the outside (don't recall whether coolant or oil is on the outside of the tube bundle.) Your issue would be the inner o-rings, which could leak oil into the coolant without anything showing up on the outside.

You're in the right place. (y)
Drained and flushed the engine oil and the coolant. Ran it for a couple of hours and seemed OK. I drove 20 miles to home, stopped at the mailbox and left it running. It shut off and wouldn't start. Got it home. Kept blowing the 30 amp starter fuse. Found a problem at the starter connection wires, replaced the connectors and solved the problem. More oil in the coolant. Took it back and now he thinks it's oil leaking from the "oil cooler portion of the radiator"...... I know there is an oil cooler attached to the block, which was replaced about a year ago.

Is there also an oil cooling section in the radiator? I thought that was for trans fluid.

The radiator is pretty gunked up so I'm thinking replace it.

Thoughts????
 

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There is an oil-to-water cooler in the bottom of the radiator, but that would typically turn your coolant in to pink froth from ATF getting into it. I had one crack on my truck and it took out the tranny. The coolant mixed into the ATF wasn't very good lubrication.
If it's engine oil in your coolant, then it's likely the engine mounted oil cooler (again?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So, oil-to-water, trans fluid not engine oil? My guy is convinced it's an additional engine oil cooler. I'm still thinking engine mounted oil cooler like you.

Pulling the radiator so we will soon confirm.
 
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