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Hey guys. Brand new. Actually don't even have my 250 yet. I'm hopping Monday or Tuesday. Doing Aton of research on these trucks.
I watched and read a few guys who change there oil themselves. 2 different guys drained the oil (kept the oil filter on) poured in rottela T triple. They then drove around for a 20-30 mins and then drained that, changed the oil filter to a ford and then poured in rottela T6. Is this normally. Is this necessary or should this be done every other or third oil change. Thanks guys.
 

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Other than creating huge amounts of waste oil, what did they think this is supposed to accomplish?
 

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That sounds like a thorough waste of time and money.

I suppose I could see doing that once IF they had accidentally installed a non-diesel rated oil or some damaging oil additive and wanted to thoroughly remove it.

Otherwise, changing your oil at 5K Oil Change Intervals (OCI) with a quality oil like T6 and a Motorcraft oil filter is MORE than sufficient.

Save your extra greenbacks for other repairs...which will certainly be waiting.
 

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If that really gave any real results we all would be doing it. Just run the factory fill oil till you get the oil change message. After that do what you can afford to pay for in oil.
 
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ABSOLUTE waste of oil and money, on another forum years ago a new guy came on and thought he would impress everyone by saying that he used synthetic oil and changed it every 1500 miles. Obviuosly he got called on it big time and basically got laughed off the forum, never heard from him again. Now if the guys that are doing what you said think it will help their truck and they have the money to waste then by all means have at it.......but like said by numerous above, just isn't necessary. Use a good proven oil and the Ford filter and you're good to go.
 

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I can be about as OCD as anyone. I have loosened bed bolts and cab bolts and aligned those to perfection on several of my trucks. I do realize that OCD satisfying standard is not even achieved by LEXUS or anyone else purportedly relentlessly pursuing perfection so I do these things myself. The dealer techs would likely not satisfy my standard. I can't bring myself to drain and refill and flush an engine like described. A far more worthwhile activity with more meaningful result would be to take that time and align all the screws on the switch plate an outlet covers in your house. In fact, all those initial runs with aerated oil from the excessive oil changes could be damaging so instead aligning the screws on electrical items might make your engine last longer.
 

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What you describe these guys doing is overkill, but I did dump the factory fill at 1500 miles in mine to get rid of the wear-in metals and then went with a normal OCI (about 5,000 miles). While it has not been proven one way or the other if this is a beneficial to engine longevity, the UOA shows the amount of metal in the oil and (for me) I want it out of there. YMMV!
 

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What you describe these guys doing is overkill, but I did dump the factory fill at 1500 miles in mine to get rid of the wear-in metals and then went with a normal OCI (about 5,000 miles). While it has not been proven one way or the other if this is a beneficial to engine longevity, the UOA shows the amount of metal in the oil and (for me) I want it out of there. YMMV!
Your signature says you are getting an axle temperature gauge?

Aren't those just for big rigs?

I have never heard of a rear axle overheating on a light truck.
 

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Your signature says you are getting an axle temperature gauge? Aren't those just for big rigs?
Not necessarily. It depends on how much data that you want to acquire and what you want to monitor. Towing a fifth wheel into the mountains in the heat of the summer can raise the axle temperature up quite high, but most people never know that because there is no way to capture the temperatures. Knowing the axle temperatures can also allow you to use a lighter viscosity oil when not towing (such as a 75W-110 or even a 75W-90) and increase your MPG to a small extent. While many will see the axle temperature as a "nice to have", I like having the data. The more important question is why the 2011-2016 6.7L engines do not have an oil pressure gauge. The 2017 models are purported to have one--it just seems strange that they do not all have one. I am installing an Amsoil bypass filter system and will be installing an oil pressure gauge at the same time when the temperatures outdoors warm up a little. :D
 

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Your signature says you are getting an axle temperature gauge?

Aren't those just for big rigs?

I have never heard of a rear axle overheating on a light truck.
Back in the 70's and 80's, the only time i ever saw it was on one that just had the wrong fluid in it, or was bad over loaded.. especially when ran for any long distances on the highway... Climate has some to do with the issue also, as Texas heat can some times be relentless.. My 97' f-350 would burn the fluid in about 15k miles or so, until i went to synthetic.. Trucks with heavy service beds on them, and being kept on the highway seem to be the most common i have seen do it.. I figure higher road speeds, more powerful engines, and longer travel distances are playing a role in the issue..
 
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I am installing an Amsoil bypass filter system and will be installing an oil pressure gauge at the same time when the temperatures outdoors warm up a little. :D
I am interested in doing the bypass filter as well. Had one on my 04 F150. Where are you planning on mounting it? Please post up some pics once you get it installed.
 

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I am interested in doing the bypass filter as well. Had one on my 04 F150. Where are you planning on mounting it? Please post up some pics once you get it installed.
I am still deciding that one. My brother is in the industrial hose/belt/gasket business and so my hoses are free (I bought the parts to the bypass kit as opposed to the turn-key kit to save on cost). I will probably mount it to the frame with a custom mounting bracket and have some filter "shields" fabricated to protect the filters. The only thing that I do not like about the Amsoil system is that it will not allow you to use the factory full flow filter (which has a 1" inlet); you have to use the Amsoil filter (or equivalent) which has a 3/4" inlet. This is likely not a problem for flow, but I have a stash of filters that I will have to sell that I would rather use. I will definitely post some pictures. I plan to install a remote filter on the power steering and the transmission too.
 
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