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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1994 F250 IDI factory turbo
Just two weeks ago I noticed oil pressure guage going nuts ,So i checked my oil 5 quarts low ! Burns ? Leaks?
Its been 7,000 miles since change so
I changed my oil and filter (Wix Filter )
10 quarts of oil (2 quarts lucus stabilizer) Still at idle 1000 rpm Oil pressure guage is jumping around a ton
But at 1100-1200 and above its normal
Could my oil pump be going out? What can I check ?
 

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Is this the factory gauge or an aftermarket?

Any oil in coolant?

Does the upper radiator hose become hard when it's up to temperature?

If everything is is fine maybe the oil seal in the turbo failed internally and is just burning up the oil or sending it down the exhaust.
 

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Its been 7,000 miles since change so
I changed my oil and filter (Wix Filter )
10 quarts of oil (2 quarts lucus stabilizer) Still at idle 1000 rpm Oil pressure guage is jumping around a ton
You never checked the oil level in 7000 miles? My my. 5 Qts low, the rest must have been close to just about sludge using that Lucas.

Why are you using Lucas stabilizer? Read Below.

What brand and Viscosity oil are you using?

What filter, is it comparable to the FL1995 Ford filter?

READ
Yes, but what about Lucas Oil Stabilizer?
Isn't it used extensively in drag racing? Yes it is, and it's a unique category in oil additives with a milder version of deception. With high-alcohol fuels and high horsepower, there is a huge problem with the engine oil becoming rapidly diluted (thinned out) by the alcohol. To combat this problem, drag racers commonly use a very heavy racing oil (like 60 weight), then add Lucas to the oil because it increases the viscosity even more. That way, as the oil is being rapidly diluted going down the dragstrip, when they back off the throttle it might be a 30 or 40 weight oil instead of a 10 or 20 weight oil that would allow a lot of engine damage.
Now, what does ANY of that have to do with your vehicle? NOTHING ! Adding their product to your oil will increase the weight (viscosity) of your engine oil, which will decrease your fuel economy and increase your oil pressure. Increasing the oil pressure beyond the 30 or 40 weight that the engine's designed for doesn't help you. In fact, it's a negative because it adds load to your starter and battery, especially in cold weather, and it makes your engine wear faster. That's right - your engine wears faster for two main reasons: because during cold starts it takes longer to get the oil to all the components, and the higher oil pressure drop across your oil filter means that more of the oil will bypass the filter than normally occurs while your engine is warming up during driving. So you're pumping additional wear particles through the engine rather than filtering them out.

The deception is that they want you to assume that what's good in a top-fuel dragster is good for your engine, without actually making that claim on their bottle.





Yes, but what about Lucas Oil Stabilizer?

Isn't it used extensively in drag racing? Yes it is, and it's a unique category in oil additives with a milder version of deception. With high-alcohol fuels and high horsepower, there is a huge problem with the engine oil becoming rapidly diluted (thinned out) by the alcohol. To combat this problem, drag racers commonly use a very heavy racing oil (like 60 weight), then add Lucas to the oil because it increases the viscosity even more. That way, as the oil is being rapidly diluted going down the dragstrip, when they back off the throttle it might be a 30 or 40 weight oil instead of a 10 or 20 weight oil that would allow a lot of engine damage.



Now, what does ANY of that have to do with your vehicle? NOTHING ! Adding their product to your oil will increase the weight (viscosity) of your engine oil, which will decrease your fuel economy and increase your oil pressure. Increasing the oil pressure beyond the 30 or 40 weight that the engine's designed for doesn't help you. In fact, it's a negative because it adds load to your starter and battery, especially in cold weather, and it makes your engine wear faster. That's right - your engine wears faster for two main reasons: because during cold starts it takes longer to get the oil to all the components, and the higher oil pressure drop across your oil filter means that more of the oil will bypass the filter than normally occurs while your engine is warming up during driving. So you're pumping additional wear particles through the engine rather than filtering them out.



The deception is that they want you to assume that what's good in a top-fuel dragster is good for your engine, without actually making that claim on their bottle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Factory gauge and No oil in coolant that I know of , and After I discovered it 5 qts low is when i decided to go ahead and Change Oil (15-40 ) Forgot brand , and The First Time Ive ever used Lucus
Hoping it would fix oil pressure wich it did not
 

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The factory oil pressure gauge is not a gauge just a switch that closes at 7psi. Check the wiring to it on top of your turbo. My factory gauge reads nothing but mechanical shows 12psi hot idle and 32psi cruising at 60mph. I saw a huge drum in oil pressure with Lucan stabilizer. I never use it in engines, I used it in my deuce and a half transfer cause and that's it. I use rotella t6 synthetic oil and it works well, 5w 40.
 

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You have one or more cylinders not hitting. Crack the injector lines at the injectors one at a time. Just like pulling a plug wire off to find the miss. When the engine doesn't bog down, that cylinder isn't hitting. Find the culprits, then we'll go from there.
 

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Probably. The seals between the bearings, and the compressor/turbine chambers can and do wear out. They aren't hard to rebuild, just be careful not to bend anything, because the balance is extremely important for the turbine wheels due to the speed at which they turn.
 

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Yea but why is it burning oil bad ?
Turbo eating it ?
When your oil level was 5 qts low, it's possible that the OP was sucking air,(making the Oil gauge go wild). Turbos need a lot of oil flow to keep the bearings cool. More than likely the bearings and thrust bearing is shot, that's why your getting a lot of smoke, it's burning the oil out the turbo. Hope the turbo is not an ATS, there are no parts available for them now, except thru Type4 on here is the only one I know of that might have parts, he bought all that ATS had when they stopped making turbos. He does rebuild them, he's in Oregon. Haven't seen him on here for quite a while, he's on the OB diesel forum tho.

I'd change your oil and get that Lucas out of there.
 

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As long as the shaft, housings and turbine/compressor wheels haven't been damaged, the bearings can be obtained through a bearing supply store, and the slip rings/seals can be matched up through a turbo rebuild shop. It's not like they weren't a standard size from somewhere. Don't just look to automotive sources to find parts, the stuff you'll need is everywhere you just need to find it. That size turbo was used on many industrial engines as well as automotive. They may not be the same brand, but many of the parts will safely interchange. It all depends on how good you are with a micrometer
 

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As long as the shaft, housings and turbine/compressor wheels haven't been damaged, the bearings can be obtained through a bearing supply store, and the slip rings/seals can be matched up through a turbo rebuild shop. It's not like they weren't a standard size from somewhere. Don't just look to automotive sources to find parts, the stuff you'll need is everywhere you just need to find it. That size turbo was used on many industrial engines as well as automotive. They may not be the same brand, but many of the parts will safely interchange. It all depends on how good you are with a micrometer
Far as I know, ATS never made turbos anyway. From all the old ATS paperwork I still have, they've always used Garrett turbos, which is one of the bigger turbo mfgr, doubt if they suddenly went out of business. Mine has a Garrett tag and part number, no mention of ATS on it. IIRC in ATS (Garrett) applications, they don't use bearings anyway, bronze bushings are used which as you wrote, they too would be easy to obtain.
 

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Factory turbo is a Garrett. I have a spare center section, and rebuild kits can be bought from gpop.com
 

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Yessir, Chuck, I forgot to mention to the OP in case he didn't know, the factory system is an ATS kit with some minor differences. If I was him, I'd check for rotor radial play and if OK look elsewhere. Turbos and their bushings, seals, etc, don't go bad very often.
 

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For information. WE did build turbos at LEP for one year, don't remember when as I was only involved with the load cells which measured the force of pressing the wheels on. Hell, at 87 it's hard to remember what happened yesterday. Now where did I put that bolt, just had it a minute ago.
 

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With the engine running, loosen one at a time each injector fuel line, should make the engine like loose power on a good injector, no change equals a bad injector. On a warm engine, sometimes a line will get real hot, that's a stuck open injector.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I will have to try that
I am now getting fuel in my oil cause my oil level is going up and now its leaking
So i checked my temps at startup on the head at exhuast manifold and one was 20 degrees cooler so replaced that one
it did nothing !
 

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If your getting fuel in your oil, I would be looking at the lift pump.
 
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