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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I'm relatively handy at working on rigs of various types (1995 Chevy Wagon, 1991 Alfa Romeo 164, 1977 Chev Pickup), but I've only done a bit on our 1986 Ford F250. I've replaced the mechanical fuel pump, starter, steering gearbox, ignition switch assembly. Now I'm tackling the water pump, and am a bit intimidated by that big reverse thread nut. My Chilton book is not very helpful, and I can't afford to screw this up, as this is our working farm pickup...and it's winter. I have no garage, luckily the weather is benign at the moment. I'm in Eastern Oregon. I've read a thread from 2010, and hoping for any other warnings or encouragement y'all might have!

Thanks immensely.

Vurronika
 

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The correct tools can usually be borrowed from local auto parts stores with a deposit.

For i stallation, the most important thing with any mating surface is to clean it well by scraping/removing old gasket material or sealant and then make certain the two surfaces are dry of any fluids.

I am sure more thorough suggestions will follow.
 

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I'm not an expert on that model, but I'd say to borrow every tool they have that you think might possibly work, and try them all until you figure out what will work.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks! I'm very accustomed to that scrupulously clean surface, having done water pumps and other things (and being a woman, I often got that job). I've just never encountered that big 'ol reverse thread nut...or a fan shroud that wasn't in two pieces. I will go beg at my local parts house for tools if it comes to it...I'm really happy to be here because I'm just learning about diesels...

V
 

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The tools make the job possible since they provide strong leverage and a secure contact. They are long and help keep your hands out of pinch points as well.

The fan blades have very sharp edges. Best to wear leather gloves.
 

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The tool makes it a lot easier. If you tell them what you are working on they will know what tool to give you. It is not as hard as it looks.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I am happy to report that I have a VERY good friend at the local NAPA who always knows exactly what tool I need and explains how to use it. You know, when one is female, it is nice to be taken seriously. SO. I held the water pump pulley bolts "grabber", and the big reverse thread nut wrench, and had my husband hit the nut wrench until the nut broke loose. I had put penetrating oil on it for 2 days and it still took force to break it loose. I've got everything out of the way and am now waiting on the new water pump. I'm cleaning the "mating" surface now. And as my friend at Napa said, I have never seen such a big pee hole on a water pump in my life! I am just learning the joy of having the right tool for the job - it really makes all the difference, doesn't it?

Fun to be on this forum. I look forward to learning a lot about this old farm truck. I love machinery, I just don't like doing a job when I don't have the right tool or the know-how. I can't believe how many things I had to move to get to this pump. I thought my 1995 Chevy wagon V8 was bad. Not really. Thanks and will report back when the truck is fired up again.

V.
 
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