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What do you say DieselJay? Isn´t this a good symbol of what have happened during the last 50 years in US car industry? /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/shrug.gif

"The car was seen as a method of acquainting twenty-first century citizens with a suitable representation of 1957 civilization. According to event chairman Lewis Roberts Sr., the Plymouth was chosen because it was "an advanced product of American industrial ingenuity with the kind of lasting appeal that will still be in style 50 years from now." "2 ton gas-gussler." Ten and out.

Buried car

The leaking concret might be a symbol of US quality...
But sheer up, /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/laugh.gif when you are down the normal way is up.
 

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It seems that maybe a 57 plymouth did not hold the greatest promise for the future of the auto industry. What is for sure is that the vault they used to enclose this time capsule was not up to the task.
 

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I found it funny that they thought a tank of gas wouldn't go bad in 50 years.
Kind of sad really to see that car all covered in water, mud, and rust. At least some of the papers are OK. I did notice though that the vault didn't stand much of a chance with this tree nearby.
 

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this '57 Plymouth was better built than the construction of the vault.
Sort of like comparing ANY vehicle's condition to the CARE it received when it was running.This car received poor car when it was kept in the vault. Even these US-car-hater's dream machine would be a piece of garbage if maintained like this Plymouth was.
Sounds like the real fault lies in the Construction industry...poor construction planning and work means even the best designed products can be affected.
The 57 Plymouth was a good car when compared to it's peer vehicles.
 

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They should have used a whole lot of those silica moisture packets we get with our electronic devices,, buried it in those, then the concrete/and dirt. LOL
 

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Is that Christine ?
 

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Too bad the car was ruined when they pulled it out of the time capsule. I guess time capsule technology was not at it's peak in 1957. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/biggrin.gif
 

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"The 57 Plymouth was a good car when compared to it's peer vehicles."

Not exactly!

Even the most ardent classic MoPars fans agree that the '57 Plymouth was something of a lemon. There were numerous quality control issues (water leaks, squeaks, rattles, poor soft trim) and the cars rusted out prematurely.

The '57 Plymouth sold very well but here in the midwest they were all but extinct by the early 1960's. The survival rate (percentage of cars produced that are still operable) of the '57 Plymouth is dismal when compared to the Chevy and Ford offerings for that year. All of which makes the poor condition of "Miss Belvedere" even more sad.
 

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Well I went and saw the whole deal......what a BUMMER /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/frown.gif

HUGE PILE OF RUST AND JUNK!!!

The car show around it was cool though /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smokin.gif
 

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Just about any older car is all but extinct in Wisconsin. Rust/salt will humble any older car. No undercoat...no galvanizing.
I believe a '57 Plymouth was like most '57 cars....a bit of "good old days" attitude will let a person remember them with nostalgia.
I never was a Dodge?Chrysler/Plymouth/Desoto fan....I lump them in with a Buick/Pontiac/Olds/Cadillac/Chevrolet.
I like a Ford much better. I had a '57 Ford pickup, and it STILL runs good...sold it to a buddy.
The time capsule vault is the real problem here. Even a Toyota would rust in there! (sarcasm off).
 

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[ QUOTE ]
The leaking concret might be a symbol of US quality...

[/ QUOTE ]

I'm sure if they used CGI all would have been well.
 

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I'm originally from Tulsa, and the thing about that part of town is that it's mighty tough to keep anything dry underground there. That part of town is on top of the Arkansas River aquifer -- the river is so old that most of its flow is actually underground! Water tables are high, soil conditions are such that it's mighty tough to keep a basement under a house (result: most houses there, certainly those built since WWII, don't have basements), and water infiltration is going to be a concern for any underground installation.

That said, from what I understand of the vault for the Belvedere, it was built using the best knowledge available at the time. Unfortunately, monolithic cast reinforced concrete at that scale was not an option in 1957, so the vault was made of pieces that were mortared/grouted/sealed together, and the lid was 3 pieces also grouted. Result: soil movement/settling cracked the vault at the joints and allowed water infiltration. Rather a lot of it -- I'm sure it was full to the top several times based on the witness marks in the photos.

If someone were to repeat the attempt (and actually, a '98 Plymouth Prowler is sealed in an above-ground crypt for a time capsule celebrating Tulsa's Centennial -- it's to be opened in 2048 -- using current state-of-the-art preservation technology: fluids drained and replaced with inert substances, plastic bagged the car which was evacuated and filled with an inert gas, and kept above ground to prevent moisture infiltration), I'm sure they'd use a monolithic "bathtub" vault, prepare the soil around/underneath it with drainage/evacuation, and seal the whole thing up better.

Let's face it: the collective "we" know a lot more now than we knew then. In those days, corrosion protection was a coat of paint, metal fatigue was just starting to be understood, and water sealing was butyl rubber and pitch/tar.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
The leaking concret might be a symbol of US quality...

[/ QUOTE ]

I'm sure if they used CGI all would have been well.

[/ QUOTE ]LMAO! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/biggrin.gif
 

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[ QUOTE ]
I'm originally from Tulsa, and the thing about that part of town is that it's mighty tough to keep anything dry underground there. That part of town is on top of the Arkansas River aquifer -- the river is so old that most of its flow is actually underground! Water tables are high, soil conditions are such that it's mighty tough to keep a basement under a house (result: most houses there, certainly those built since WWII, don't have basements), and water infiltration is going to be a concern for any underground installation.

That said, from what I understand of the vault for the Belvedere, it was built using the best knowledge available at the time. Unfortunately, monolithic cast reinforced concrete at that scale was not an option in 1957, so the vault was made of pieces that were mortared/grouted/sealed together, and the lid was 3 pieces also grouted. Result: soil movement/settling cracked the vault at the joints and allowed water infiltration. Rather a lot of it -- I'm sure it was full to the top several times based on the witness marks in the photos.

If someone were to repeat the attempt (and actually, a '98 Plymouth Prowler is sealed in an above-ground crypt for a time capsule celebrating Tulsa's Centennial -- it's to be opened in 2048 -- using current state-of-the-art preservation technology: fluids drained and replaced with inert substances, plastic bagged the car which was evacuated and filled with an inert gas, and kept above ground to prevent moisture infiltration), I'm sure they'd use a monolithic "bathtub" vault, prepare the soil around/underneath it with drainage/evacuation, and seal the whole thing up better.

Let's face it: the collective "we" know a lot more now than we knew then. In those days, corrosion protection was a coat of paint, metal fatigue was just starting to be understood, and water sealing was butyl rubber and pitch/tar.

[/ QUOTE ]

VERY VERY TRUE

Around here you can dig a water well within 10ft. LOL
 

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Maybe they could put it on one of those 3am chrome polish informercials with that short English guy that bounces around the set like a 3 year old on a sugar high.
 

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I heard on the news last night that somebody bought the car.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
The leaking concret might be a symbol of US quality...

[/ QUOTE ]

I'm sure if they used CGI all would have been well.

[/ QUOTE ]LMAO! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/biggrin.gif

[/ QUOTE ]


/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif CGI solves all problems now!!! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
 
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