The Diesel Stop banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just curious if anyone could tell me if I would have any issues with upgrading to a slightly higher output alternator in place of a stock one in a '02 7.3 f250. I was thinking about a 185 or 190 amp from DC Power when I do upgrade. Thoughts anyone? Thanks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,378 Posts
There will be no issues. The amperage rating is the max rating the alternator is capable of. The voltage regulator will keep the charging rate where you need it. Its just the ability to have the extra reserve when you need it. Like having a F250 instead of a toy-ota - gets you from point a to point b, but has the reserve if you need to haul more than groceries...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,679 Posts
Just curious if anyone could tell me if I would have any issues with upgrading to a slightly higher output alternator in place of a stock one in a '02 7.3 f250. I was thinking about a 185 or 190 amp from DC Power when I do upgrade. Thoughts anyone? Thanks.
Ford thinks there is an issue. On vehicles with dual alternators, they turn one of them off whenever the glow plugs are activated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Yeah I guess I missed the point. Are you saying the stock output of the duals is too high so they have to cut it in half while activating the glow plugs? Does this suggest that stock output of the single is too high? I'm not a mechanic so I learn as I go. Sorry. Appreciate any help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks. Just curious why I hear people using 200 amp or more alternators? How are they doing this if it's a problem? I thought regulators would just pass off the extra juice based on one reply. Can you answer this?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,378 Posts
When the glow plugs activate, with the stock system, the voltage drops down to about 11.5. 444-4D is correct in his assertion that a higher amp alternator could cause an issue here. I'm being brave in making an assumption that this is what he is referring to. The higher amp alternator is going to be able to keep up with the load slightly better, although is still won't bring the voltage up to 12.5 (a 12v batteries resting voltage) - but the increased current theoretically could shorten the life of the glow plugs. In practice, we don't see a lot of exploding glow plugs on trucks with higher amp alternators. Of course, most people upgrade to the 130-160 amp range. If you put on a 500 amp alternator, you might be able to fry them...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Emailed BERU, the Motorcraft glow plug supplier, said there is not issue as long as the entire charging system is maintained correctly. Also called Odyssey about the 110A alternator on our trucks. Said it cannot keep up with the battery needs. I am upgrading to a large case 160A from QuickStart. Food for thought.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
When I put a Leece-Neville alternator on my 7.3, did some research about the effect on the old-style 11 volt BERU glow plugs in my 99 build.
My simple-minded solution is to wait for the glow plugs to turn off before engaging the starter.
I learned that the instrument panel glow plug indicator lamp has nothing to do with what the computer does with the glow plug power-up time.
So I installed an old analog DC voltmeter.
When I turn the key on, it is very obvious that the glow plug relay is on, as the voltage drops down below 12.
Watching the voltmeter needle, it kicks back to the other side of “12” when the glow plug relay opens.
At that time I start the engine.
I don’t think it matters that the new alternator can put 250A @13.8volts back into topping up the batteries, as the glow plugs are off at that point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
I upgraded to a 190 amp on my Excursion,I feel the Excursion should of had a bigger one from the start. I have had no problems with the bigger one. I would do like was mentioned earlier and add a another grounding point ( more due to age from the other ones rotting off and just giving you a known good ground) and up-size the charge wire if going 140 or bigger.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,332 Posts
When I put a Leece-Neville alternator on my 7.3, did some research about the effect on the old-style 11 volt BERU glow plugs in my 99 build.
My simple-minded solution is to wait for the glow plugs to turn off before engaging the starter.
I learned that the instrument panel glow plug indicator lamp has nothing to do with what the computer does with the glow plug power-up time.
So I installed an old analog DC voltmeter.
When I turn the key on, it is very obvious that the glow plug relay is on, as the voltage drops down below 12.
Watching the voltmeter needle, it kicks back to the other side of “12” when the glow plug relay opens.
At that time I start the engine.
I don’t think it matters that the new alternator can put 250A @13.8volts back into topping up the batteries, as the glow plugs are off at that point.
Actually the glow plugs can cycle on several more times after the engine is started, depending on EOT. It was designed into the system to reduce start up smoke.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
24,883 Posts
Actually the glow plugs can cycle on several more times after the engine is started, depending on EOT. It was designed into the system to reduce start up smoke.
No, the glow plugs are one-shot on SuperDuty's.
You're thinking of the OBS Powerstroke glow plug system that does cycle. Superduty's built after Dec 98 have an intake air heater that turns on at low ambient temps and extended idle to reduce smoke. Even when the oil temp is below zero, the Superduty glow plugs only stay on for a maximum of 2 minutes.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top