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Personally I think the floor of the bed should be steel.
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Why not aluminum and then Line-X it? Then you get something that is stronger than just steel but is still lighter.
 

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Why not aluminum and then Line-X it? Then you get something that is stronger than just steel but is still lighter.
That's what I did, but Line-X is heavy, so the net is the bed is probably a bit heavier than steel. However, now you've added a very tough shield that will protect it for a very long time!
 

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That's what I did, but Line-X is heavy, so the net is the bed is probably a bit heavier than steel. However, now you've added a very tough shield that will protect it for a very long time!

I would Line-X it either way.
 

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You may want to consider Line-X over the factory spray in liner. Here's a Youtube video showing the difference.

 

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Had mine lined from day one, landscaping and i don’t baby the bed - I also don’t beat it like an idiot and drop heavy things into it. No complaints at all. Why not pay the 500-700 to have a work truck protected and not worry about scratching it?
 

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I have a liner so no issues thus far. The hood is a whole different story. Anyone else notice the flutter in high winds, sometimes I think the dang thing is going to rip back into the windshield.
 

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I have a liner so no issues thus far. The hood is a whole different story. Anyone else notice the flutter in high winds, sometimes I think the dang thing is going to rip back into the windshield.
Yes, but that's not a new thing. My '02 did the same thing. All in the name of saving weight.
 

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I haven't Line-X'd my steel bed yet, mainly because I don't want to have to chip the LineX off if I have to weld something to the bed. And, I didn't want moisture and microscopic corrosion to get trapped between the LineX and the steel. With paint, at least I can see what's going on with the metal under the paint. With thick LineX, that isn't possible.

I have an aftermarket bed, with 10 gauge steel wall thickness, and I keep a sheet of 3/4" plywood, primed and painted on all 6 sides, on the bottom of the bed, so denting has never really been an issue.

However, the issue that guys I run across with the Ford aluminum beds have isn't the dents... it is the tears and ruptures that leave open holes. It's when they start seeing daylight through the bed wall that they start complaining, not just scratches and dents. The post 1980 Ford stamped steel beds scratched and dented almost as easily, but the steel didn't rupture and rip like the Ford aluminum beds. Not even the newest, thinnest, post 2011 steel.

Now, going back to the 1950's and 60's steel... faggedabout it. Those beds could serve as dart boards for hammer throwing contests and still survive as serviceable. I remember noticing how much thinner the 1973-79 dentside bed sheetmetal was when compared to even the bumpside body that immediately preceeded it. And my first pick up was two design cycles prior to the bump... a 1963 unibody. The steel on older trucks used to be so thick, that double wall wasn't necessary.

Anyway, days gone by, and now we have Aluminum. But Aluminum isn't the problem. It is the material thickness of the Aluminum that is the issue. If the aluminum were thicker, then it wouldn't tear as easily. I can still tear an aluminum can of Coke with my bare hands, even at my age. But I never could tear a steel can of soup, even at half my age.
 

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Since Alum won't rust, there is no concern of microscopic moisture being trapped between it and the Line-X. I still believe this is the best solution for the current model beds since you are not going to convince Ford to change back.

As to tearing, steel and aluminum just act differently. Steel will stretch, aluminum won't and that's why it tears.

Everything is trying to be more efficient and going thinner is a way to do that. Compare your coke circa 1970 to ones we have now. I'm betting there is a significant difference in thickness. Heck, go a few decades earlier and those Alum (1967 is when coke and pepsi went to alum cans) are likely as thick as these beds are...for a can of soda.
 

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Since Alum won't rust, there is no concern of microscopic moisture being trapped between it and the Line-X.

Jesus_man, I didn't say "rust". I said corrosion. Re read the post. It hasn't been edited.


Aluminum WILL corrode.



Corroded aluminum roof ventilation stack flashing




Corroded aluminum thick plate, with perforation.


Corroded aluminum on a sailboat.



Courtesy NASA.gov, probably "military grade" aluminum



Corroded aluminum floor from 8 year old trailer, complete disintegration.



Corroded aluminum tank.



Corroded aluminum bridge railing. Look at the grain lines in the boundary layers. Salt corrodes aluminum just like it corrodes steel. Aluminum is neither immune to corrosion, nor is it less likely to corrode.



Aluminum corrosion isn't as noticeable because it is generally innocent looking white, like an angel, instead of "rusty" looking red, like a devil.





Pitting propagation in aluminum panel



No matter how thick the aluminum is...


The marketing department of a vehicle manufacturer promoting their switch to aluminum bed and body manufacturing is probably all too happy that people generally believe that aluminum doesn't corrode. Especially "military grade" aluminum. Whereas, the academic, scientific, institutional, and indeed even the military... the entire community of educated material scientists and engineers, who aren't selling anything, would beg to differ.
 

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ok, so I did assume you said rust. While I don't believe Aluminum is the answer, it is what we have and I simply took the precautions I felt best to protect my investment.
 

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My concern would be galvanic corrosion. I would quickly prime/paint any surface that was scratched to expose bare aluminum. Its true that a strong layer of aluminum-oxide can form and make a strong barrier but a paint designed for aluminum is even better. I would use a marine grade non-metalic anti-seize for all of my work since the graphite found in regular anti-seize will steal electrodes. I would make sure there was an electrical barrier between the bed and all metal products I might be hauling. I would be very careful of the fastener material I used for tool boxes, topper hold-downs, gooseneck hitches, etc..
 

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This talk about saving weight on a heavy duty truck with more than enough power is ridiculous.

Your truck weighs 8000+ lbs and some are worried about adding 50lbs worth of line-x?

Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
 

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That's not quite the point.
I believe it's more if they can save weight on the truck, they can call out a higher towing/payload capacity.

Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
 

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Aluminum bed dent solution

I custom ordered a 2017 F350 from the factory about one year ago. I got the factory spray-in bed liner but that's not what I relied on to avoid dents and possibly puncture holes in the bed floor. I got real high tech! I have a 6 3/4 foot bed so I cut a piece of 5/8" plywood to the 6 3/4' bed length and leave it there permanently. I have a factory bed extender assembly so I even cut round holes for the bed extender feet so it sets properly and the locking mechanisms work. I even cut two other pieces of 5/8" ply to cover the tailgates and front bed aluminum walls so it doesn't get banged up when carry things that could slide into the front and rear walls. If you want to get really anal, you could cut out pieces of ply to cover the bed floor in front/behind the wheel wheels.
With this solution in place, go ahead drop that tool! No damage and when you go to sell the truck, the aluminum bed floor will be like new. Kind of like using Weather Tech foot well liners.
 
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