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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My front rotors are warped again and was considering aftermarket rotors and pads are these slotted and/or drilled rotors less prone to warpage. Also saw oem style rotors made by bear and ebc would they be any better.
 

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I have had a set of drilled & slotted rotors from Rotorpros.com on my truck for a little over 2 years with extensive towing (over 25K in tow miles alone) since I have installed these and have yet to have ANY problems whatsoever. I had installed a set of Raybestos' best rotors ($125 each) to replace the factory rotors and within a month or so they too were warped. I torqued to spec., burnished in the rotors, and so on I did everything that was to be done in order to get longevity out of these factory replacements to no avail, I was once again back to warped rotors so bad that I couldn't carry a drink in the cup holder. I read everything that I could and most say not to use drilled rotors they crack, I say BS @ 25k miles no cracks, no warps just smooth braking. I believe in these Rotorpros.com products so much I have installed them on my 2000 F250 4x4, '99 F250 4x4, '02 Toyota Sequoia 2wd, '03 F250 King Ranch 4x4 and soon '03 F550 Western Hauler 4x4, so I can preach from the use of their products on the quality and effectiveness. I will never again by factory replacement solid style rotors for any vehicle I ever own. I purchased a whole set front & rear drilled & slotted rotors with low dust pads delivered to my door for less that $350 (2000 F250 4x4). Sorry for such a long post but I hope this helps in any way. Todd
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the info but when I went on the rotorpros website it just gave me links of online dealers none of them sold rotor pro rotors are they marketed under another brand name
 

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pstroked1ton, I have trouble understanding how you can go through three sets of rotors. The truck in my sig. has 75K on it and there is at least 75% left on the pads. The rotors are as true as when they were originally installed. With the 6spd and gearing down, brakes are only used to complete a stop. With the exhaust brake in use, the brakes are seldom used. I tow regularly (GCW 20K) and have never had an issue. I live in hilly country, so stopping on hills is the norm. I am not trying to criticize your driving, but I can't see eating up brakes with a manual gear box.
jgr
 

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I have 260+ on my original Rotors. I have torqued them down as tight as I coulde every time I take the lugs off.
I have pulled well over 13k on a 40' trailor and they are still great. Sadly those days are over. I think if the
stock lugs are tight they wont warp. But I have not heared any bad reports from Hawk pads and rotors. I have only
heard of race cars cracking rotors from extrime heat swings. Cant say it wont happen on a truck. Sounds like you
have a good product you are looking at.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
well the set im getting ready to replace is the second set, although on the first set I had caliper issues (slide pin). I am really easy on brakes mostly interstate driving very early in the morning rarly even need the brakes and sense I have a 6 speed I downshift always I cant even remember the last time I had to panic stop. So I cant imagine it would be my driving style.
 

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well the set im getting ready to replace is the second set, although on the first set I had caliper issues (slide pin). I am really easy on brakes mostly interstate driving very early in the morning rarly even need the brakes and sense I have a 6 speed I downshift always I cant even remember the last time I had to panic stop. So I cant imagine it would be my driving style.
It most absolutely is. That type of driving is the textbook case for developing rotor disc variation, and what really everyone develops. The problem is that during driving down the road there is a high percentage of cases where a brake pad touches the highest runout point of the rotor. All rotors have lateral runout, and the factory limit was 0.0010", which can still be problematic.

So as your highway driving and not touching the brakes, this high point is slowly worn from the contact to the pads. Keep in mind that the highest runout on the outer rotor side is generally 180° opposite from the high runout on the inner side. Once the thickness variation of the rotor gets to be about 0.0005" - 0.0008", your going to feel pulsation due to the wedging between the pads of the rotors thickness change. It's the same as increasing and decreasing the hydraulic brake pressure.

People that do a higher proportion of braking have less issues because when they are braking they are wearing (grinding) the rotors true.

For that type of driving style you need two things. Lowest installed rotor runout and more deceleration rotor wear to keep the rotors worn true. And the second is accomplished by using brake pads that are more rotor abrasive. The OE brake pad has low rotor abrasion and was selected for this application with commercial use in mind. So part of the solution is to go with pads like those offered by Performance Friction, Hawk, or many of the other aftermarket manufacturers.

The rotors get blamed for the problem when in fact they are the victim. Unless they are poorly installed or machined poorly with a high runout. Everyone changes both pads and rotors, then declares it was the rotor that solved the issue. Wrong hero. You've made two changes.

If you already have pulsation from the rotors, then you've got a high probability of already having hard spots in the rotors. It's not worth turning them as the machining will not remove the crystallization, and the problem just returns in 5k-15k miles. Then it's blamed that the rotors were turned too thin and warped from heat. Nothing more could be further from the truth. Rotors are designed from the point of minimum thickness, then more meat is added for wear and resurfacing.
 

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FMTRVT, I am having trouble swallowing your theory. If that is true, please explain to me why, after 75K of mixed driving my brakes are as good as new. There is no pulsing, pulling, or chatter. I have done a few panic stops when someone tried to modify my rig. I torque the lug nuts and maintain the pad slide pins. I hardly use my service brakes, but use the 6spd and exhaust brake all the time. I check the brake temps with a thermometer when on long trips. They are all the same. I don't feel I am just lucky since I have never had a brake problem on the last four stick shift trucks I haver owned. If round out was the problem, I would think that you could hear the rubbing if you jacked it up and spun the wheel.
jgr
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It most absolutely is. That type of driving is the textbook case for developing rotor disc variation, and what really everyone develops. The problem is that during driving down the road there is a high percentage of cases where a brake pad touches the highest runout point of the rotor. All rotors have lateral runout, and the factory limit was 0.0010", which can still be problematic.

So as your highway driving and not touching the brakes, this high point is slowly worn from the contact to the pads. Keep in mind that the highest runout on the outer rotor side is generally 180° opposite from the high runout on the inner side. Once the thickness variation of the rotor gets to be about 0.0005" - 0.0008", your going to feel pulsation due to the wedging between the pads of the rotors thickness change. It's the same as increasing and decreasing the hydraulic brake pressure.

People that do a higher proportion of braking have less issues because when they are braking they are wearing (grinding) the rotors true.

For that type of driving style you need two things. Lowest installed rotor runout and more deceleration rotor wear to keep the rotors worn true. And the second is accomplished by using brake pads that are more rotor abrasive. The OE brake pad has low rotor abrasion and was selected for this application with commercial use in mind. So part of the solution is to go with pads like those offered by Performance Friction, Hawk, or many of the other aftermarket manufacturers.

The rotors get blamed for the problem when in fact they are the victim. Unless they are poorly installed or machined poorly with a high runout. Everyone changes both pads and rotors, then declares it was the rotor that solved the issue. Wrong hero. You've made two changes.

If you already have pulsation from the rotors, then you've got a high probability of already having hard spots in the rotors. It's not worth turning them as the machining will not remove the crystallization, and the problem just returns in 5k-15k miles. Then it's blamed that the rotors were turned too thin and warped from heat. Nothing more could be further from the truth. Rotors are designed from the point of minimum thickness, then more meat is added for wear and resurfacing.

Well that would deffinetly make sense. After I replaced my rotors last, I adjusted my driving style even more to minimize braking even to the point where I would almost entirely use down shifting,lane changing and timming of the few lights I do hit. I thought I was saving my brakes.
So hawk pads but oem rotors will be fine?
 

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Yep. Hawk or Performance Friction are good choices. But with any companies rotor, it's always important (if you can) to check the runout of the rotor as it's installed. I believe you're 2WD front rotor is a with the hub, so the only check would be that is wasn't bent in shipment or manufactured incorrectly.

If the rotors have not developed the hard spot in them as yet, going to the aggressive pad and using you brakes more may solve the problem by wearing the rotors true. If the pulsing worsens, then you know you need rotors. But in these economic times, taking baby $$$$ steps can have it's benefits.

And since your in Northern VA, you could stop over to the OE pad manufacturers' divisional headquarters in Winchester and complain. :toomuchinfo:
 

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i have roto pros on my 250 and toyota tacoma,, bought them off of ebay, have the seller in my favorites,

after not changing my driving habits but changing my rotors i now no longer have worped rotors,,

lots and lots of hauling,

just my 2 cents
 

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Well, my rotors just started to pulse and are warped at 30K The truck never pulls anything---its used as a stop and go around town vehicle and Im on the brakes constantly. Thios started 4,000 miles after some dork at a Les Schwab rotated my tires then took an air gun with plain socket and no regulator, then slammed the nuts on without even doing a pattern. Could that have been the problem? Im going to powerslot cryos now but wonder if thats a waste of money after reading this and the one link.
 

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I am trying to find out if someone tried the remedy of drilled rotors to cure rotor warpage. I find anecdotal responses of guys who have a million miles with no warpage and therefore consider it a myth (I am going on my fourth set of rotors with only 210k miles, and each time the replacement cures the vibration, albeit temporarily). I see guys that think higher friction pads will keep it from occurring (I use performance friction carbon/metallics - some of the highest friction pads to be found) I see guys with engine braking saying it's not an issue (duh).
As s now retired mechanic of 40 years (ASE master mechanic, fully high tech capable, blah, blah, blah) I know from experience that Fords tend to be under braked from the factory. So the wimpy 13 inch rotors on my 2000 F250 SuperDuty crew cab 4x4 7.3 PowerStroke are greatly insufficient when towing at max capacity and speed. The rotors are fine as long as proper smooth braking is applied, so as not to overheat the rotors, but when towing at speed or down hill and that one mindless twit decides to move in front of you at a much slower speed and you perform that emergency braking procedure, required to keep from crushing the mindless twit, it always seems to result in overheated and warped rotors.
So, does anyone that has been experiencing warped front brake rotors and has switched to drilled rotors have an answer as to the effectiveness of this switch?
 

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My front rotors are warped again and was considering aftermarket rotors and pads are these slotted and/or drilled rotors less prone to warpage. Also saw oem style rotors made by bear and ebc would they be any better.
Brakes convert momentum energy into heat energy. The shorter the stopping distance the more heat is concentrated in the rotors. Longer braking periods dissipate heat as you're slowing down. We all know this. What hasn't been mentioned is after coming to a stop allow a few feet in front of the vehicle and let the vehicle creep forward a bit instead of sitting in one place. The idea is as you sit stopped the rotors are cooling except where pads are clamped to the rotor, causing uneven cooling which is what I believe causes most rotor warping.
 

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Through the years, I have tried expensive slotted rotors with various pads. However, even they warped after a while.

Overall, on my truck which we use for towing, I have found the best rotors to be Motorcraft rotors along with Motorcraft heavy duty pads. I always torque the wheels with a torque wrench when rotating my tires. This seems to work well for me to keep the rotors from warping.
 
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