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Discussion Starter #1
I'm sure I will get some grief for this, but....

Just like everyone else, I tend to overload my truck. I'll move 6 ton of hay on a 4,500# gooseneck, or load up 3,000# (wet weight) of slide-in camper and pull ~ 8,000# of horses/trailer behind.

From what I understand, Ford states the axle capacity based upon the capacity of the tires - I may be wrong in stating this however.

I have read many folks putting on 19.5" rickson wheels to overcome the tire limitations, but what about the "true" axle capacity? What is it, or where can that be found? I have thought about upgrading tires to the 19.5" (regardless what others may say, I'm not worried about the "legal" or nameplate GVW) - but I am concerned that with getting tires that will add another ~3,000# of capacity, would the axles hold up?

Would appreciate any comments - have a '03 F350, CC, SRW.
 

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The gawr for the rear and the front should be on the sticker on the drivers door jam area with the vin # and axle code.open the door and look to the right.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Here's the problem with looking at the GAWR....

"GAWR: Gross Axle Weight Rating: The MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE WEIGHT each axle assembly is designed to carry, as measured at the tires, therefore including the weight of the axle assembly itself. GAWR is established by considering the rating of each of its components (tires, wheels, springs, axle), and rating the axle on its weakest link. The GAWR assumes that the LOAD IS EQUAL ON EACH SIDE"

I don't want to know what the rating is based upon the weakest link - rather I want to know what the axle itself is rated......
 

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[ QUOTE ]
I don't want to know what the rating is based upon the weakest link - rather I want to know what the axle itself is rated......

2003 7.3l, F350, CC Long Bed 4wd, ...

[/ QUOTE ]

You have an F-350 SRW, so your Ford/Visteon 10.5" rear axle (often called a Sterling axle) is rated at 6,830 pounds @ground.

Your pairs of tires, wheels, and rear spring packs are also all rated at 6,830 pounds @ground, so since your "weakest link" is 6,830 pounds @ground, your rear GAWR is probably also 6,830 pounds. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It just seems strange that the axle just happens to be exactly rated at what the tire capacity is...

I still have to think that Ford is simply stating the "weakest link" rating, that of the tires. Again I may be wrong, but in the engineering world, this would be considered a safety factor by derating components.

If the axle is truly a 6,830# rating, I would have to think there have been numerous examples of failures since most of us towing or camping with these trucks are routinely overweight.

I know there are several examples of tire failures with overloading, but I haven't heard of axle failures except when hitting a deep ditch at high speeds overloaded..........
 

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That's the rating for what the axle can support. It can tow more than that.

Personally I decided the tow ratings are completely arbitrary. Since the MFG's seem to change them as soon as the other one raises There's.
 

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That's the rating for what the axle can support. It can tow more than that.

Personally I decided the tow ratings are completely arbitrary. Since the MFG's seem to change them as soon as the other one raises Theirs
 

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The rear 10.50 Visteon full floater is rated at 9750 lbs, that is right from their website. With full tank of fuel, myself and my bride, my F350 has a rear GAW of 3100 lbs. So technically, from the said rating of 9750 lbs I can put 6650 lbs of stuff in my bed right? I don't think so, you need to go by the tires, in my case it's 7280 lbs on the rear axle, or a 4180 lb payload MAX not one pound over. Some of those 19.5 commercial tires are rated at 5000 lbs each, I sure hope some knucklehead isn't putting up a 10K rear gross axle weight.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
The rear 10.50 Visteon full floater is rated at 9750 lbs, that is right from their website.

[/ QUOTE ]

Yes, Visteon says they will build you a 10.5" rear axle today that can handle up to 9,750 pounds. But Visteon has built several different versions of the 10.5" rear axle over the years. Ford says the version they bought from Visteon for 2003 SRW pickups will handle 6,830 pounds. The version they bought from Visteon for the 2006 F-350 SRW will handle 7,280 pounds. And finally, the version they bought from Visteon for the 2006 F-350 chassis cab DRW with 5.4L gasser engine is the one on that website = 9,750 pounds @ground.
 

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First let me say that I in no way condone overloading components past their rated capacities.

Second let me say that my wrecker weighs 9,500# unloaded, and has a GVWR of 10,000#. And I do not make my living towing 800# cars.

There is going to be considerable difference between the rating limit and the actual load limit of an axle. The actual load limit is going to be the point where the spindle (usually) actually breaks.

At loads under the breaking point, you may experience unacceptably rapid wear of the bearings and gears.


Now to the original question. Particularly on a single wheel truck, I would want to have the best tires possible. However I'd be very cautious about upping your loads, because the next weak link is your axle spindle. And when that breaks you're in a world of hurt.
 

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[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
The rear 10.50 Visteon full floater is rated at 9750 lbs, that is right from their website.

[/ QUOTE ]

Yes, Visteon says they will build you a 10.5" rear axle today that can handle up to 9,750 pounds. But Visteon has built several different versions of the 10.5" rear axle over the years. Ford says the version they bought from Visteon for 2003 SRW pickups will handle 6,830 pounds. The version they bought from Visteon for the 2006 F-350 SRW will handle 7,280 pounds. And finally, the version they bought from Visteon for the 2006 F-350 chassis cab DRW with 5.4L gasser engine is the one on that website = 9,750 pounds @ground.

[/ QUOTE ]
So besides the brakes, wheels and tires what are the differences between the ratings on the axle? Is the housing the same? Are the bearings the same? Hubs? Size of the floating axle or spline count? I can see where brakes could become a problem when overweight but isn't the rest of it the same? So wheels and tires would be the controling element?
 

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Years ago I helped My Best Buddy's Dad harvest potatos one summer.... Couple Guys came out one afternoon and loaded 10,000# of potatos in an older F-350 dually stake truck. When I left work that night I saw those Boys parked along side the road 10 miles from the farm at a weird angle....they had broken the end off the left rear axle housing and the wheels, brake drum, hub, and outboard stub of the axle shaft were rolled over by the side of the truck. Full floating axles stand a lot more abuse and over-loading than a semi-floating axle but they can break!
 

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From what you describe in your post, you're only putting 3k lbs in the bed at best. You should be able to go up to around 4k lbs with oem tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
While I haven't weighed in with the camper loaded and the horse trailer attached yet to comfirm the loading; but at this time I am loading a 2,000# dry camper, assuming ~ 1,000# wet and loaded for a trip along with a ~8,000# horse trailer. So I know I am not over the axle tire limits at this point.

The problem exists as I am looking at replacing this old 2,000# camper with a new 9.5' Artic Fox that weighs 3,500# dry! This extra 1,500# would take me over the tire rating. I know I can upgrade the tires, but it is tough to upgrade the axle.

At the same time, I now several (and I would assume many on this forum) that will typically overload their trucks (tire/axle) by at least this 1,500# I am concerned about, without even considering the components. Being an engineer, I do know that there are safety factors built into everything, but I don't want to push to failure.

Guess I'm trying to find out what I can do short of getting a newer, higher load limit truck, or swapping out the rearend for a dually!
 

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I know your concern, Yhe wife an I have a 1997 F-350 SRW 4x4 we pull a 40foot 4 horse with 14 foot Living quarter horse trailer. 1000 pounds over what the door sticker says we should I think it's 6048 an we are at something like 7100 pounds on rear axle loaded with fuel,water,horses,kids,food. I am thinking of going with the rickson wheels also. don't really want to put adapters on cause I think that inch or so extra could put undo stress on the axle.I hate to think what the original tires do when you go around or hit a pothole. let me know if you get the rickson wheels.
 

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The tire is going to fail before the axle I think anyway. The trucking world has a rule in many states that is a percentage of the tire rating remembering tread depth can lesson the load percentage of safe travel under a load. A dana 60 or a dana 80 ford f350 2005 with the Visteon ambulance upgrade that hasn't been used, if I have a 13000 gvwr and a trailer that has a tongue rating of 6000 lbs or even a 3"ball increasing the tongue rating to 8000.....how do you determine the tongue weight if you have say a 38500 gvwr trailer triple axle the load rating of the truck is 13000.....the actual weight on the truck with triple axle or dual axle trailer will be nowhere near that mpty….so is it the difference between the truck and trailer or just simply do not exceed 13000 if that's your trucks gvrw?
 
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