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Hold your fire boys. Cease fire.

My question is which method, crimp or solder, would have benefitted the OP more?

It sounds like even if the crimp was performed correctly when new that the corrosion resulted in the cable strands disintegrating and this resulted in the crimp no longer having a tight grip.

Would the same have occured with a solder? Would a wire strand encapsulated in solder be safe from corrosion?

OK...you can start shooting again.
The problem isn't that one method is superior to the other, but rather the need to continue a "I'm right, your wrong" discussion. I have crimped NUMEROUS battery cables over the years and have had the battery fail long before the connection corroded. This includes autos and RV's. Unless someone can post FACTS from an INDEPENDANT source, I say they are both good to go....Lets leave it there.
 

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Searching the interwebs, it seems soldering is not recommended for battery cables.
Most times, the strands break at the edge of the solder. (Now this could be a case of operator error)
So I would say, if you don't have the right setup to solder them, then just crimp it.

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I didn't realize we were shooting. I was just trying to thoroughly answer what he axed me.

Corrosion can only affect a surface exposed to something corrosive. Solder adheres to Copper, effectively becoming a new surface. Crimping merely mashes the surfaces together, but all those surfaces are still exposed to air, water, battery acid, and everything else in the atmosphere around them. Water & acid will wick into a crimp; they can't wick into solder.

Yes, solder reduces the flexible length of cable. But if the cable is pre-bent before soldering to the shape it needs to be (as that photo album shows), that doesn't add any stress to the soldered cable, and it doesn't break.

The only setup needed is a common propane torch.
 

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I built/repaired several battery cables with new ends. I use solder on the and use HD heat shrink, I do not have a crimper so solder is easy choice for me. One set of cables have 15 years on them with no problems. Just one more thing to stir the pot is how corrosive is the flux and what effect will it have on the copper wire not covered with solder?
DENNY
 

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That would depend on the flux. If you're talking about rosin-core electrical solder, it's NOT corrosive to Copper - that's why it's used. But if you're talking about MISusing acid-core plumbing or structural solder on Copper wire - sure, it's corrosive.
 

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I finally picked up some various sized copper ring terminal lugs to fix my crappy corroded stock 6.0 positive cable ends. I need to ensure that i've got the proper fitment between the cable and the lug and i need to determine the proper die size to crump the lugs with my new hydraulic crimper.

Here is my problem, I've taken some 6 AWG Lugs and prepared some 6 AWG Cable for the new lug. (I realize that this is too small for battery cable but wanted to practice on cable that I've got lying around the garage.) The issue is that it seems like the 6 AWG lug is too big for the 6 AWG cable after the insulation has been stripped from the wire. I'm sure I could crimp it if I used a much smaller die but it just doesn't seem right. I would assume that the bare wire shoud be snug in the lug before the lug gets crimped. To accomplish this I'd actually have to use an 8 AWG lug for the 6 AWG wire.

Again, I'm only using the smaller wire for practice but assume that the same might be true for bigger wire (i.e. go smaller on the lug to ensure snug fit before crimping)

Can anyone with experience please shed some light on this?

Thanks.
 

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My experience has been that the terminal sizing is variable. Maybe if I wasn't so cheap (ie. bought better terminals) they would be more consistent. I just use whichever die is close. This isn't brain surgery and even my worst crimps are significantly better than a lot of what I see in production situations.
 

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My experience has been that the terminal sizing is variable. Maybe if I wasn't so cheap (ie. bought better terminals) they would be more consistent. I just use whichever die is close. This isn't brain surgery and even my worst crimps are significantly better than a lot of what I see in production situations.
Understood. I'm frugal as well and copper terminal lugs are expensive which is why I want to make sure I've got my plan in place before I go crimping and then having to discard bad-crimped lugs.

I actually tried one yesterday (6 AWG Cable with 6 AWG lug) using recommended 16mm die and it did a good job. It seemed like the lug was too big but it worked ok. I may try an 8 AWG lug to see if it fits better, pre-crimp.

I know this is a relatively boring subject but good connections are important.
 

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If you're doing practice crimps anyway then cut one open to see how well you're doing. I've never cut into one but I've been told that a properly crimped join will fuse the metal together.
 

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Crimping does not fuse metal. (Soldering, brazing, & welding do.) But crimps CAN be cut open for inspection & diagnosis.
 

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That would take a lot of force. Lol

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I saw a really-interesting show a few years ago about explosive-welding sheets of dissimilar metals together to make hybrid metal laminates.
 

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I saw that. I think it was on how it's made.

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The one I saw was probably an hour-long piece, showing the prep, the abandoned mine where they blast, and the stuff they make from the laminates, like bomb shelters for the rich & governmental. It couldn't have been a 10-min segment in How It's Made. Maybe Modern Marvels, or Engineering the Impossible. I can't find it on IMDb, though.
 

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Try season 13 episode 12 of modern marvels.

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