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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I took the bed off my truck yesterday today i am grinding off bed rails and using wire wheel to get rust off frame. My bed is kind of bowed in the middle of bed looks like something heavy was put there is there anything I can do to make straight again. Next step will be welding new bed rails on. Also while I was taking bed off I had to use torch to heat up bed bolts and when I did this I melted some wires next to fuel tank that were strapped to frame its a big bundle of wires where would I get new wires or could a use wire connects and heat shrink or electrical tape to fix it or will that eventually come back to bite because once bed is on again will not be able to get to very easily. Also planning on doing the hutch and harpoon mod without spending to much im only 18 so dont have a ton of money and experience so all the help is very much appreciated. Also with the hutch mod where is best place to get a out of the tank fuel filter or is best to just let fuel bowl filter get anything that needs filtered. Plan on keeping my truck for a very long time as it has been a great truck so far and a very cheap dependable good looking truck. Only thing to complain about is that I dont like the ride very stiff. Not sure if anybody has done anything to make truck ride better. If anybody has any other ideas or thoughts of what I should do while bed is off would be much appreciated. Also if there is a better way to get rust off and what is best undercoating paint to use. Live on a farm so I do know how to use a wrench and have a nice assortment of tools power and air so can do alot more things with these tools once again thanks for any comments.
 

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Having the box off makes replacing things like spring shackles and hangers a hell of a lot easier. Those are very common items for rusting out and should be looked at for sure. Also have a good look at the steel brake line that runs along the frame...that is another common thing that usually rots, especially where you can't see it, behind the front fuel tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am going to replace brake line by fuel tank and I am also replacing emergency brake line as it is rusty also and figured that's something that should be changed was wondering if there is anything else that should be done
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Why would I want to put anti seize on bed bolts I would think you would want to put some locktite stuff on them wouldn't think I would ever want to pull bed back off.
 

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Oh they will never come loose and Loktite is over $30 a bottle these days, save it.
I say that because I don't know if you drive where salt is put on the roads or it lives by the ocean. If you don't use anti seize it's a pain nightmare cutting the bolt heads off and then a hundred something dollars for new bed bolts and clips.
You might get into an accident and the bed needs to come off. you might get a tank of gasoline by accident. That pick up foot will break off at some point.
All of these are reasons I suggested that.
You don't need to be in salty areas for them to seize either because they are self tapping into the speed clip nuts, the cutting, cuts the galvinization off the threads so the get a mist bath every time you go down a wet street. This gets in the threads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes they put salt on where I live and yes I guess you bring up some good points my bed bolts had never been off before till now and I broke 3 or 4 bits trying to get them all off even after heating them up with torch and spraying penetrating fluid on them only had to grind one off that was between frame and diesel tank. Should I put anti seize on anything else.
 

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Once the bolts are in, slather the nuts and shafts of ones you can get to as well as before threading in. Coat any and all exposed fasteners..
I have other notes on your other thread.
Dielectric grease every connector you can find.

I strongly recommend going to EBay and finding a Snap On Torx Removal bit set. There is no other comparison to not rounding, wearing, breaking. Kit also contains one or two not so common but is used on our truck sizes.
Once used, you will thank me, trust me on this one if nothing else.
 

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Also if you live in the rust belt buy a 25 undercoat sprayer and use it to spray used oil on the underside of the truck inside the door. cab corners, rockers, cab mounts, under the floor, remove tail lights and spay over your rear wheel well and any place you can get inside the front fenders especially behind the front wheel , about 2x a year. Go look at an old truck where engine etc leaked oil on the frame or body, it won't be rusty there
 

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IMO, there are better surface protectants than used motor oil. It was a common practice on farms and on military bases many years ago, typically with a wax mixed in to help it adhere but the options available today with newer technologies are something to look at.

Here is the POR-15:
POR-15 Rust Preventive Coating

Here is a petroleum type wax spray which can be used in hard to reach areas:
Waxy Film Protectant - Aerosol | Sprayon
 

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I'm not that keen on POR-15 anymore. It has not provided the rust protection on some application despite following the directions explicitly. Looking at Eastwood.

We pulled bed bolts all the time to install weight frames in the test trucks. Those thread cutting bolts really like to seize in place and just like the body shops, we used to cut out many of them, not only with used vehicles, but if the vehicle sat in the lot for months. The one use only designation is due to their thread cutting nature as it can't be guaranteed that during a second install they won't recut threads and reduce the holding capability of the U-Clip nut.

But keeping them lubed to minimize rust is worth the trouble to buy insurance that you might be able to get them out when you need to.
 

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I haven't tried it yet but this spring I may use their encapsulation product, not the converter. The POR-15 should be painted for UV exposure too. I have where that is necessary.

If you do a search for opinions it will be like a battery or oil thread, all different experiences.

I'll be most likely doing a bed flip this spring as my rails have had it and I'm two years passed my normal vehicle flip timetable.
 

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I would very highly recommend the Eastwood product. I did my entire truck March of 2015 and really liked how it applied and looks.
I took a wire brush on my grinder and went over every inch of the under belly that I could possibly reach and also removed the bed and then covered it with both spray cans, brush, and roller. It wasnt an inexpensive job but well worth doing since I want to keep this thing for another 15 years.
 

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I would very highly recommend the Eastwood product. I did my entire truck March of 2015 and really liked how it applied and looks.
I took a wire brush on my grinder and went over every inch of the under belly that I could possibly reach and also removed the bed and then covered it with both spray cans, brush, and roller. It wasnt an inexpensive job but well worth doing since I want to keep this thing for another 15 years.
I have been thinking of doing exactly that with mine. State of CO does not use salt but I moved to Boulder County and they use magnesium chloride and the surface rust has started immediately on exposed metal that has not had an issue in 15 years.
 
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Mag chloride is really a problem. Normal road salt is corrosive, but nothing like the new 'mo Bettr chemicals (rather less expensive, thought to be environmentally better) that the state governments have been using. Plus they don't wash off as easily and are hygroscopic. The trucking industry have been dealing with this for more then the last two decades as the use has become more widespread.

IMO, people who have cross contamination of the different deicers really have worse issues, as the synergistic effect just eats all types of metals, and induces more galvanic activity between aluminum and steel.

Due a Google search about corrosion in the trucking industry and you'll have a long read. Look at this site and others for the severe erosion of brake rotors. There was an accident situation years back about a pickup that had a brake pull accident where a rotor came apart due to corrosion. And then we have the common political commentary about the poor shape of our bridges, which in a large part has to do with the increase in corrosive damage. If the state governments want to address bridge deterioration they should first address the products they are putting on the roads, and do us with vehicles a service at the same time.

http://www.ttnews.com/articles/showtemplatetmc2015.aspx?storyid=37412

http://www.trucking.org/ATA Docs/Ab...al Induced Corrosion - TMC Position Paper.pdf

Off soapbox.
 

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I know we're getting off topic a bit, but I sometimes wonder if governments really care about our concerns. I look at road corrosion for instance, if your truck rusts out "prematurely" due to road de-icers, you go buy another truck...and the government gets their chunk of taxes from you...more often!

...Remember when people drove their vehicles for 20 years, or more? That used to be a regular occurrence...not so much anymore.
 

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I was watching " Modern a Marvels " and they were doing snow and salt control. They were in some state plow trucks, I believe up in Alaska. They use military grade gps to plow with no visibility. Commercial is off by so much but military is dead on. This guy is rolling at about 50. He is just staring at screen on dash showing the truck, the guard rails/ditches and center line.
They were also at the GM corrosion testing facility up in Minnesota, I think. They take the car around track in slushy salty stuff, they put it into a oven looking thing that has sal****er mists blasting up from floor, walls and ceiling. They close the door and control heat and humididity. They can simulate 10 yrs. of corossion in a few months at this place. They take the car out and they take it completly apart. Tables have tables set up in this massive open air facility. Every table has a big number on it. Each table has every single part that makes the vehicle up tagged and laid out on the table. They then open the doors and a wave of clipboard carrying( don't ask why not tablets) engineers comes into the facility. They locate their table, go to it, pick up the part they engineered and make notes on how it held up to the 10yr. simulation. GM guy says they turn in notes and it's all weighed out if they want to spend more on keeping said part from corroding. He made statement, you couldn't afford the car if the made it more anticorrosive.
So we do it this way. Some engineers had huge smiles and others are holding little brackets or something with their jaws on the floor and are just staring at some remain that looks like scrap pulled off the ocean floor.
So the moved onto road treatment and said that the alternatives to salt not only can melt ice at single digits or below as salt won't but it's less corrosive to vehicles and equipment but is more expensive, upto 3 times as much and is cost prohibitive for some municipality This is what they said anyway.
This new generation of Fseries of aluminum bodies will be a disaster with the aluminum touching steel. The electrolysis alone with no salt, just from water, will turn the aluminum to white powder.
 

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I've been to those vehicle test facilities, but they suffer the same issue as we did with brake testing. In the brake industry we do accelerated wear tests, with the test running over a period of two to four weeks under a set of set parameters. There are two problems. One is that now matter how we design the test, it cannot encompass all of the exposure that the parts all see across then entire country. So warrantee issues pop up in certain regions. We alter the next round of product tests, there always be something in the public arena that wasn't accounted for.

The second problem, and the one that the most impact, is time. Aging is a factor that no matter how we design the test we can't accelerate. You can salt spray all day, you can humidify all day, you can heat bake all day, but you can't age more then a day in a day. And that changes a lot with certain things. An engineer can state they can plan or design for anything, then they build the Titanic, or Hindenburg, or Pinto, or Vega. It's always something that wasn't thought about or just didn't know at the time.
 
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