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Discussion Starter #1
What is the best way to clean the inter-cooler out and dry it again?

Thanks,

Griz
 

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Best way would probably be pull it and take it the radiator repair shop for a hot dip. Otherwise, running simple green through it, flush it out and put it out in the Texas sun for a few hours to dry it out...
 

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Best way would probably be pull it and take it the radiator repair shop for a hot dip. Otherwise, running simple green through it, flush it out and put it out in the Texas sun for a few hours to dry it out...
I don't have any Hot Texas sun here in Washington...just rain does that work? :lol:

Griz
 

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I don't have any Hot Texas sun here in Washington...just rain does that work? :lol:

Griz
Be careful, you don't want moss growing in it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Be careful, you don't want moss growing in it.
Now you tell me. :sick: After looking at the instructions on how to pull the intercooler I think it is just fine. :yesnod: Maybe I need to design a portable flushing system that hooks up to the intercooler and circulates hot water with a detergent through it until clean and then blows hot Texas air to dry it. :thumbsup: Or maybe when the wife isn't looking I'll hook up the washing machine to it and run a couple of cycles through it. :jester:

Griz
 

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Its actually not that bad pulling it out.... The hardest part is probably moving the AC Condenser without breaking any lines.

If I were going to pull mine again, I would most certainly bring it to a repair shop, that way they can test for leaks as well.

When I pulled mine out to swap the engine, I cleaned it out with plain old gasoline, followed by alot of water.

Just my $0.02!

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Its actually not that bad pulling it out.... The hardest part is probably moving the AC Condenser without breaking any lines.

If I were going to pull mine again, I would most certainly bring it to a repair shop, that way they can test for leaks as well.

When I pulled mine out to swap the engine, I cleaned it out with plain old gasoline, followed by alot of water.

Just my $0.02!

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Do you feel it is really worth it? Could you notice any improvement in EGT cooling etc.?

Griz
 

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It took me only an hour to pull mine. Soaked it in Super Clean (purple stuff) for a little while then turned it up so it can drain and air dry for a day. I don't remember having to work around the A/C condenser. If you do it, only tip I have is the 10mm bolts will use 11mm socket...guess because the layer of paint on it won't allow the 10mm socket to go over the head.
 

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Do you feel it is really worth it? Could you notice any improvement in EGT cooling etc.?

Griz
To be honest, I changed so many things with my old truck, there would have been NO way to figure out if that helped it any.... Or if the gasoline had eaten any seals and made it worse.

Sorry I cant give any more information about that.... I only kept the truck for about 3 weeks after I did that before trading it in.
 

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To be honest, I changed so many things with my old truck, there would have been NO way to figure out if that helped it any.... Or if the gasoline had eaten any seals and made it worse.

Sorry I cant give any more information about that.... I only kept the truck for about 3 weeks after I did that before trading it in.
I'll probably hold off doing it at least for now. Spring time in Washington isn't conducive to air drying anything :icon_rolleyes: I might do it later during the warmer months or should I say weeks. :sick:

Griz
 

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I don't have any Hot Texas sun here in Washington...just rain does that work? :lol:

Griz
Gracious! I bet RT and I will make a deal with you. We will trade some Texas heat for your rain, as we have PLENTY of heat nowadays in Texas!

Mike
 

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Amen. Into the triple digits in June. August and September are going to be fun...
 

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Yep. I expect our air conditioners will be put to the test. Perhaps not like it was a year or two ago, but close.

We were through Wichita Falls late last summer towing our travel trailer and it was 109 degrees. Not sure what the road temps were, but our truck never complained.

The A/C did the best it could but at those road temps I do not think anything cools well.
 

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Gracious! I bet RT and I will make a deal with you. We will trade some Texas heat for your rain, as we have PLENTY of heat nowadays in Texas!

Mike
Sounds like a good swap. :lol:
 

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Here's what I have found.

For many years and many miles of driving, the intercooler gets full of oil from the PCV system. The vapors of the engine are routed back up and into the turbo inlet. These vapors condense in the intercooler and end up as oil in the bottom cores of the intercooler. With enough heavy throttle, the rushing air takes most of the oil out of the intercooler and up into the engine. What's left sits in the bottom of the intercooler and blocks the bottom cores of the intercooler. This makes the intercooler smaller and less efficient.

I have gone so far as to add a drain to the intercooler that allows the oil accumulation to exit the intercooler. This extra oil can be drained or routed back up and into the crank case. The point is to get the oil out of the intercooler and make room for charge air.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Here's what I have found.

For many years and many miles of driving, the intercooler gets full of oil from the PCV system. The vapors of the engine are routed back up and into the turbo inlet. These vapors condense in the intercooler and end up as oil in the bottom cores of the intercooler. With enough heavy throttle, the rushing air takes most of the oil out of the intercooler and up into the engine. What's left sits in the bottom of the intercooler and blocks the bottom cores of the intercooler. This makes the intercooler smaller and less efficient.

I have gone so far as to add a drain to the intercooler that allows the oil accumulation to exit the intercooler. This extra oil can be drained or routed back up and into the crank case. The point is to get the oil out of the intercooler and make room for charge air.
Interesting...I have no doubt there is oil inside the intercooler from the CCV system. I have added a decent CCV filter system that seems to be keeping the oil from getting into the intercooler now but how much is there...I don't have a clue. Like I said earlier when the weather warms up I'll take it out and clean the intercooler up. Doug, is there a method you would recommend to cleaning it up other than putting something like Purple Power in it and then rinsing with Hot Water and letting it dry afterwards?

Griz
 

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On my own truck, I took a 1/16th" drill bit in a drill bit extension and drilled a 1/16th" hole in the passengers' side tank. It took about 5min for the oil to find it's way out.

I left the hole open as there is NEVER a negative pressure there, only positive pressure and the boost pressure leak is inconsequential (1/16th" hole is tiny). The hole weeps and gives me a little oily stain on the radiator core support. I don't recommend this for everyone, but it is effective and easy. Whole job took about Min.

When I do it for a customer, I'll take an 1/8"NPT compression fitting and a length of 1/8th" capillary tube. The fitting goes into the bottom of the intercooler and the capillary tube comes up to the oil filler cap. As oil accumulates in the intercooler it is forced thru the capillary tube and back into the crank case.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
On my own truck, I took a 1/16th" drill bit in a drill bit extension and drilled a 1/16th" hole in the passengers' side tank. It took about 5min for the oil to find it's way out.

I left the hole open as there is NEVER a negative pressure there, only positive pressure and the boost pressure leak is inconsequential (1/16th" hole is tiny). The hole weeps and gives me a little oily stain on the radiator core support. I don't recommend this for everyone, but it is effective and easy. Whole job took about Min.

When I do it for a customer, I'll take an 1/8"NPT compression fitting and a length of 1/8th" capillary tube. The fitting goes into the bottom of the intercooler and the capillary tube comes up to the oil filler cap. As oil accumulates in the intercooler it is forced thru the capillary tube and back into the crank case.
I take it you have never removed the intercooler and cleaned it? With the CCV filter system I have on now I am not concerned about getting more oil inside the intercooler just removing what is in there now.

Griz
 

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So how much oil are you guys really even getting out. I thought about this when I had mine out but I dont think its worth it. When you drive any oil in the intercooler should be flushed out.

I imagine if it was a concern, they would be designed with drains.

I think it only takes a few minutes to pull an intercooler. Remove boots, 4 bolts, rubber cover on top and the hood latch iirc. I know the process can be done in less than an hour.
 

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When I did mine, there was a solid stream of oil for 5min. I'd say there was 2qts in there. The point is that that oil is blocking airflow in the bottom 2 or 3 cores of the intercooler. Getting the oil out will make the intercooler more efficient.
 
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