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Discussion Starter #1
Will pulling the VCV on a CP4 fuel pump allow air into the fuel system? I want to pull the valve to check for metal shavings.

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It would be easier to check the fuel filter first. If you go to all the trouble to get to the pump and just take the part that has the screen than you may as well remove the pump and get a new one. If you cut open the filter if you have a pump go bad it will show up there fast.
 

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Will pulling the VCV on a CP4 fuel pump allow air into the fuel system? I want to pull the valve to check for metal shavings.
Of course you will get air in the system - to access the VCV the upper and lower intake have to come off as will the secondary fuel filter in the process. If you have a bad pump failure metal flakes usually show up in the primary filter housing at the frame rail which is the easiest thing to check and based on experience you will likely find more metal in the primary filter than the secondary. Just remove the cap and look inside. Of course, accessing the VCV is the most definitive inspection as that is where metal will collect the most and sometimes a truck comes in with new filters installed by someone trying to fix the problem and the debris is removed. Here is a primary filter cap with debris from a major HPFP failure:
67-metal-in-filter.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #4
ok, I’m installing a new turbo so I have pretty easy access to the vcv, how would I get the air out of the system after pulling the VCV?

Thanks

Of course you will get air in the system - to access the VCV the upper and lower intake have to come off as will the secondary fuel filter in the process. If you have a bad pump failure metal flakes usually show up in the primary filter housing at the frame rail which is the easiest thing to check and based on experience you will likely find more metal in the primary filter than the secondary. Just remove the cap and look inside. Of course, accessing the VCV is the most definitive inspection as that is where metal will collect the most and sometimes a truck comes in with new filters installed by someone trying to fix the problem and the debris is removed. Here is a primary filter cap with debris from a major HPFP failure:
View attachment 159091
Of course you will get air in the system - to access the VCV the upper and lower intake have to come off as will the secondary fuel filter in the process. If you have a bad pump failure metal flakes usually show up in the primary filter housing at the frame rail which is the easiest thing to check and based on experience you will likely find more metal in the primary filter than the secondary. Just remove the cap and look inside. Of course, accessing the VCV is the most definitive inspection as that is where metal will collect the most and sometimes a truck comes in with new filters installed by someone trying to fix the problem and the debris is removed. Here is a primary filter cap with debris from a major HPFP failure:
View attachment 159091
 

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ok, I’m installing a new turbo so I have pretty easy access to the vcv, how would I get the air out of the system after pulling the VCV?
You really won't introduce air into the high pressure system as removing the valve does not seem to allow much fuel to come out. Regardless, once you reassemble the engine simply cycle the ignition to on for 30 seconds 4-6 times which will purge most of the air out. The rest will purge once the engine is started. Don't be alarmed if you do spill fuel when the valve is removed though and if you have to crank the engine a couple of times to get it to fire. Totally normal. This system purges easily on it's own like any other high pressure common rail system.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sweet. Thanks for the info.

You really won't introduce air into the high pressure system as removing the valve does not seem to allow much fuel to come out. Regardless, once you reassemble the engine simply cycle the ignition to on for 30 seconds 4-6 times which will purge most of the air out. The rest will purge once the engine is started. Don't be alarmed if you do spill fuel when the valve is remove though and if you have to crank the engine a couple of times to get it to fire. This system purges easily on it's own like any other high pressure common rail system.
 

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Any help would be greatly appreciated! I have a 2012 f250 and it started idling rough and developed what I’ve been told is a (fuel knock) it threw codes for cylinder #2 and #6 and fuel related issue so I changed those injectors,a mechanic told me they were hanging open. After changing them still no difference but a code was then added something about the fuel pump secondary voltage circuit any ideas or advice before I drop money on a fuel pump or ficm next I hate trying to guess and check !?
Codes throwing are ..
P0266
P0278
P0232
 

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Personally I would just take it to the dealer and let them look at it. It will cost a couple hundred to find out what is wrong. They will include that in to the repair if you let them do the job. So far you have thrown parts at it with the problem still there. Sometimes it's just better to bite the bullet.
 

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Personally I would just take it to the dealer and let them look at it. It will cost a couple hundred to find out what is wrong. They will include that in to the repair if you let them do the job. So far you have thrown parts at it with the problem still there. Sometimes it's just better to bite the bullet.
Thank you and yes think I’ll bring it to a shop today !
 

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Any help would be greatly appreciated! I have a 2012 f250 and it started idling rough and developed what I’ve been told is a (fuel knock) it threw codes for cylinder #2 and #6 and fuel related issue so I changed those injectors,a mechanic told me they were hanging open. After changing them still no difference but a code was then added something about the fuel pump secondary voltage circuit any ideas or advice before I drop money on a fuel pump or ficm next I hate trying to guess and check !?
Codes throwing are ..
P0266
P0278
P0232
I would be willing to bet it has spun a couple of rod bearings. The cylinders that are missing share a rod journal and there is a known issue with bearing failures. When mine failed the 1st sign of trouble was a misfire. There's some information on what I found here Engine Failure . If that is what they find I would be interested in the condition of the bearings. If it is what I think it is #2 & #6 rod bearings will be spun along with #2 main. The rest of them will look good.
 
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