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Just purchased a '19 XLT PS longbed crew cab. I bought it from a dealer who is at a bit of a distance from me, and as part of the deal, they promised to bring it to me. Great!

Got it last week with about 260 miles on it, and I have put another 100 on it. I noticed that if I made a hard right or left turn in a parking lot, that I would hear a clicking noise from the front end. I thought it odd, but it didn't registered until tonight that it was likely the 4wd hubs were locked. I went out and checked, and sure enough, the hubs were manually locked. Damn!

To say that I am pissed is an understatement.

I remember with my old truck, that when I would forget to remove the 4wd, that it would darn near hop if I tried a turn on pavement. I'm hoping that since it had not been engaged into 4wd, that the front diff had enough slip that the front end likely did not get damaged, but I am here looking for opinions.

Can I have your thoughts please? :crying:
 

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The hubs were locked, but the driveshaft from the transfer Case wasn’t engaged. Didn’t hurt anything but maybe burned some extra fuel. Lots of people leave front hubs engaged during the winter, myself included. Wouldn’t worry about it. I even lock mine at times just to spin the bearing for a few miles
 

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It should be fine. I lock my hubs in the fall and don't unlock them until May.
DENNY
 

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Jeeps don't even have locking hubs up front anymore and they do just fine. I'm honestly kind of surprised they haven't gone that route on the trucks.

Two good reasons. They say that engaging the front axles and turning the gears and shafts affects fuel economy. Second, I can't tell you how many times I have had a line on a repair order that says "knocking noise when turning" due to the front universal joints on tight turns.
 

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Two good reasons. They say that engaging the front axles and turning the gears and shafts affects fuel economy. Second, I can't tell you how many times I have had a line on a repair order that says "knocking noise when turning" due to the front universal joints on tight turns.
Agreed, but as trucks have become more car-like and user friendly I figured it'd be one of the things that changed. I've seen several trucks stuck/struggling in snow and ice because they didn't have their hubs locked. Went up to them to offer help and asked if the hubs were locked and they looked at me like I was speaking a foreign language. Locked the hubs for them and they were all set and drove off without issue.
 

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Chevys are locked all the time. Have been for years.
Doesn’t hurt anything.
 

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I prefer the manual locking hubs. I can unlock and then go to 4x4 low when backing the trailer/5th wheel. It is much easier on the auto tranny and so slow it makes backing easy. Manual transfer case can also be placed in neutral and truck towed at for long distance without removing the driveshaft. That is what I would call user friendly.
DENNY
 

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ESOF hubs can be disabled by simply unplugging a solenoid under the hood in the rare case I want to use 2wd low range. The transfer case can also be put into neutral for 4-down towing. It’s not as easy to get it into neutral as it was with the floor shifter, but then you don’t have to worry about it being bumped into neutral accidentally either.
 

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Good info!! When I was looking for a truck I passed on some good deals due to ESOF. How do you get it to Neutral?
DENNY
 

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Did I mention it wasn’t as easy as with a floor shifter? :)

Four-wheel Drive Vehicles Equipped with an Electronic-shift Transfer Case
Only tow a four-wheel drive vehicle that has an electronic-shift transfer case with all wheels on the ground. To do this, place the transfer case in its neutral position and engage the four-wheel-down towing feature.
Perform the steps in the following section after positioning your vehicle behind the tow vehicle and properly securing them together.
Note: Make sure you properly secure your vehicle to the tow vehicle.
Four-wheel-down Towing
1. Put the ignition in the on position, but do not start the engine. If your vehicle has an ignition key, turn the key to on. If your vehicle has intelligent access, press the engine START/STOP button once without pressing the brake pedal.
2. Press and hold the brake pedal.
3. Rotate the four-wheel drive switch to
2H.
4. Shift the transmission to neutral (N).
5. Rotate the four-wheel drive switch from 2H to 4L and back to 2H five times within seven seconds.
Note: If completed successfully, the information display shows a message indicating that your vehicle is safe to tow with all wheels on the ground.
Note: If you do not see the message in the display, you must perform the procedure again from the beginning.
Note: You may hear an audible noise as the transfer case shifts into its neutral position. This is normal.
6. Leave the transmission in neutral (N) and turn the ignition as far as it will go toward the off position (it will not turn fully off when the transmission is in neutral). If your vehicle has an ignition key, you must leave the key in the ignition while towing. To lock and unlock your vehicle, use the keyless entry keypad or extra set of keys. If your vehicle has intelligent access, press the engine START/STOP button once without pressing the brake pedal. You do not need to leave your keys in the vehicle. You can lock and unlock your vehicle as you normally do.
7. Release the brake pedal.
 

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Okay, please clarify how to use 4x4.

I have for the first time a Super Duty 4x4.

On my F150, I turn the ESOF knob to 4x4 and go.....is that not the same on the Super Duty?

On the Super Duty there is the ESOF knob, but on the front wheels, there is a knob that says LOCK and AUTO.

If I want to use 4x4, say in snowy conditions, is it not as simple as turning the knob while driving?
 

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If you have auto locking hubs they will automatically lock and unlock, sometimes it takes a few seconds. Having the manual lock lets you lock the hubs ahead of time, or if you are having an issue with the auto lock hub and now you only have to worry about the transfer case shifting. I would say one of the keys to keeping the ESOF system working well is to use it every few weeks even during the summer. If you don't have any dirt roads or raining days, just switch it in and out of 4x4 on a straight stretch of road. I lock my manual hubs in the fall and unlock in the spring, I have manual transfer case that I shift in and out of 4x4 on most trip daily. In the summer when it is raining I also use 4x4 on steep hills, especially when empty because the rear just won't hold the power some days. I don't worry a lot if the road gets dry for a ways, stress to the system is cause by tight turns with the 4x4 engaged. That I do avoid whenever I can.
DENNY
 

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I would study your Owners Manual for ESOF instructions specific to your model year.

Like Dwnny auggested, use it in the rain or gravel in the summer for a few miles to keep it in good shape.
 

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When one considers the Electronic Locking Differential option, people need to realize that IF you think you need "4L" to back in a trailer use the ELD. Works like a champ. Pulled out plenty of people I'm always asked "Did you shift to 4H/4L"...I say "Didn't need to" and just smile.


Ford did put in a good idea with the ESOF. They left the ability to manually LOCK in the hubs. I always tell people if your already stuck it's too late to use ESOF. Get out, turn to LOCK, drive out.
@DENNY: Since this is a 2017 section, be advised that the "older" variants of ESOF need to be on a roll back if I recall correctly. No 4-wheel down towing on those trucks.
 
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