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So their filters will not remove the dispersed water nor do they say they will yet people somehow get the idea that they do?? I mean that sounds like a poor choice by a person not doing their research or even understanding the products they are buying.
You summed it up but to be fair, with a pricetag like that, I can see why a guy might wrongfully assume that filter will do everything...and make his morning coffee.

Its really great Ford_Doc put in the effort to bust this myth.
 

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I also love the way they exaggerate the cost of a complete fuel system replacement though I have no doubt people are paying too much because they did not do their homework. They (Diesel Site) State "and the dealers are told to not spend any more time on the truck, except to give the customer an estimate for a complete fuel system replacement. This is a cost of $12,000- $18,000 depending on whether you brought it to them when you could still drive it, or the fuel pump went south and damaged even more components" Starting off if you paid anywhere near $12k for a complete high pressure fuel system replacement and fuel tank cleaning with new filters, you are an idiot. Do your homework people.



(we are talking about water here, not DEF contamination and an engine that was run until it failed - whole other ball game)
 

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Sure, but I don't see any need to drain it that long. a good 10 seconds will let you know if you need to drain more. Drain it into a clear container and let it sit a few minutes to see if any water settles out.
‘No need to worry about how many seconds you drain it. Time means nothing at all. Just catch a half pint or so in a clear glass jar, give it time to settle & look for water in the bottom. I do this before I start the truck in the morning just to give any water time to settle in the low point above the drain valve (I’ve never had any water). If the fuel that you catch in the jar looks clear then chances are that there is no water suspended. I let my sample sit overnight & look at it again just to be sure. ‘No need to overthink this simple procedure.
 

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So basically what Ford Doc is saying is, if you don't know Jack about automotive fuel systems you shouldn't even own a diesel. (no condescending tone here, right?) Pardon the hell out of the average truck owner! The FACT that you remiss is the FORD DEALERS are the ones that quote these stupendous prices for these repairs and having friends at the local FORD dealer it doesn't escape me that the techs actually earn a tidy sum when these issues present themselves. At least with the Dieselsite filters I CAN visually see if any water or other foreign substance is in the fuel filter bowls.


Dealers quoting upwards of $9000.00 and we're the "IDIOTS"? That's pretty crass. I respected you as a technician but your integrity just went in file 13. Next time tell us what you REALLY think of those who pay your salary.
 

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I love you Bart. :heart: Apparently that went... right past you two miles high. Do I really need to explain my last post? Do I reeeeeally? Now my feelings are hurt. Perhaps I'll just let you stew.
 

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Sorry to go off on you Ford Doc. I understand that the Dieselsite filter is not the "cure" for the WIF issues that these trucks can experience. But I look at it as at least one more layer of protection that I can put between me and a large repair bill. I understand you were blazing their sales pitch with the high dollar estimates but I stopped working at a Ford dealer in 2011 when these trucks were fairly new on the streets and having been in both service management and an advisor, you and I both know the extreme markups on ALL repairs. I just hit RED ZONE when you made it sound like Dieselsite was making it sound worse than it is when, in reality they're not far off the mark. And to label the consumers that don't know any better "idiots" is just wrong when the very dealer you work at promotes soaking the customers on these repairs. It is what it is. I got tired of pouring salt in the wound when folks had these catastrophic issues.

It would seem that some of you guys with the experience and ingenuity would have some suggestions on a fix for this. I mean damn, the engineers would call our techs to see what they we were doing to fix some of these various issues that plagued different vehicles from time to time. They had the theories but you guys have the hands on experience. I know the fuel system kit can be had at my cost for something in the $3-$4K range but the average owner has no idea other than the retail estimate that we give them. That said, I have heard of a "Fail Safe" kit that keeps the metal particles out of the fuel system should it self destruct, but still nothing to prevent water from entering as you advised earlier. Are you familiar? Again, my apologies. I probably should have taken a breathe before I responded.


https://www.accuratediesel.com/6-7l-powerstroke-disaster-prevention-kit.html
 

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@badbart Don't apologize for anything. There are people who have built a cheaper fuel filter kit pre-OEM system. The guy took the time to make it right from fittings to filters.

People here are mixing arguments about two topics/problems. Best way to describe the problems: Water occurs in diesel either as an emulsion (a mixture of water and fuel with the water dispersed uniformly throughout the fuel) or as free water (water that has separated out to form a visible interface between the heavier water and the lighter fuel floating on the water).
 

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Dissolved water is not known to have any damaging effect on fuel system components.

Really? I heartily disagree with that statement. Water is water. If it is inside of your fuel injection system it can and will do damage. Period.

Think about that and let it sink in.

  • If I push you into a swimming pool, do you get wet? (free water)
  • If I spray you with a garden hose, do you get wet? (dispersed water)
  • If I spray you with water in a spray bottle, do you get wet? (emulsified)

The answer is, you get wet. IT DOES NOT MATTER WHAT FORM THE WATER IS IN WHEN IT REACHES THE FUEL INJECTION SYSEM. IF IT GETS THERE THE DOOR IS OPEN FOR WEAR AND CORROSION TO OCCUR. The longer the parts inside of the system are exposed to water (or any other contamination) the more extensive the damage will become. In any case, once the the process has begun beyond a certain point or crucial components have been directly affected the damage progressively worsens until a failure occurs. I think the person who wrote that article either misunderstood what was said or someone does not fully understand what they are talking about. Hopefully, just perhaps the idea behind that statement has more to do with being able to separate the "dispersed" water?
 

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