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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i saw that my driver side engine bolt is missing. Anyone know what size it is? hoping to get one at home depot or something

thanks 92 f250 4x4 idi dana 50
 

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I can't help on the diameter or thread pitch (though I'd guess the same as gassers), but I recommend you live up to your username & get it at a JY instead of a hardware store.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
lol yeah junk yards here don't have engines, I'll go to the parts store buy one, match the bolt at home depot and return the part. I figured it didn't hurt to ask here.
 

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junk yards here don't have engines...
Huh? My brother never mentioned a problem finding them near G'ville. What city are you near?
 

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It can't be all that complicated, pull a bolt from the other side then go to a parts house and buy one like it. Look at the markings on the head as to whether it's a grade 5 or 8.
 

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^^^^^ If it's the OP's only means of transportation, I wonder about the prudence of driving it with two engine mount bolts removed.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
its pretty much my DD, i actually think its been missing for over a yr now. I'm only missing one bolt on driver side but the engine lifts off about 2-3 inches when i hit the gas.
I live in Orlando which is full of city people. Gvill is where the good *******/country people areas are. Orl ships old fords up there probably lol. I just ordered a new one. I'll probably return it once i match the bolt up.
thanks everyone
 

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I'll try to put it as easy to understand as possible. He can remove a comparable bolt (that means one like the missing one), measure it, width and length, fine or standard thread, put it back in, go buy one like the one removed then put that one in.
 

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.... when i hit the gas.
Hit the gas? What's that?... ;)

I'll try to put it as easy to understand as possible. He can remove a comparable bolt (that means one like the missing one), measure it, width and length, fine or standard thread, put it back in, go buy one like the one removed then put that one in.
Measure it with what? Do you think most (or even more than a very few) DIY mechanics have the measuring tools to determine a fastener's diameter and pitch? Given the truck is typical of its generation and a complete mix of metric and inch-fractional fasteners, with no evident rhyme or reason as to which is used where, can one really be expected to differentiate between, say, a 9/16"-18 thread and an M14x1.25 bolt, without a nut to match it to? I wish I were that good.....

Yeah, in SOME cases you can narrow down between metric and SAE by how it's grade-marked. That's assuming it IS grade marked.

(I suppose I'd ball-park a metric estimate, and its closest SAE match, then go up and down one size of each, buy one of all six and try them 'till one fit, then return the others....)
 

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NOT referring to the original poster, but anyone who can't remove a bolt and determine its size and what it is has no business removing it. Worse comes to worse, there's usually a high school neighborhood kid who takes auto shop that could be of help.
 
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Even DIY'ers should have a tape measure or ruler. Length and diameter should be simple, SAE/Metric and pitch maybe not.
 
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It is really quite simple. Take a bolt out of the other side, take it down to your favorite parts store such as NAPA, Autozone, Advance Auto, or any of the other automotive parts stores in the area and hand it to the counter person and tell them that you want one exactly like it. They will in turn take it to their bolt supply and stick the threaded end into their set up for checking bolt size and thread pitch. They will then reach into a drawer that contains other bolts and pull one out for you.

I don't know if I would go to Home Depot or Lows for a bolt, but a actual hardware store or automotive parts store for one of these bolts.
 
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NOT referring to the original poster, but anyone who can't remove a bolt and determine its size and what it is has no business removing it.
Well that covers probably 90% of the DIYers on this or any other DIY-oriented forum. I guess all the hardware stores around the country should just take down those fastener-matching assist thingies they have in their fastener sections, since anyone going into that section had better know exactly what s/he needs.

I suspect if the OP could have determined the bolt size details by removing a counterpart, he would have, rather than asking here.
 

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Sometimes it's easier to ask, than to crawl under the truck and look. Since no one here seems to know the diameter, length, and thread pitch it appears that he is going to have to do what he was trying to avoid. I myself don't know the information he asked for, and I'm not going to go crawl under my truck to find out either. At least not until I have to.
 
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I'm only missing one bolt on driver side but the engine lifts off about 2-3 inches...
That lift isn't caused by the missing bolt - the engine mount is almost certainly broken. Stick a prybar in there & look.

. . . .

That may be why the bolt is missing - a PO or mechanic might have started the job of changing the broken mount, broken the bolt off, and just given up. Grab an inspection mirror & flashlight...
I just ordered a new one. I'll probably return it once i match the bolt up.
Hardware store bolts (regardless if they CLAIM to be the same grade/material class) are NEVER as strong, tough, accurate, or durable as OE fasteners. And how CHEAP do you have to be to return a used bolt??? Put some blue threadlocker on it so it doesn't fall out again, and just leave it in there.
Measure it with what?
A ruler generally works well for me. But sometimes I cheat & use a really-rare, specialized tool like a wrench or a drill index.
...a complete mix of metric and inch-fractional fasteners, with no evident rhyme or reason as to which is used where...
There's actually a VERY simple & ~95%-effective way to guess if a fastener will be inch or metric: if it was engineered (or RE-engineered) after ~1987, it's probably metric. If it's older, it's probably inch. That applies to each PART of any particular fastener - not necessarily the whole thing, and certainly not to assemblies like "the engine" or "the frame", and also not even to single parts like "the block" or "the exhaust manifold". For example, on my '95 4.9L, the frontmost manifold bolt was engineered in the late 60s (when the engine was called the 300ci) to thread into the cylinder head, so those threads are inch. The original bolt head was an inch-size hex, so older engines have that. But in '87 when it went EFI & became the 4.9L, the accessory brackets were re-engineered for a serpentine belt, and one of them mounts to a stud that was added to that old manifold bolt. So the new stud on the old bolt's head is metric, and takes a metric nut. The hex was re-engineered at the same time to metric, but the cyl. head threads stayed inch. Inch & metric on one fastener, but there's a reason for it: they couldn't change the old inch cyl. heads to accept a metric manifold bolt, so the cyl. heads continued to be threaded for inch there, and so the new manifold bolt (with stud) had to also have inch threads to go into the cyl. head.



You have to know some of the history of changes to these trucks to anticipate what system is used on each fastener, but once you learn it, it becomes almost reflex to grab the correct wrench set.
 

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If you take the time to read the FIRST post, you would see the mount isn't broken, the bolt is indeed missing.
 
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Sometimes it's easier to ask, than to crawl under the truck and look. Since no one here seems to know the diameter, length, and thread pitch it appears that he is going to have to do what he was trying to avoid. I myself don't know the information he asked for, and I'm not going to go crawl under my truck to find out either. At least not until I have to.
......X2
 

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If you take the time to read the FIRST post, you would see the mount isn't broken...
I did read it, but you must have sharper eyes than I do because I don't see anything in it about the mount being intact, or even being CHECKED.
...the bolt is indeed missing.
I don't think anyone is disputing that.
 

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There's actually a VERY simple & ~95%-effective way to guess if a fastener will be inch or metric: if it was engineered (or RE-engineered) after ~1987, it's probably metric. If it's older, it's probably inch. That applies to each PART of any particular fastener - not necessarily the whole thing, and certainly not to assemblies like "the engine" or "the frame", and also not even to single parts like "the block" or "the exhaust manifold". For example, on my '95 4.9L, the frontmost manifold bolt was engineered in the late 60s (when the engine was called the 300ci) to thread into the cylinder head, so those threads are inch. The original bolt head was an inch-size hex, so older engines have that. But in '87 when it went EFI & became the 4.9L, the accessory brackets were re-engineered for a serpentine belt, and one of them mounts to a stud that was added to that old manifold bolt.
You might want to rethink all that. With a few exceptions, the only metric bolts and nuts on my '91 is the frame and crossmember bolts, everything else is standard or SAE. The only metric bolt on the engine is a 10MM bolt retaining the vacuum pump bracket. And I bought it new in Sept. of 1991 so I'm fairly familiar with it from bumper to bumper.
 
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