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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I bought in 1999 I F350 7.3 powerstroke, four-door, long bed with a leveling kit and some type of aftermarket bracket for the track bar. The previous owner had put a brand new pair of Federal Couragia 315/75r16 e load tires on the front (at this point they have about 1500 miles on them)

But the rears are bald lol 馃ぃ

So I found a nearly new pair of Eldorado Mud Claw 315/75r16 d load tires... 8 ply tires (my gauge said 20/32 tread depth)... So honestly for $50 how could I say no?

anyway I went ahead and bought them then I got them home and realized that they were load range D I figured it was still better than some bald tires

So I threw some balancing beads in each tire and mounted them up and I've been running them on the back

But I've been thinking about it and I realize at 3195 weight per tire I might be cutting it a little close so I guess the question is if I am going to run these should I run them in the front or run them in the back?

Or is it just too much of a risk and I need to dump them and get some more e-rated tires?
 

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What are you hauling in the bed and what does it weigh?

For most out there D rated tires will work quite well, where with others the minimum rating would be the E's.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What are you hauling in the bed and what does it weigh?
It's not uncommon for me to have a bed full of fire wood...

But we are getting ready to get a fifth wheel camper
 

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I'd run them as long as I could. While wood weights a good amount I wouldn't worry about it with it loaded. I hauled a lot of wood with D rated tires, it wasn't at freeway speeds but just off of a hill and home with max speeds being 40 mph.

Now for the 5th wheel I'd get the E rated ones.
 
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Run it over the scales, see what the rear axle weight is, empty it will be less than the front axle. Subtract that from combined tire load rating. That should be close to what you can haul in the bed. Get the E rated tires for the 5th wheel. On a side note look at the build date of the tire. I had a nice looking set of tires on a F350 DRW I picked up, never looked at the build date. 14 years old!! Tread let loose and took out front fender. Repair was the same price of the 7 new tires. DENNY
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I had a nice looking set of tires on a F350 DRW I picked up, never looked at the build date. 14 years old!! Tread let loose and took out front fender. Repair was the same price of the 7 new tires. DENNY
0816 is the date code... So if I read that correctly it would be the last week of February 2016 so they're about 4 years old
 

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I believe you will find your truck weight empty to be 7200-7500 lbs. The front axle will be about 4800 and the rear 2500. Most smaller 5th wheel trailers will take 1000-1200 lbs on the pin. Add the weight of the hitch to this (mine, with the mounting hardware is a bit under 200 lbs--I can barely carry the hitch). Check the door placard for your rear axle and gross weight limit.

A CAT scale at a truck stop will give you all 3 weights at one time (front axle, rear axle, gross weight). Subtract the gross weight from the max, subtract the weight of passengers and gear, and this will leave what you can add on for hitch and trailer.

I had a '99 F250 when I bought my fiver. It pulled it ok, but it was about 500 lbs over the 9900 gross allowance. I bought a 2008 F350 DRW and wish I had even more capacity.

Those tires you now have on the back will, in my non-legal opinion, do fine for most of your home chore loads when aired up to the max. The pressure noted on the sidewall gives the max load the tire can support. The door sticker will likely always be lower than that.
 

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If you're really good at dismounting and mounting tires, then maybe you could get a pair of e rated tires and just switch back and forth depending upon whether you will be carrying a heavy load or a light load.

Or even easier, maybe you could sell those d rated tires for $50 and get your money back, then you wouldn't have to switch them back and forth every time.
 
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