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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 99 F-350 that's been sitting in the driveway since August of 2012. I have been wanting to try and get it started so I can start using it as my daily driver again, but am concerned about the level of rust/rot on the frame and whether or not it would be too compromised to drive safely.

I've crawled around underneath and couldn't find any obvious cracks/holes, but found several areas with deep pitting after scraping away large flakes of metal with a wire brush. The worst areas were where the front leaf spring hangers connected to the frame. I was able to get one decent pic of the front/driver side hanger before I realized the undercarriage hadn't been cleared of wasps as I had previously thought.

Tomorrow I plan on more wire brushing and hammering to try and expose any holes/soft spots. If this doesn't turn up anything suspect, would you say to proceed forward? Are there any other clear go/no go indicators besides cracks/holes/soft spots that you look for when trying to determine if a frame is too rotted to be driven safely?

Thanks
 

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We had a '96 F150 with a heavily rusted frame and found the brakelines had deteriorated as well. We replaced one after it ruptured and then another ruptured and we just replaced all remaining.

And some of the tabs which held the fuel line also had rotted away.

We quit putting any weight in it and just used it for a daily driver.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yea, I plan on replacing corroded brake lines after I get it started. I know that at least one of them corroded all the way through and started leaking brake fluid while it was sitting there.
 

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There's a fair amount of safety factor built into the frames, which would lead me to believe that your rig is likely OK for continued use (based on that one photo). There might be a concern about crumple strength if you were in an accident, but for daily driving, probably not a concern.


I've got a 51 Chevy 1/2 ton project truck that has a pretty thin spot on the top of the arch over the rear axle from where the bed wood was sitting on it holding moisture. I'm planning on patching that, but otherwise I'm not going to worry about frame strength. Of course, I probably will never load it to capacity either.
 

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That was nice of ford to paint that thing when new.
Looks pretty sound. The top ledge look rough. You need to pull the liner and get in there once the spawns of the devil are evicted. You need to smack that baby everywhere with a heavy ball peen hammer. It will make the pack rust fall off and give you a feel for soundness wear gloves and goggles not glasses. That stuff will find a way past the sides of glasses and go into your eyebal...Guaranteed!
Get out the angle grinder and fire extinguisher. Start grinding...red oxide primer. What you can't reach use Eastwood Rust Converter and top coat. Wear gloves. You don't remember your last tetanus shot but I know about when your next one is.:lol::lol:.
If that was a boxed frame, the springs would be up inside the frame or the truck would have snapped in the middle.
 

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Get out the angle grinder and fire extinguisher. Start grinding...red oxide primer. What you can't reach use Eastwood Rust Converter and top coat. Wear gloves.
Nick, I think it was about 5-6 weeks ago you posted a couple photos of the front wheel well & frame of your own rig.

Are your instructions above how you did yours? I remember it sure looked like new.
 

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I used Krylon Fusion on wheel liners after cleaning with acetone, let dry, wiped down with rag soaked with ammonia. Do outside with a respirator, heavy dishwashing gloves.
Apply thin coats with about five minutes between coats.
 

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****Note*****
Look at rectangular hole foreword of the shock tower. That is so I factory worker can insert a plate that holds two nuts.
Look at the oval shaped hole at 1or2 o'clock. That is a hole to accept and anchor on a tie down chain.
Both of these holes have water pouring in them going down a wet road. This us the beginning of a boxed frame horn.
Place Gorrila tape over these holes to keep a lot of water out.
After your painting has set, you can pump ATF in there with a pump up landscaping spray tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sorry for the late reply, but just wanted to say thanks to everyone for their help. It's greatly appreciated!

Haven't had much of a chance to assess the rust situation any further due to the holidays and rain for the last few days, but went ahead and bought two new batteries in order to commit myself to trying to get it running again.
 

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Looking at the spring hanger in your picture.....shouldn't there be a bolt head or nut sticking out that is suppose to let the spring pivot. Just curious.
 
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