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Discussion Starter #1
Hello friends, unfortunately I can't get the tools for the inner front axle shaft seals (vacuum hubs) here in Germany. They have the ORC numbers 6695 (older models) and 6697 (newer models).
Has anyone already made these tools themselves and has the right dimensions? I have all the machines for metalworking at my disposal. Thank you
 

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Hadn't seen that video before. He did a good job with it, thanks Hartwig!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
the seals are supposed to be used at a certain depth, I suppose the tools are for that.
 

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They have to go in evenly AND at a specific depth.
 

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You can make a tool easily from a 12" long piece of 1-1/4" pipe and a floor flange and cap. I've used that a number of times to put the large inner knuckle seal on the stub shaft. Works like a charm. You do have to reduce the outside diameter of the flange a bit so it fits within the stationary outer part of the seal. As far as using the OEM special tool to seat the axle and seal in the knuckle, I've never found that necessary. The bearing/hub assembly takes care of getting the axle in the right depth.
For you in Germany, that would be 32mm nominal Schedule 40 pipe.
Actually, it may be 1-1/2" (40mm) pipe. Someone here can confirm which. Member DENNY has the tool in question that we've both used.
Or you can measure the diameter of the axle shaft - if it's less than 1.38 inches (35mm) then it's 1-1/4" (32mm) pipe.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I think it is better for the seal to be set to the right depth with the right tool. It could be, that the seal will be damaged if it is pushed to the right depth by the axle shaft??

 

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I think it is better for the seal to be set to the right depth with the right tool. It could be, that the seal will be damaged if it is pushed to the right depth by the axle shaft??
My buddy and I have never had an issue with using the home-built tool and just putting the axle and seal in by hand, followed by the hub/bearing unit. The outer (stationary) portion of the hub/bearing unit contacts the stationary part of the seal that goes into the knuckle.
If you want to spend the $$ on the special tool, that's your choice, but I doubt it would cause you a problem if you used the home-built tool.
 

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+1 on the home-built tool.
 

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Do as Kevin suggests, the tool I believe is 1 1/4 inch size I am out of state so cannot check at this time. It will seat just fine once assembled.
DENNY
 

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Discussion Starter #13
thanks guys. How deep must the seal sit inside? Or does this press down to the right depth when inserting the axle shaft into the knuckle?
 

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Hartwig - got your PM. Looks like you have the answers to your questions here but... The seal tool is important because it will install the seal onto the axle shaft WITHOUT DAMAGING it. The seal seats on a machined edge but when you install the shaft back into the axle housing the seal will need to be lightly pressed in to a specific depth also to prevent damage to the seal. The most common symptom caused by damage to these seals is vacuum leaks that prevent the automatic hubs from working. The seal tool performs both procedures.

Search for the proper tool number on Amazon as there are some inexpensive knock-off's available for as little as $50 USD
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I'll do that, thank you.
The problem is often that they don't ship to Germany.
But I am a mechanic who likes to work 100%, even if that is sometimes not necessary.
My vehicles often drive to remote corners of the world, where everything has to work 100%. Therefore I am very accurate in repair and maintenance.
 
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