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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have noticed a small drip coming from the torque converter cover plate. Pulled it off and at first, looked to be the oil pan. Cleaned everything up and went back a few days later. Drip was back. I smelled the drip and it appears to be diesel. Looked up on top and found fuel in the valley. Not all over, just at the rear under the turbo pedestal. Nothing under or around the fuel filter bowl. Nothing toward the front of valley. Anyone have suggestions on what to look at. The truck is a 97 California model with split shot injectors. And get this, only has 62k miles. Not driven often. Usually once a week or so. I do use it to tow a trailer for vacation, which is coming up in less than a month. If I don't find it, is there any issue towing with the slight leak?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Weep hole on the fuel pump.

Towing with a leak is no problem unless it gets worse or if the fuel pump goes out on you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Weep hole on the fuel pump.

Towing with a leak is no problem unless it gets worse or if the fuel pump goes out on you.

Is there an easy way to have a good look at the fuel pump? Exact location? I've read the turbo has to come off to change it on the 97 Calif trucks.
 

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Not sure if the 94-97's share the SuperDuty 7.3L's metal fuel tubing to the rear of the passenger side head that gets a hole rubbed in it by the hold-down clamp, but it's worth checking closely with an inspection mirror and strong light.
Leaks never heal themselves, so if you don't want to be stranded, I would get that fixed ASAP. I changed out fuel hoses a couple of years ago, except for the one that was hard to get to. I paid for my laziness a couple weeks ago when I smelled fuel and finally saw fuel dribbling out of the engine when I pulled into the driveway. Had to fix it before the next morning. Lucky I wasn't on the road.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I had a good look at the valley. The part I was looking at was indeed, the fuel pump. Not a fun thing to get to. I did some cleaning and overall, there wasn't as much fuel puddled up. I was able to reach around most of the fitting and pump itself, didn't feel or see anything on my hand after inspecting. The rubber hoses on on the fuel pump showed no signs of cracks or leaks, hose clamps were tight. I got back under the truck and there were some drips building up on the bottom of the starter, by the bolts, and also where the converter inspection plate mounts.

Now I am wondering if I have two leaks going on, oil and fuel. Not very big, just annoying. I was able to look at the back of the block and didn't see a trail of fuel or dirt accumulated where it would have been wet or damp from a leak.

Guess time will tell.
 

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Here is a link to a write up that Sam Miller did years ago.

As for removing the banjo bolt on a 97 Cal truck I believe that is where the 1 1/4" bent wrench comes in handy. You might also want to contact Patrick Feeley on the site here. He'll know what you need to do for replacing a pump on a Cal truck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here is a link to a write up that Sam Miller did years ago.

As for removing the banjo bolt on a 97 Cal truck I believe that is where the 1 1/4" bent wrench comes in handy. You might also want to contact Patrick Feeley on the site here. He'll know what you need to do for replacing a pump on a Cal truck.
Thanks bugman! Good info! I'll touch bases with Patrick
 

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I haven't done the pump on my 97 yet (and not looking forward to it), but need to. I don't see how to get to the banjo bolt without removing the turbo. The fuel line assembly is much longer and has the damper attached to the top of it to complicate things. One might be able to fabricate a wrench to get all the way around the back of the turbo, but it may not be worth it or even feasible. I've read where guys have used an air hammer to loosen the damper, but I'm not keen on that idea. I plan to remove the turbo on mine. I will probably replace the following since I only want to do this once:

Fuel Pump
Damper and Damper Seal
Banjo Fitting Washers (Seals)
Both sets of Pedestal O-rings
Collector Gasket
Up-Pipe Donuts
Fuel Line-to Head Fitting Seals on each head

I have most of the parts just waiting. I've already re-sealed the fuel bowl and replaced the short rubber fuel lines and clamps or I would do those as well. If I had the extra cash, I would probably gut the EBPV (or just get the ready-made outlet) and get the non-EBPV Pedestal too. Of course, I would clean the heck out of everything so it would at least look good for a day! Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the input, Patrick. I checked with dieselorings.com and Bob said most people with Calif trucks change the banjo bolt fuel line to a 49 state part. He said the pulse dampener is prone to cracking. Mine is original so is 18+ years old. Still not certain what is leaking fuel but may go ahead and change fuel pump, banjo lines, hoses and put a seal kit in the pressure regulator and fuel bowl. The ebpv was gutted a long time ago. Anything else I should do while in there? Any special gaskets needed when turbo is off? Like to make one order from dieselorings.com.

Does anyone have thought on going with a 49 state banjo bolt fuel line compared to the Calif part? Does the split shot need the dampener? What does it actually do?

Thanks!
 

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Banjo bolt isn't that hard.
Don't swear it.
Far as I understand it (never seen one though) all the dampener does is dampens the fuel pressure to keep it more consistent. With any mechanical pump, there will be a slight fluctuation.

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I'm not sure I've seen a definitive post on deleting the damper. The SD's did end up using the electric fuel pump which would have a more consistent pressure, so I'm not sold on deleting the damper. A regular banjo bolt is no big deal, but the Cali banjo bolt is a big deal to get to. Glen, if you do want to switch to the 49-state stuff, here are the part numbers:

Fuel Line Assembly, Metal (supply from fuel pump banjo to heads, 49-state)
(Ford) F4TZ-9A564-A

Fuel Pump, Banjo Fitting (49-state)
(Ford) F4TZ-9R549-A
(International) 1821624C92

I can't say whether the 49-state fuel line head fittings are the same as the Cali's or not, but you will need the seals for them. If you are removing the turbo, you will need two sets of pedestal O-rings and a collector gasket. Cheers!
 

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Really. Well, glad I'll never have to deal with one then. Lol

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So, in talking to a Ford mechanic at my reserve Coast Guard unit, he says he does not take off the turbo to change out fuel pumps. He works from the front of the engine, to the back. He pulls out the fuel filter housing, to access the pump. Does that sound right to anyone else?

I think I have finally pinpointed my leak source. The very short fuel line between the fuel filter housing and the fuel pump. Same mechanic says the "square" o-rings in there go bad and need fixing. Says I can take the filter housing out to get in there easily. Any thoughts? I've had trouble online locating the part numbers for those "square" o-rings.
 

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Another question, is the large black disk in this picture the California pulse shot whatever? If so, I finally know for certain I don't have a California truck.

 

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Yeah, that's it.
Can't say on removing the turbo with having the CA truck.
I never have on mine to do the pump. But I did always pull the bowl.
The hoses between the bowl and pump are common leakers. Along with the filter restriction sensor.

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well, I got up in the engine bay and had a good look around, as good as I could. Not much of anything under the fuel bowl and around that area. The only fuel I can see is directly under the damper/banjo bolt fuel lines. Haven't been able to get a mirror under there to try and see what may be leaking. Haven't driven truck in a short while. Still appears to be running down the back of the block and dripping off of one of the starter bolts. Weird as the puddle is in a contained part of the valley. Read that it could also be one, or both, of the fittings where the metal lines connect to the back of the heads. If the puddle is caused by the damper, once I get it removed, how is the damper removed and then new one screwed on to the fuel line and tightened? I don't see any fitting on the damper, just from photos, to use a wrench to tighten. Looks like after 18 years I will pull off the turbo and pedestal, fuel bowl, pump with banjo bolt lines and install new seal kits in everything, and change the pump, hoses and assorted goodies. While doing this, should I change the fuel return lines from the heads to the regulator? They would add $60 to the project, worth changing due to age and not mileage? Any other things to work on while in there? With only 62k miles, all repairs would be due to age and preventive maintenance.

Thanks to all for your input!

GE
 

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Imo, the return lines are worth changing.
I've had one blow.

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
When all of the parts arrive, what is the best way/tool to remove and install the dampener? Read some use a vise grip clamped to the edge and turn it that way, not sure I want to do that on a new part. Maybe a rubber strap wrench around the perimeter? I have a nice parts order for Dieselorings.com. Since the truck is 18 years old, I am going to replace as many o-rings and seals as I can. Also, the return hoses and installing a regulator repair kit. I need to check the fuel pressure, what is the best method to do this? Last question, do I remove the turbo from the pedestal then remove pedestal or remove both at once by unbolting the pedestal? I haven't worked on the turbo so I am unfamiliar with the removal. Have heard to spray the bolts with PB Blaster or another penetrating oil well before attempting removing the bolts.
 

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I couldn't tell you on the dampener. Never seen one myself.
For the turbo, you have to pull it with the pedestal. The 2 easy bolts up front. One under the exhaust outlet. (You can pull the outlet for this one. Helps for a tad more room)
Then the bastard one on the drivers side back. It's between the pedestal and up pipe collector. Quarter inch drive with a swivel helps.

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