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Discussion Starter #1
Good day all, My 16 6.7 19000 miles is stalling at low rpm. changed the fuel filters and is continuing to intermittently die when I come to lower rpm, seems to run fine at hi way speed. Will start only after cycling key and pushing accelerator pedal to the floor. The fuel pump is still making noise after filter replacement. Any help will be appreciated.
 

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Sounds like you didn't lube the o-ring with oil and tighten it till the stops meet. You probably have an air leak. The fuel pump might be sucking some air by the o-ring.

I would lay under the truck and look to see if the stops meet. If not, then try tightening it till they meet or the better option is to remove the cup, lube the o-ring and then re-tighten the cup til the stops meet. Cycle the key 6 times per your owners manual. This should resolve your issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks for your reply. The o ring seemed to be well lubricated inside the sealed package that it came in. Looked like some type of light grease. I remember cap coming into contact with the cap stop. So, I feel pretty confident that it was installed properly. With that being said, I would not argue with your statement and will be double check the under cab filter.
Today, I borrowed the local part stores code reader and P0336 code showed up. Could this code be related to my symptoms?
I might add, driving it today no problems at all, no stalling, and no pump noise. But also under no load. My problems have been while pulling an empty 24' stock trailer.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the information. I put the code into google and found info from OBD-Codes.com had the following. Seems to be really close to my symptoms, especially since my problems is intermittent stalling with no start. Any idea where this sensor is located?

"P0336 Crankshaft Position Sensor Range/Performance

This diagnostic trouble code (DTC) is a generic powertrain code. It is considered generic because it applies to all makes and models of vehicles (1996-newer), although specific repair steps may be slightly different depending on the model.

The crankshaft position sensor (CKP) is usually a two wire sensor: a signal and a ground. The CKP sensor consists of (usually) a permanent magnent sensor that is mounted in front of a reluctor (toothed) wheel mounted to the crankshaft. As the reluctor wheel passes in front of the crank sensor, an A/C signal is produced that varies according to engine speed. The PCM (powertrain control module) uses this A/C signal to interpret engine RPM. Some crank sensors are hall-effect sensors instead of permanent magnent sensors. These are three wire sensors, provided with voltage, ground, and signal. They too have a reluctor wheel with vanes and "windows" that change the voltage signal to the PCM, providing a RPM signal. I will focus on the former, since they are simpler design and more common.
The crankshaft reluctor has a specific number of teeth and the PCM can determine the position of the crankshaft using only this sensor's signature pattern. The PCM uses this sensor to also determine cylinder misfires by measuring the reluctor teeth locations in the CKP sensor signal. In conjunction with the Camshaft position sensor (CMP) the PCM can determine timing of spark and fuel injection. If the PCM senses a loss of CKP sensor signal (RPM signal) even momentarily, P0336 may set.

Symptoms of a P0336 DTC may include: Intermittent stalling & no start No start and Intermittent misfire

Potential causes of a P0336 code include: Bad crank sensor Broken reluctor ring (missing teeth, debris lodged in ring) Reluctor ring dislodged/stripped from it's stationary location Wiring harness chafing causing short Wiring open in CKP circuit

Possible Solutions:
Crankshaft sensor problems are at times intermittent and the vehicle may start and run for some time until problem occurs. Try to reproduce the complaint. When engine stalls or if the engine will not start and continue to run, then crank engine while observing RPM reading. If there is no RPM reading, check for a signal coming out of the crank sensor. Using a scope is best, but since most DIYers don't have access to one you may be able to use a code reader or the tachometer to check for RPM signal. Visually check the CKP harness for damage or cracking in the wiring insulation. Repair as necessary. Make sure the wiring isn't mis-routed near high voltage spark plug wires. Check for loose connection or broken lock at the sensor connector. Repair as necessary. Obtain a resistance spec for the Crank sensor. Remove and check it. If it doesn't pass, replace it. If it checks out okay, check the reluctor ring for damage, broken teeth, or debris lodged in the ring. Make sure the reluctor ring isn't dislodged. It should be stationary on the crankshaft. Carefully repair/replace as necessary. Note: some reluctor rings are located in the bell housing of the transmission or behind the front engine cover and cannot be easily accessed. If the vehicle intermittently stalls and after stalling you have no RPM signal and you have verified the wiring to the CKP sensor is good, then try replacing the sensor. If that doesn't take care of it, and you can't access the reluctor ring, seek help from an automotive professional."
 

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The CKP sensor is on left side at 9 O'clock at the bell housing joint. Intermittent failure is more likely a connection, or corroded connection issue but in rare cases wire wound sensors can have internal wire breaks.
 
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