The Diesel Stop banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2006 F-250 with a 6inch pro comp lift single steering stabilizer im starting to get the wobble have noticed the past couple weeks but of course its getting worse. Should I go with a dual steering stabilizer kit? if so where should i buy and what brand? also has 28.5k miles
http://imgur.com/2XeV2WN Thats my truck if needed for better look
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,125 Posts
Start with the first things first. An aftermarket stabilizer kit isn't going to stop the wobble. Steering stabilizers, which have been used in OEM applications for decades (there was a factory one on my '67 Bronco) exist to reduce steering wander on the highway. Basically some resistance to motion is being introduced in the form of a shock absorber. The real culprit is that the front end doesn't have enough positive caster to keep the wheels straight at speed. On early trucks without power steering they needed to run very little if any positive caster because the more caster the harder the wheels are to turn. With power steering this issues goes away, because you will not perceive a difference in steering effort with power assist.

On a 4WD you can't make big changes to caster, because you are typically limited to a max of about 1-1.5 degrees using an offset upper ball joint bushing. The real way to get good caster is to cut the knuckles free of the rear housing and reindex them with the ball joint centerline inclined more rearward as viewed from the end of the housing. That's a lot of work as those knuckles are completely welded on there and if you can't do it yourself you'll need to find a good shop that can handle it. The problem can get worse from lifting the truck. I'm assuming that you are running either dropped radius arm brackets, or longer radius arms. The problem is that if the drop brackets are less than the lift height you've lost caster right there. Longer arms can make the issue better, but can also carry the same drawback. The idea with longer arms is that you can lessen the angle of intersection with the frame and thus maintain caster angle, but there is a practical limit; the arms can't mount to the centerline of the rear axle for example, so longer arms may make the situation better, but may not be able to fully correct it even back to the stock geometry.

Compounding the issue is that bigger tires place higher loads on all front end parts. These trucks are notorious for wearing out ball joints (I'm on my third set). I would diagnose the suspension first and make sure that all the stock parts are up to snuff. I will bet that you find something worn out. With the front tires off the ground grab the wheels at 12 an 6 o'clock and try to move them towards you and away from you. If you get any movement the lower ball joints are shot. I'd recommend the NAPA or Moog lifetime ones because you'll never pay for the parts again, they are greaseable, and built better (all metal, no plastic).

Another test is with the tires on the ground have a friend rock the wheel back and forth (just sort of shake it side to side, you're not trying to move the tires) while you lie under the truck and look for anything moving. Track bar bushings and joints can wear out, as can tie rods, and drag link ends. If something's worn you'll see it. It will look like its dancing back and forth while everything else doesn't seem to move.

Give that stuff a try and it should fix your issue once you find the culprit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,210 Posts
I had aftermarket wheels on my truck when I bought it. started the death wobble after a bit. Took it to a mechanic and he said I needed new lug nuts. The ones on there were flat on the ends and he replaced them with lugs that had a conical end. It cured my issue. Just something to think about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,125 Posts
Lugs need to match the wheels for sure. If they are aftermarket wheels they need to use the lugs the wheels are machined for. The factory wheels use lugs with flat toothed washers and have a flat seat. Most aftermarket wheels are not going to be like that. The wheels are hub centric, meaning that the hub sets the wheel center, not the lugs, but the lugs still have to pull the wheel tight evenly. If they don't the wheel can ascribe an eliptical arc of movement and would definitely cause wobble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,920 Posts
While alignment settings are indeed very important in reducing this concern, the main cause of this steering oscillation is usually WORN suspension components that allow uncontrolled movement of the monobeam axle. The most common culprit is the track bar where old worn-out bushings (and ball joint on newer model years) allow lateral movement of the axle over bumps and when worn shocks and stabilizers can't control the movement it can create a violent oscillation. (a.k.a. Death Wobble)

I personally would start there and inspect the radius arms as well. Next, check for obvious loose components like the ball joints and steering linkages. Then check the torque on ALL of the front end fasteners including the track bar mounting brackets and the steering gear to frame bolts... which may also benefit from checking and adjusting the meshload if there is excessive play. Set the tire pressures to specification and then set the alignment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,125 Posts
And the symptoms getting progressively worse would seem to bear that out too.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top