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Discussion Starter #1
Here is my video on power steering flush procedures!

This was easy, took about 2 hours from popping to hood to slamming it closed, and that was with me filming!
Results were great! Brake stiffened up quite a bit and steering quieted a little.

Enjoy! :read:

 

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Thanks for that video, I've never bothered to change Hydro fluid before but after seeing your results, I'm going to do mine. Thanks again!!
 

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Good work. I can't get over people wearing gloves to work on their vehicles. Next will be surgeons masks and gowns. Guess calluses and greasy fingernails are a thing of the past.
 

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Good work. I can't get over people wearing gloves to work on their vehicles. Next will be surgeons masks and gowns. Guess calluses and greasy fingernails are a thing of the past.
Grease has a way of imparting a certain flavor to sourdough bread. LOL.

I am like you, no gloves as I can't feel what I'm working on. Lots of good hand cleaner and hot water do the trick.


Sent from my Autoguide iPhone app
 

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I flushed mine just like this with a helper but i used bg powersteering flush and conditioner and it did quiet the pump down and seems to help with stiff steering when not moving like parking lot manuvers. As far as the gloves, I am a tech by trade and i have made a very good career out of it, I always wear gloves, the industry has pretty much gone to this. Its different when you do this kind of work for a living vs a weekend shadetree . I have a wife and kids at home and don't want to come home and hold my kids (babys) with some nasty funky hands.
ase master
lexus master
 

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You need a little brake fluid.looks low.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Good work. I can't get over people wearing gloves to work on their vehicles. Next will be surgeons masks and gowns. Guess calluses and greasy fingernails are a thing of the past.
You wanna see the grease under my finger nails and the calluses on my hands?

I just wear gloves when using chemicals. I have read studies about long term exposure to chemicals via skin contact having an effect of long term health. It comes from being an EMT.
 

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I was an EMT a long time ago - before HIV / AIDS. We hardly ever wore gloves back then either. During my master's degree, I participated in a lot of veterinary procedures - half the vets wouldn't even wear gloves during procedures. The first time I really had to wear gloves on a regular basis was during my surgical internship. I hate not having the ability to use my fingernails. By the way - all the studies on long term motor oil exposures were done on rats. I make sure all my rats wear gloves when handling motor oil.
 

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I make sure all my rats wear gloves when handling motor oil.
Now the animal folks are going to get on you for covering your rats with plastic!

As far as the video goes - :thumbsup:. After watching it I'll be doing mine soon, but the RT way with out gloves. I agree that wearing gloves while handling chemicals is the correct thing to do, my dad was a diesel mechanic (50 years) and the waste oil and what not probably killed him, but I can't stand not seeing with my fingers, it's like reading a parts manual with a blindfold - maybe old timers...

No disrespect intended to either party, M
 

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I use gloves because when I get through working on my truck, I take the gloves off and my hands are clean. I am tired of gojo and brillo pad hard scrubbing. Makes clean up a breeze.
 

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To be honest, I usually go through about 5 or 6 pairs of gloves on a project like this. Some times I want to wear gloves, sometimes I want to use my fingers. Being an EMT makes me get used to wearing gloves. You learn to feel through the glove. But I still take them off if I am feeling down in the engine blind somewhere.
 

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Can someone clear something up for me...in the video he talks about turning the steering wheel and pumping the brakes...why do you need to pump the brakes when doing a power steering flush?
 

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If you have hydroboost instead of vacum assist then pumping the brakes will cycle the fluid in the hydroboost unit. The hydroboost system uses the P/S fluid and system.
 

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If you have hydroboost instead of vacum assist then pumping the brakes will cycle the fluid in the hydroboost unit. The hydroboost system uses the P/S fluid and system.
So I take it the power steering and brakes share the hydroboost unit?
 

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So I take it the power steering and brakes share the hydroboost unit?
Correct. The calipers are actuated by normal brake fluid, but the power brakes, think of it like brake assist, is powered by the hydroboost unit, which also works the power steering. :read:
 

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Holy man, awesome video! Perfect camera angles and great explanation. I really appreciate your videos.

And I wear the gloves too..lol. Nice to have a dinner without 40 carcinogens as a side dish :no:
 

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I just flushed mine again after 2 years since I just installed a Red Head steering gear. I use a long piece of clear tubing and a Gatorade bottle since I can hold both with one hand and walk around to the steering wheel/brake pedal while holding the bottle in one hand. Only took me about 30 mins. I used 2 quarts and now it's bright red like new. I use Mobil 1 synthetic, my pump has quieted down to where you can only hear it if you hold it against the stops.
 

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And I wear the gloves too..lol. Nice to have a dinner without 40 carcinogens as a side dish :no:
What doesn't kill you can only make you stronger! :thumbsup:
 

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Thanks for that video A/Ox4! Had seen a writeup on this, but the video persuaded me to do this sooner rather than laterm i.e., TODAY!

Prepared by calibrating a 1 1/2 gal vinegar bottle in 16 oz increments as a capture container to measure what came out so I knew what had to go back in. Was hoping to flush 6 qts. My system had not been flushed at all in 94K miles. Have owned this truck 13 yrs and it just started groaning over the last year.

All I had was a 10' length of 5/16” ID x 10' clear vinyl tubing. Got it to work by putting one end in hot water and inserted needle nose pliers to spread the opening. It slipped over the nipple easily and it gripped tightly without a clamp. I decided to flush w/o raising the front wheels off of the ground because we have soft soil out here and I didn't have anything available to support the feet of 2 jack stands. Probably should have figured a way to do it.

I usually start out with (nitrile) gloves. It is a given that at some point, they come off and stay off, but I keep trying.

This did not go as smooth for me as in the video. The video clearly warned against getting air into the system and thought replenishing the reservoir at ~4oz at a time would work. All started well with the fluid coming out dark. After what seemed like seconds of my helper turning the steering and pumping the brake, the fluid in the tube started to turn pink and foamy. The pump started groaning. Shut it down to check fluid and it was below the cold fill mark.

Replenished and tried again, replenishing at a faster rate, but was having a real hard time. Eventually the steering wheel wouldn't budge and we couldn't go any further than 2 qts. Shut it down and decided to do an online search for solutions. A good sign was that the foam seemed to dissipate in the tube and expect the same was happening in the system.

My biggest concern was possible damage to the hydroboost and/or the pump. Another diesel forum had 2 solutions: 1) keep checking the level and drive it until it purges and 2) a procedure for bleeding the system. Chose #2.

The procedure basically was to vent the filler opening by sealing it with a rubber glove with a small hole in one of the fingers to prevent getting fluid all over the place but allowing air to vent while turning the wheel lock to lock at least 25 times and maybe as much as 60 times The glove seemed unnecessary because the cap looked vented to me, but used the glove as described, anyway. Was real careful not to drop the rubber band inside to add to my problem!!!

It was nearly impossible to move the steering wheel without great force or moving the truck and it groaned fiercely. Would muscle the steering wheel while slowly moving the truck in “S” turns in forward and in reverse making sure to do full lock to lock turns. After a few turns, would shut it down and check the reservoir level. Each time the level went below the cold fill mark. Continued to replenish as necessary and repeated lock to lock turns at least 80 times. Throughout this procedure, it slowly came back to normal operation.

Shut it down several times over a few hours and let it cool, checked level and let it sit, then go back out and repeat. It kept getting easier and finally reached a point where operation was silky smooth except for a pump protest at extreme lock or hitting the brake pedal.

Overall, it finally got back to the way it should be. It has definitely improved over the pre-flush condition, but I was really concerned.

While searching for a solution to my foaming problem, it was recommended in the other forum to NEVER start this flushing process when the fluid is HOT. It should be started when the truck is COLD. Couldn't see any explanation why. Anybody have any ideas? Hope there is an answer out there for that.

Normally after such an experience, I have a recommendation or two to prevent problems I encounter. Can't say I can prevent the foaming from occurring again. However, I would at least recommend that you start with a cold truck and make sure the reservoir is at the COLD FULL level on the cap's dipstick. The trickiest part of this procedure is getting a feel for the rate to replenish the reservoir as the old fluid is being purged. I thought I was even a little ahead of the purge rate, but apparently wasn't. At one point, shut down and extracted some fluid because I got too far ahead of it.

Once air is in the system, things might get worse before you can make them better. If you can get your front wheels off of the ground, that will very likely make the flush a lot easier, especially if this is your first flush experience. You'll be better prepared to purge the system if you get air in it, too .

While things seem to better than before I started, it is unknown if there is any damage to the hydroboost or the p/s pump. I wanted to flush 6 qts to really make sure it was clean. I stopped at ~2 1/2 plus whatever I added a few ounces at a time over the next few hours. Will keep an eye on this and maybe give it another go later.

I can't fault the video. Somewhere, I got probably got behind the purge rate. If anybody has any ideas where it went wrong for me, I'm all eyes and ears.

This almost made me think twice about attempting Mark Kovalsky's ATF flush procedure. The good news is that you WANT bubbles showing up at a certain point in his procedure!
 
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