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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is the easy step-by-step instructions to set up your 05 or 06 SuperDuty to have a high idle option. This is for diesel trucks with the factory auxiliary upfitter switches. This procedure replaces the need in the older trucks to buy an AIC (Auxiliary Idle Control) module from Ford.

Refer here for pictures:

https://www.fleet.ford.com/truckbbas/non-html/2005/bb_pdf/160.pdf

Tools needed:

Ratchet with 10mm socket
wire stripper
crimper

Parts:

one butt connecter for 18ga(?) wire

How to do it:

- pull the full panel cover off. It's the big panel just below the steering wheel. The top just pulls out from the dash and then swings down to let the bottom catches come free.

- Remove the 4 bolts (10 mm heads) that hold the fuse panel in place. Pull it out and let it hang down.

- find the upfitter switch wire you want to use (see picture for location).

- find the SEIC or BCP wire you want to use (same picture).

- strip the end of each wire 1/4" and crimp the butt connect on them to connect them together.

- put the fuse panel back in place and reinstall the bolts.

- snap the fuse cover back in place.

- drink beer. (Very Important Step!)

SEIC or BCP wire?

You can hook the switch to either of these wires to achieve high idle. However, they each have slightly different behaviors. If you're doing this mod to help keep the AC cold or the heater hot, or keep the revs up when jumpstarting somebody, then you probably want to use the BCP (Battery Charge Protect) wire. If you're doing this mod to use the PTO (Power Take-Off on your tranny), then you probably want to use the SEIC (Stationary Elevated Idle Control) wire.

If you want to hook up to the BCP wire, find the purple wire with the light green stripe in the bundle just near the top of the emergency brake pedal. Note: don't be fooled into using the light green wire the the purple stripe. That's the output wire for a BCP indicator lamp.

If you want to hook up to the PTO wire, find the solid orange wire in that same bundle (near the e-brake).

Differences in behavior:

BCP
- will automatically vary RPMS from 1200 up to 2400 to maintain battery charge
- does not lock the torque converter
- has an additional wire that is an output that can be used to turn on an indicator lamp to show that BCP is active. I.e. if you want to install an LED in your dash to tell you BCP is on. Since the upfitter switch has a light on the end of this, I don't see much point in this (if you're using a factory upfitter switch).

SEIC
- does not automatically vary the RPMs. Sets idle at 1200 (unless you take advantage of the additional control wire).
- has an additional control wire that you can hook a resistor to to vary the RPMs. You could install a variable potentiometer (i.e. a knob on your dash) to let you dial in whatever RPMs you want, when SEIC is active - from 1200 to 2400 (I think that's the max).
- locks the torque converter.

Which Upfitter Wire To Use:

There is a bundle of 4 wires. They are just behind the top of the fuse panel. They're all orange, with different colored stripes. They are:

Aux-1 Circuit No 1936 wire color: Orange/Lt. Green [30amp]
Aux-2 Circuit No 1933 wire color: Orange [30amp]
Aux-3 Circuit No 1934 wire color: Orange/Yellow [10amp]
Aux-4 Circuit No 1935 wire color: Orange/Lt. Blue [10amp]
Thanks to 6Robert2 for posting this earlier

The high idle circuit needs minimal current, so you may as well use Aux-3 or Aux-4 and save the high current switches for something that needs it.

Final Notes:

By far, the hardest part of this (for me, anyway), is actually stripping the wires and crimping on the butt connector. There just ain't that much room in there to fit hands and tools in there. It would probably be a lot easier if you used a short piece of additional wire and two butt connectors, as the two stock wires don't have a lot of extra length between them to reach each other. Nevertheless, I managed to do it with just the stock wires and one butt connector, so I'm sure you can, too. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Once you have this done, to actually try it out, you have to do this:

- start the engine. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
- set the emergency brake.
- have the tranny in Park.
- do not have your foot on the foot brake.
- flip the upfitter switch to the up (On) position.

Once all the conditions are met, the idle will go right up to about 1200. If you step on the foot brake, release the e-brake, or put the truck in gear, BCP (or SEIC) will disengage and the RPMs will drop back down to 600'ish. If you undo/redo the correct conditions (i.e. take your foot back off the brake, etc.) the RPMs will go back up with a few seconds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Would a Moderator please consider pinning this topic?

I went to do this mod myself last night and I thought it was unduly difficult to find the relevant info. There are so many posts that refer to the mod without giving the details, and they frequently refer to the mod using different terms (some call it AIC, some high idle, some SEIC, etc..) that searching for it was an exercise in frustration.

Plus, there was no post that had all the info consolidated in one place. Thanks very much! to 6Robert2 for a great post on the subject. But his post is about hooking up to the SEIC (PTO) circuit which, if you actually read all of that thread, turns out to probably not be what most people want. And his post says you need an 11mm socket for the fuse panel, but I'm pretty sure the correct size is actually 10mm.

So, anyway, I wrote this because I really wished I could have found a post just like this last night and didn't. Hopefully, it will help somebody else...
 

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Stu,

I'm going to make this a sticky post for a while. ON EDIT: I guess I don't have the stroke to do this. It said it was done, but didn't actually work.

I'm also going to recommend that you put this together as an article for posting with others on the TDS Home Page. Please consider writing this up and submitting it to Dave Bey so he can post it.

Thanks for your contribution
Kevin
 

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Kevin,

I got it to take as a sticky....... /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
 

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JeepN4Life -- I do not see why not. As long as the necessary wire(s) is(are) there. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/cool.gif

Cheers from Orlando, FL! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif
Dave
 

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prevent wet stacking
prevent egr fouling
cold a/c
warm heat
charge and maintain systems with big electrical loads
run equipment at constant rate from pto tranny option
more stuff i dont know
j.schall
 

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The answer is to prevent wet stacking during extended idling. Wet stacking is unburned diesel fuel that migrates down the cylinder walls and into your oil, reducing viscosity.

There are other threads and posts that explain this in greater detail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
[ QUOTE ]
StuartV -- How is this...


[/ QUOTE ]

That's great, Dave. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Pretty much what JSchall said. I expect to use it in the following situations:

- It's really cold out and I'm sitting somewhere for an extended period, and I want to keep the heater hot. It won't get as hot with the truck idling at 600.

- It's really hot out and I'm sitting somewhere for an extended period, and I want to keep the AC cold. It won't get as cold (I don't think) with the truck idling at 600.

- I'm jumpstarting somebody else's vehicle.

- I'm parked somewhere with my trailer hooked up and I want to run the 12V lights in my trailer for an extended period.
 

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great write up
now i can stop cutting and pasting the ford upfitter pages for the seic questions
I ahve had mine hooked up since a week afte rwe got her home. the seic is a great feature.
 

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This guide had me thru it in 10 minutes and would you not know that 10 more minutes later I had to jump start a big crane truck and it worked flawlessly. Nice to be able to loose that big 'ol clunky AIC I have been riding around with for 6 years between my last two PDS's.
 

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Well I followed the instructions provided at the top of this post and it works great. I wired the Aux switch 4 to the BCP (purple with green stripe) wire and the Aux 3 to the (orange) PTO wire. I took it one step further and wired in a 10K OHM variable resistor for the pto system. Now when I turn on the 4 switch the engine goes to 1200 and so far stays there. If I turn on the 3 switch I can dial any RPM from 1200 to 2400 and it seems to stay exactly at what I set it too. I already had all the parts and the whole thing took under an hour. I also found some good info about what wires to use at this link:https://www.fleet.ford.com/truckbbas/non-html/Q108.pdf
Thanks StuartV!
 

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Just as housekeeping, I'll "unsticky" this thread now that Dave posted it as an article HERE.
 

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One thing about SEIC/AIC and high idle I found confusing at first. Are there actually two bundles of wires, one under the hood and one at the fuse box and are they both used?

Since the 06 has a built in SEIC how high will it idle when the need arises? So far on a chilly MD morning, I have seen mine go to about 900.

We have a 99 7.3 in an E350 at work, lotsa of electronics and also the need for A/C. I have found the bundle under the hood (which is labled differently) however, haven't had the time to check around the fuse box yet.

Thanks,
Rob
 
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