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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Sorry! Posted in the wrong section ... feel free to move this to "other topics"


2002 f-350 4x4 installing wheel bearing assy/hub after replacing ball joints. Went to torque the 4 nuts that hold the hub on and 2 of them just spin in place. Almost achieved the required torque when they started spinning easily. Now neither will tighten up or come off. I need to get the nuts off so I can determine if I have a bad stud in the assy. or stripped nuts. I have verified the stud is not spinning ... it is only the nut that spins. Any suggestions on how to get the nuts off in order to remove the hub again would be greatly appreciated.


My first idea was to use a puller to pull on the hub while loosening the nuts but that didn't seem to work. Difficult using a puller while attempting to remove two nuts at the same time. Especially with the confined location the nuts are in.


Good news is the other side went great with no problems at all.
 

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Can you get a screw driver or pry bar under the nut and pry on it while loosening the nut? I'm guessing there probably isn't enough room. You could try using a chisel and try breaking the nut off.


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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Strange that those nuts stripped. Did they come off hard?

There's not enough room in there for a nut splitter, but if you have a cutting torch or plasma cutter, you could burn the nuts off. Carefully cut a notch on opposite sides then crack them with a cold chisel.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the ideas. The nuts seemed pretty hard to get off but everything looked ok after cleaning up. I don't have a torch and I can't see how I could chisel them off in that space.

Do you think I could get another nut of the same size and screw it on next to the spinning nut, and then JB weld them together. After drying for 24 hrs possibly turn the new nut off with the old attached? I'm worried about jb weld running down in the nut onto the threads making things worse.
 

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That would be ok - actually no need to get the nut off since you are threaded to a stud.

If you can get the nut to NOT spin, then you can just remove the whole stud from the hub and go to Ford and get new studs and nuts.

I like the idea of threading on a new nut and JB weld the threads so it can't come off - or tack weld the existing nut on there.

In any case, you will be removing the whole stud from the assembly...
 

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Do you think I could get another nut of the same size and screw it on next to the spinning nut, and then JB weld them together. After drying for 24 hrs possibly turn the new nut off with the old attached? I'm worried about jb weld running down in the nut onto the threads making things worse.
That will not work. JB Weld has zero sheer strength. As soon as you turn the outer nut, the "weld" will sheer off before the stuck nut spins.

Do you have any welding access? Your idea would work if you put a small tack weld in place with a MIG, TIG, or even a stick welder. Where are you at? Somebody close might be able to intervene with some bigger tools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Flywheel and RT for your replies. If I did get the nut to not spin or even use a screw extractor, how hard are those studs to get out and replace? I have ordered all new studs and nuts which will be here tomorrow. But I've never replaced the studs in the assy. before and am curious how they are removed and set back in place.

RT - I'm near Lees Summit Missouri, thanks for the info on JB weld, guess I won't waste any money on that. I would love to have a welder but have never made the purchase and am not real familiar with which kind to get. Another thought I had was to use a tungsten carbide burr to cut the nut off. I think there is enough room to do that, then just take the hub back off to replace the studs ... which I have to figure out how to do.

Thanks again for the replies, would love to know what you think about cutting the nuts off with a dremel and carbide burr.
 

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A dremel and carbide burr would work, but it would take you FOREVER.

I like the idea of sticking another nut on the stud threads that are sticking out. Then weld that nut to the stud and use your socket set to back the stud out. It'll just be a little tougher than undoing the nut was in the first place. Renting a small buzz box welder would do the job on welding the nut to the stud. Pretty easy as you just need to strike your arc in the center of the nut and keep going till the hole is filled.

If you do get the hub loose and need to remove the studs, as long as the threads are in good shape, spin two nuts on, jam them together, and use the nut closest to the hub to back the stud out. Install is the opposite: Jam the nuts together and put your wrench on the nut on the end of the new stud to screw it in place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Update, broke down and had a mobile welding service come out and tack the nuts in place. $85 later I finally have those two darn nuts off. Question now is if I need to replace any of the seals or bearings on the axle or hub assembly after the welding was done on it. The seal on the hub assembly definitely has to be replaced since that was tore up when pulling the hub back off. Not sure about the big axle seal and or wheel bearings.

Thanks again for all the suggestions and help.
 

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A quick tack weld should not have generated enough heat to damage the seals inside the hub. $85 - half way to buying your own home-grade MIG welder...
 

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$85 - half way to buying your own home-grade MIG welder...
Yep, Any excuse to buy a new tool. :grin2:

Then there's the story about the company who hired a consultant to fix a problem with a machine. He comes in and looks it over, then makes a chalk mark on it and says, "There's your problem". He sends them a bill for $10,000. They object and want an itemization. He sends back a bill that says: Chalk mark -- $1, Knowing where to put the chalk mark -- $9,999.

But I'd still buy the tool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
That's why I do this stuff myself - save money and get new tools as well. I didn't go that route with the welder though because I'm getting in a time crunch and new welder would mean time researching which one and time practicing/learning how to use it.

Anyhow, I decided to pull the axle and replace the big oil seal which is so "critical" for proper operation of the auto locking hubs. I am glad I did because it was a major pain getting out and when it finally came there was obvious heat damage to it. Probably because it took the welder dude 4 attempts to get a weld that held before the stud finally came out. The first few times the weld broke and the nut started spinning again.

Just waiting now on the new studs and nuts to get here tomorrow then I should be able to put it back together. Then I'll start researching which type of welder to buy!

Have a good one guys.
Paul
 

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Then I'll start researching which type of welder to buy!

Have a good one guys.
Paul
Go register at weldingweb, it has the most participation of any welding forum out there.

That said if you want a good welder I suggest you stick with Miller or Lincoln.
 

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I love my Lincoln MIG, but TIG welders get kinda pricey. I got an AC/DC from Eastwood that works just fine. Doesn't have a 100% duty cycle, but it will do anything around the house you want to. This guy is a genius when it comes to welding. If you want to watch a few videos - Welding Tips and Tricks - TIG, MIG, Stick and a pantload of other info

A TIG takes a more practiced hand to get good welds, but once you get the hang of it, you can do just about anything with a TIG.
 

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One of the best classes that I took in High School was metal shop and that is where I learned to weld, or stick a couple pieces of metal together. Since then I have actually learned how to weld a lot better but don't do enough of it to stay where I should be. When I was building my sand buggy I really learned. I have even wanted to take a welding course from our local community college but they don't offer a welding course and I would have to drive 120 miles one way to find one. But if if you are going to do a lot of work on these trucks it is a good skill to know.

But as was mentioned if you plan on getting one I would also suggest a Lincoln or Miller. Both offer a small wire feed welder and both offer attachments if you want to add gas to it but it isn't necessary for use around the home or farm. Also if you get one you also need to get a few pieces of metal to practice on. You need to learn what to look for as far as penetration is concerned and how to weld a couple of different thickness of metal together. You Tube is a great resource to watch videos on what you are doing but nothing is going to replace a actual class or learning from a person that really knows how to weld.
 

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Eastwood had a good deal on a flux-core/mig welder a bit ago.
They aren't made in the US, but neither are the home shop grade Lincolns.
I bought a Lincoln HandyMIG welder that runs on 120V, as I don't have a 230V outlet in my garage. It's good for sheet metal using CO2, but I have my doubts on heavier material. So far it's been used for sheet metal patching. The commercial line Lincoln and Miller outfits are big $$$ (but probably worth it for serious welding.)

As far as learning to weld, here's a guy who does some awesome body metal patching. MP&C Shop Projects - The Garage Journal Board
He's got some serious welding skills.

[on edit] we should get back on topic here: Mea Culpa as well. :eek:
 

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OK - back to topic BUT get rid of your CO2 bottle and get a 75% Argon 25% CO2 mix and you'll see what your little welder can really do.
 

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OK - back to topic BUT get rid of your CO2 bottle and get a 75% Argon 25% CO2 mix and you'll see what your little welder can really do.

Right, back to topic:winking: but I agree 110%. After using 75/25 you will never go back! Not to flux core either!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Got it! Stick with a Lincoln or Miller and practice practice practice. I had a shop class in high school and we worked with metal which included some welding and cutting but that was over 25 years ago. Needless to say I'll be relearning anything I picked up in that class.
 

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There is a major difference between the Lincoln that you get at home Depot and the ones you get at a welding supply store. The plastic internals and feed wheels wear out fast with any amount of serious welding and can't take any abuse.
That said, you can get Hobart at tractor supply which is the home owner version of miller and can find a decent mid grade for less than a 'real' welder.
If just looking for cheap that'll get the job done, the higher end harbor freight welders work well for being cheap machines. Just be prepared to wait on the duty cycle.
I also recommend switching to the argon mix.
Of course my welding setup is a miller trailblazer with a suitcase mig... I don't have duty cycle issues nor penetration issues...
 
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