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Hi all, I've thought all along that the dpf system is a sacrifice we should make to keep the environment from imploding. (Yes, that was a simple statement for a big picture). There's been all sorts of bullet items to my point of view - e.g. "rolling coal", the macho factor, global warming, anti-authority against "the man", etc...

However, my good friend recently had an exhaust system failure on his Dodge diesel due to a dpf fluid pump failure. The replacement pump is over priced at about $600. But the crux is that a replacement won't be available for several months due to whatever reason (Covid?). Or, buy a used one from a scalper on Ebay for a couple of thousand.

So, he deleted his dpf exhaust and installed the tunes and hardware from a company in Canada. His newly deleted truck now has gobs more power and gets from 3-5 mpg better. It only blows soot if he really stomps on it in performance mode. And he usually keeps it in economy mode and is not interested in being the ******* "rolling coal."

If the Feds want us to refrain from modifying our trucks then there needs to be a reasonable failure mode that does not relegate our trucks dead on the side of the road.
 

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If the Feds want us to refrain from modifying our trucks then there needs to be a reasonable failure mode that does not relegate our trucks dead on the side of the road.
The irony is that the federally mandated failure modes are mostly what drives many people modify their trucks.
 

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I persdonally like the DEF equipment on my truck. I like it that i cant smell the ULSD because quite frankly id doesn't smell like the good stuff. I have had issues with my DEF nozzle and DEF heater. I now carry a new DEF nozzle in the truck. It would appear that DEF gets crystalized on the nozzle and sets a light. Ridiculous to say the least. I will contimue to keep this stuff on my truck . As for the tune I am not sure anyone who deletes there truck gets a increase in fuel millage. Our truck mostly goes 500 miles before a regen and depending how you drive your truck it's around that point. It's not very cost effective to delete your truck in the first place. More CEL's are set with deleted trucks and once you tune the truck it's mostly the tune that causes the issue.
 

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^^^
That is what I DON'T like about my deleted 2012. It stinks. At times I get a whiff of it in the cab while on the road. I am actually considering getting rid of my 2012 to get a new 2022, and the one thing I won't even consider anymore is deleting it, not after this one.
 
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I like the results of the emissions system, but the big thing I don't like about them is that they can turn the truck into a very expensive brick if anything fails. The exhaust coming out of the tailpipe of my truck smells nothing like traditional diesel exhaust (not that I mind that smell), but the cleanliness of it is nice. The EPA mandated failure modes are highly inconvenient and overly restrictive. My truck should not be relegated to "idle only" or severely reduced power just because something is wrong in the emissions system. That can become very dangerous quite quickly if you are towing on a highway and the truck can't even make enough power to move itself - much less a heavy load - out of the way of other traffic. Sure - it may give you 150 miles or 500 miles before power gets reduced, but that can become problematic as well. The cost of the components is no help either. Last time I looked, a DPF was pushing $4,000 and some of the emissions components, like so many other things these days, are backordered or unavailable. Not very convenient especially if you count on the truck for a business.

I think the worst smell of the emissions equipment is the DPF regen. I don't care for that burning rubber smell when it happens.
 

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I like the results of the emissions system, but the big thing I don't like about them is that they can turn the truck into a very expensive brick if anything fails. The exhaust coming out of the tailpipe of my truck smells nothing like traditional diesel exhaust (not that I mind that smell), but the cleanliness of it is nice. The EPA mandated failure modes are highly inconvenient and overly restrictive. My truck should not be relegated to "idle only" or severely reduced power just because something is wrong in the emissions system. That can become very dangerous quite quickly if you are towing on a highway and the truck can't even make enough power to move itself - much less a heavy load - out of the way of other traffic. Sure - it may give you 150 miles or 500 miles before power gets reduced, but that can become problematic as well. The cost of the components is no help either. Last time I looked, a DPF was pushing $4,000 and some of the emissions components, like so many other things these days, are backordered or unavailable. Not very convenient especially if you count on the truck for a business.

I think the worst smell of the emissions equipment is the DPF regen. I don't care for that burning rubber smell when it happens.
I agree with you this stuff is expensive. However this back order crap just started for the most part because we locked down the country for 2 weeks which turned into months because the governors decided the found emergency powers to keep states locked down much longer. Just look at Michigan. Its still not moving like before. it will come back but not Canada is protesting the lock downs there.I highly support them.I personally have had enough of covid.
As for these emissions stuff I like how my truck doesn't smoke. It doesn't stink and i get decent fuel millage for such a big truck. I tow with mine and I get around 11. some guys are all over fuel millage but then they put 37's and a 6" lift and wonder why they don't get good fuel millage. LOL
As for that burning smell it should go away or I would take it to a dealer because mine doesn't stink like that.
 

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I have my doubts that deleting gets better MPG. Mine averages 16.5 and 11 towing. Thats right on par with a factory full truck. Sure you save a bit on DEF and your intake doesn't turn into a cave full of oily carbon, but other than a bit more power, I don't see any benefit of deleting. One could argue, but if something breaks, and I can counter with, but if the PCM fails. If you can't retrieve your tune and unmarry the tuner, you are screwed. Wasn't that big a deal when tuners didn't have the EPA breathing down their necks so they could fix it, but I can't even get a tuner to look at my tune to see if they can tweak the fuel management so it didn't smoke so much.
 
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I know very little about the new diesels. I never get diesel smell in the cab of my 2002. The only time the truck has a smell is on a very cold morning. Smells are something that we all perceive differently. But, do the new ones stink more?
 

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I know very little about the new diesels. I never get diesel smell in the cab of my 2002. The only time the truck has a smell is on a very cold morning. Smells are something that we all perceive differently. But, do the new ones stink more?
The new diesels smell nothing like the old ones. To me they smell nothing like traditional diesel exhaust - almost a sweet smell. No particulates in the exhaust means the exhaust will smell a lot different.
 

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You can't smell my 15. Hell you can have a conversation standing nest to my truck running. Is it a pain to own a diesel? Not really it does however reguire a few more things you have to think about like not putting gas in it. I have the DEF nozzle from Ford that snaps into the DEF tank. It keeps me from overfilling my truck and keeps that from spilling it down the side of my truck. These new trucks are headache proof and getting better.
 

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I know very little about the new diesels. I never get diesel smell in the cab of my 2002. The only time the truck has a smell is on a very cold morning. Smells are something that we all perceive differently. But, do the new ones stink more?
A Deleted one stinks. It's raw diesel exhaust coming out the tail pipe and the low sulpher diesel does not smell like the old diesel, a bit harsher in smell. What comes out the pipe on a stock has run through different filters which removes the harsh smells.
 
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A properly running diesel doesn’t stink deleted. Burning oil or an injector going out is what makes them stink. I love deleted trucks but don’t delete mine cause I’m a warranty dude. Keep trucks for 150k then trad them off every 3 years. Now I habe a 97 250 you hint want to be behind. It’ll choke you but it’s got some bad injectors.
 

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It stinks, just like my 99 did because the exhaust is untreated, smells like diesel exhaust. DPF/DEF exhaust has little to no smell to it. Thats what I mean by it stinks. I have a B2410 Kubota and a new L4060 Kubta, both are diesel, the B2410 being 20 years old, I can smell the diesel exhaust, the new one with a DPF has no smell. My deleted 2012, it has that old truck aroma to it, and it lingers, just like my 99 did, but the ULSD is worse than the previous stuff. I used to like the smell of diesel exhaust.
 
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I would not doubt your friends MPG increase. It takes extra fuel to perform a regen. Basically, whatever fuel that is required to get it to 'X' temperature to burn off the soot. That is all tuned out when the truck is put on a diet. I know somebody who is contemplaing doing the same thing as your friend. This is after being stuck on a 2 lane bridge over a river due to a failed exhaust sensor. It's understandable. You spend upwards of a 100k on a truck that you want to work. Now you have to burn extra fuel to clean a DPF that is monitored by several exhaust sensors, each one capable of stranding you anyplace at anytime. Follow that by need to have a trouble prone piss injection system in your exhaust, for the life of the truck. Combining those factors makes putting one on a diet a easy decision in my opinion. Just be aware that the Feds are cracking down on dieted diesels.
 

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....gets from 3-5 mpg better....
I don't believe that for a minute unless there was something else wrong. But then again, lots of people like to lie about their mileage, so it's a frequently debated subject.

All my friends that deleted their trucks picked up maybe 1 MPG (some said mileage was no different), which won't even pay for the cost to delete in 100,000 miles unless you're towing constantly.

I don't like the smell of deleted trucks. My 2022 is staying stock.
 
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