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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's about 25F where I am located. Obviously it was a bit colder than that last night. I added PS Winterizer yesterday evening and then proceeded to drive my truck for the rest of the night until I got home. About an hour. Plugged truck in last night. Just went to start it, started perfect, idled fine... I set my heat and walked away from my truck towards my house. Just as I get to the door, she dies. And it died quick and hard. Same as if you shut her off with the key. Now she won't start, slighlty wants to but won't.
 

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Filling the filter won't help anything from the engine to the tanks, including the tanks. Two winters ago during a severe cold spell there was an out of town box truck along side the highway a mile east of town with tarps all around the lower edge of the body to the ground, front to back, a portable generator, and a couple big blower shop type heaters blasting away. They finally got it thawed out the 3rd day.
Both my tanks are totally full with non-winterized fuel I bought when the price dropped. I added PS at the time to the tanks, but I don't use it for a daily driver anymore. I need to hook it up to my flatbed and get a couple pallets of stove pellets but fortunately I can wait until a 40 degree afternoon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Haha I need my truck. Bad. So what the hell do I do? First diesel if you can't tell. I guess I'll throw 911 in the tanks and try it?
 

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Do you have access to compressed air? If so then blow your fuel lines out, and then let them fill with treated fuel. A little heet in the fuel tank just in case you have ice might not be a bad idea. As long as you don't use too much methanol it won't hurt anything. Just remember a little goes a long way, I wouldn't use more than a bottle in a tank full.
 

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"It's about 25F where I am located. Obviously it was a bit colder than that last night."

You never said where you live. The last week we reached or almost reached 25° for a high, but when I looked at the indoor/outdoor thermometer at dawn it was always 1° to 4°.
 

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Um, how have you determined that the fuel is gelled, or that the no-start is fuel-related at all? How much fuel is in the tank you're using? Have you tried the other tank?
 

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Since you didn't post or put in your profile your location, it's hard to tell if you really have a gell problem. Most locations have already changed to winter blend fuel, at 25*F, the fuel shouldn't have gelled. Pull the filter and see if it looks like lard, if the fuel won't pour out, then it's gelled.
 

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It is always interesting in that when a truck doesn't start when it gets cold that the first thing that a lot of owners suspect is gelled fuel.

In the 19 years that I have owned my truck and in the 40 years that I have been driving diesels I have only seen gelled fuel one time and that was over 30 years ago.

I'm not saying that it doesn't happen because it does but the majority of diesel owners don't even know how to check for it but they blame it when their truck doesn't start or dies going down the road.
 

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Yesterday I went out about 11AM to fill my stock tank and bring in some more stove pellets, it was 21degrees. Just to see, I went over and tried to start my pickup. It fired up within 2 seconds. It had been about 4 above a few hours before, so no doubt my fuel system was still way below the 21 degrees. I've got no idea if it started due to the Power Service I'd put in when filling up or if the temp wasn't cold enough to jell the summer fuel. It would be interesting to know from someone who actually knows what they're talking about (like a fuel distributor) at what temp non-winterized fuel jells.
 

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Changing temps. cause condensation. Partially full tanks will sweat on the inside. When the weather turns cold, that condensation turns to ice, causing the fuel lines and filters to plug up. This is mostly, in my experience what causes people to think their fuel is jelled.
I ran across jelled fuel once. It was below 0*, and I had been traveling for some time before it stopped. With the wind chill running under the truck I was driving, I have no idea how cold it really was. I never saw it on any of the stationary engines I worked on, and temps. were just as cold as the day it jelled while I was traveling down the highway. The fuel had a bright green color to it, and looked like jello. You literally could spoon it up. I'm sure glad I had a service truck. A couple of hours with an air compressor, a new filter and I was able to limp it to where I could get some fuel treatment. The fuel in the tank didn't completely jell, just in the lines and of course the filter.
 

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Some very informative experiences on here.

Since the OP had added Power Service and been driving the truck through the night and it only sat for a few hours it doesn't sound like its a gelling issue. What was just mentioned about water in the tank and fuel lines could be an issue I guess.

Hopefully he will check back in with news.

The one thing about windchill is that it does not affect machinery...only living tissue.

If its 0 degrees outside and 100 mph wind then the equipment is still 0 degrees. The object cannot get colder than the air temperature. Wind can affect machinery only in that any heat that an engine creates is quickly dissipated because the wind carries it off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Well that's basically what I was asking. I didn't know if my fuel was gelling or not, I was more or less looking for info on how to tell if it was. I try not to jump to conclusions. I figured out what it was though. So I've had the truck for about 3 months. It leaks oil like a champ. Called the previous owner and of course, on the last oil change he put 3qts of Lucas stop leak in it. So I'm pretty sure it's because my oils too thick. Time for an oil change, I'd rather have it leak for now until I replace the seals, than it to not start.
 

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Change your oil as soon as possible. That Lucas Stop Leak is nothing more than Lucas Oil Stabilizer with a chemical in it to swell the seals. Your gonna have to replace the front and rear seals more than likely. If you don't keep using it ever oil change, the seals will leak worse than ever.
Here is an excerpt from using Lucas.

READ
Yes, but what about Lucas Oil Stabilizer?

Isn't it used extensively in drag racing? Yes it is, and it's a unique category in oil additives with a milder version of deception. With high-alcohol fuels and high horsepower, there is a huge problem with the engine oil becoming rapidly diluted (thinned out) by the alcohol. To combat this problem, drag racers commonly use a very heavy racing oil (like 60 weight), then add Lucas to the oil because it increases the viscosity even more. That way, as the oil is being rapidly diluted going down the dragstrip, when they back off the throttle it might be a 30 or 40 weight oil instead of a 10 or 20 weight oil that would allow a lot of engine damage.



Now, what does ANY of that have to do with your vehicle? NOTHING ! Adding their product to your oil will increase the weight (viscosity) of your engine oil, which will decrease your fuel economy and increase your oil pressure. Increasing the oil pressure beyond the 30 or 40 weight that the engine's designed for doesn't help you. In fact, it's a negative because it adds load to your starter and battery, especially in cold weather, and it makes your engine wear faster. That's right - your engine wears faster for two main reasons: because during cold starts it takes longer to get the oil to all the components, and the higher oil pressure drop across your oil filter means that more of the oil will bypass the filter than normally occurs while your engine is warming up during driving. So you're pumping additional wear particles through the engine rather than filtering them out.

Lucas makes a lot of money with there Witches Brew, ya just gotta know why you would use any of it for whatever.
 

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Well its decent that he told you he added so much Lucas but it sure seems like a deceptive practice to do right before selling a vehicle.

Maybe replace with a semi-synthetic 10w-30 that is rated for diesel engines. The 10w should be enough for cold temps.

If you opt for a full synthetic 5w-40 then its probably going to leak out even faster.
 

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If it is leaking oil so bad that the previous owner put stop leak into the oil I would just run plain old dino oil until you get the leaks taken care of.

A friends truck leaked oil so fast that all he did was change the filter for 2 years. The oil never stayed in the engine long enough to get dirty.
 

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If it is leaking oil so bad that the previous owner put stop leak into the oil I would just run plain old dino oil until you get the leaks taken care of.

A friends truck leaked oil so fast that all he did was change the filter for 2 years. The oil never stayed in the engine long enough to get dirty.
Bugman,

I understand what you are saying but there are still advantages to a semi-synthetic such as availability in a 10W instead of Dino that only comes in 15W. You get the flow characteristics that the OP really needs right now to keep his truck running in winter temps.

If it were summer, then save a couple bucks with a Dino.

Also, try to find a cheaper price on a Diesel Dino oil than the T5 Semi-Synth from Home Depot for $16/gallon.
 
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