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Hi all,

I'm looking for suggestions on the best tailgate ramps on the market. I did some searching the other day, and here are 2 I found:


leonardaccessories.com/product/cargo-management-ramps-sherrer-steel-tailgate-ramp


leonardaccessories.com/product/cargo-management-ramps-sherrer-aluminum-tailgate-ramp



Any thoughts?



Also, how can a tailgate ramp be locked down to prevent theft?

Let me know, thanks.
 

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Wasn’t able to open link, but I have the ramps that are welded aluminum square tubing with cross bars that let you adjust to different widths, while keeping both ramps connected. Very solid-when driving my AC 500 into truck bed.

As for theft deterrent I run steel cable through ramps, through hold down bracket on bed, and then padlock
 

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"Best" is subjective. What's best for me may not be best for you. What's best for you today may not be best for you tomorrow. If you want recommendations, you have to tell us exactly what you'll be doing with them, and what your limitations are.

Some ramps are very lightweight (if you have trouble lifting heavy objects); some can handle very heavy machines (but the ramps themselves are very heavy); some are collapsible (so they can be stowed in smaller compartments); some are flat & thin (so they can be stored in the bed under the loaded vehicle); some are wide (for loads with varying wheel track widths); some are inverted (to keep motorcycle wheels on); some are nearly automatic (but they ride in the hitch receiver & hang out & down behind the truck while driving); some are cheap - some are expensive...

What's best for you?
 

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Here is what I believe that he is looking at. It isn't a ramp as most of us would think but a tailgate that turns into a ramp.

https://www.leonardaccessories.com/product/cargo-management-ramps-sherrer-aluminum-tailgate-ramp

I like the idea. It gets rid of the weak link of using a ramp to load a ATV or other wheeled vehicle. The tailgates on the Super Duty trucks is very week and have been known to collapse when running a machine up onto it using the ramps that fold up and store in the back of the truck.
 

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Interesting, but I notice the zero-turn is dragging the bed because the breakover angle is so high. That's another consideration on what's "best" for each person. Some ramps are straight, and some are arched to reduce breakover.

But at that price, I'd just buy a NICE trailer.

...or a used LiftGate.

...or just buy a 2nd mower to keep wherever I wanted to haul one.
 

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Wasn’t able to open link, but I have the ramps that are welded aluminum square tubing with cross bars that let you adjust to different widths, while keeping both ramps connected. Very solid-when driving my AC 500 into truck bed.As for theft deterrent I run steel cable through ramps, through hold down bracket on bed, and then padlock
Big Horn, mine are like yours and I like them real well with the exception that I can't adjust for widths like you can. So far what few things I've hauled other than my 4 wheeler the width was fine. And unless I haul my Polaris in my horse trailer, I lock my ramps to the U-bolt for safety chains next to the gooseneck ball. Got a coiled cable bicycle combination lock which is easy to store.
 

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The tailgates on the Super Duty trucks is very week and have been known to collapse when running a machine up onto it using the ramps that fold up and store in the back of the truck.
Bugman, you just improved my mood with that tidbit of info. When the new full sized 1/2 ton Tundras came out I bought one for a daily driver. Love the truck, but guys on the Tundra forum said they all were cracking the corner tailgate welds when loading 4 wheelers so every time I hauled my ATV it was in the bed of the old Ford diesel and I couldn't use my new truck like everyone else running around town with a ATV in the bed. I permanently leave the tailgate off my Ford anyway so it's not an issue. Didn't have a clue the Fords had a tailgate issue too.
 

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Here is what I believe that he is looking at. It isn't a ramp as most of us would think but a tailgate that turns into a ramp.

https://www.leonardaccessories.com/product/cargo-management-ramps-sherrer-aluminum-tailgate-ramp

I like the idea. It gets rid of the weak link of using a ramp to load a ATV or other wheeled vehicle. The tailgates on the Super Duty trucks is very week and have been known to collapse when running a machine up onto it using the ramps that fold up and store in the back of the truck.
I wonder how adding a 1/8” aluminum tread plate (riveted) to the inside as a stiffener would work—I noticed when walking on my tailgate it had a lot of flex.
 

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Bugman, you just improved my mood with that tidbit of info. When the new full sized 1/2 ton Tundras came out I bought one for a daily driver. Love the truck, but guys on the Tundra forum said they all were cracking the corner tailgate welds when loading 4 wheelers so every time I hauled my ATV it was in the bed of the old Ford diesel and I couldn't use my new truck like everyone else running around town with a ATV in the bed. I permanently leave the tailgate off my Ford anyway so it's not an issue. Didn't have a clue the Fords had a tailgate issue too.
I have heard that the issue is on the newer trucks and not the ones that we have that have a little bit more metal in them.

I had no problems loading my ATV into my 84 using some ramps that I made myself or even my 96 using the same ramps that sat on the tailgate. But I have heard of owners using ramps sitting on the tailgate of the newer trucks and once the ATV's weight is on the tailgate itself that the tailgate is collapsing. Now after saying that I have a friend in Arizona that has a 2008 F350 and he has had no problems, but you never know what is going to happen.
 

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Actually I did that on my Tundra, not for strength, but it's painted light beige so I can sit on it when I'm putting on flyfishing waders, etc and not get fried from the dark truck color hot sheet metal. Makes a good work bench at home too. That combination tailgate/ramp wouldn't work for me, too slick during icy, snowy weather. A guy in a nearby town got killed loading his ATV a few years back. We all figured he didn't chain both sides of his ramp to bed rope hooks and got the front wheels on the tailgate, then goosed it, the ramp kicked off the tailgate and the back of the machine hit the ground then it went over on top of him.

And as you said, must be just the newer trucks. I see guys running all around, Dodges, Chevys, and Fords with the back wheels of the 4 wheelers resting on the tailgates due to their behind the cab toolboxes.
And I don't see how guys have the huevos to load snowmachines or ATV's sideways on top of the bed edges.
 

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I have also learned that whenever I am loading my ATV that I lock in into 4 wheel drive. It doesn't matter if I am using the ramps sitting on the tailgate or if I am loading it up the ramps that sit up on top of the bed of the truck. It just give you so much more control going up them and when the front wheels hit the bed and the rear are still on the ramps and you goose it the front wheels will pull you in instead of the rear shooting the ramps out from under you.
 

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I have also learned that whenever I am loading my ATV that I lock in into 4 wheel drive. It doesn't matter if I am using the ramps sitting on the tailgate or if I am loading it up the ramps that sit up on top of the bed of the truck. It just give you so much more control going up them and when the front wheels hit the bed and the rear are still on the ramps and you goose it the front wheels will pull you in instead of the rear shooting the ramps out from under you.
2nd that!
 

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Some ramps have a safety cable to clip onto a bed tiedown to keep the ramp from sliding back off the t/g or bed.
 

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2nd that!
Yep, I always make sure mine's in 4WD. So Bugman, you're one of those gutsy guys who loads yours sideways on top of the bed? I asked a local guy how he does it, he said it's easy because his ramps are 10' long. I'd want'em to be maybe 30'. :laugh2:
 

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Some ramps have a safety cable to clip onto a bed tiedown to keep the ramp from sliding back off the t/g or bed.
.

About 5th rung from ground, My straps go to underneath of bumper, cinch down tight/ quick release buckle
 

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My ramps are 11' long and at times depending on where I am loading it up at it can get interesting. But it isn't bad as long as you keep moving. If you stop mid way up or just as you start onto the rack up on the bed rails it can raise your pucker factor.

I have some pictures somewhere of my ATV sitting up on top I'll have to find.
 

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Here are a few pictures of it. The first couple where it is nice and dry are of my hunting partners 2008 F350, my truck is the one in the snow.





 

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Thanks for the pics. And of course loading most anything in the snow makes the day more interesting. :) After the really bad winter before last, we bought a skid steer and it has to be backed onto my rather high decked gooseneck flatbed. Since you can't see anything behind you and not much more close in on the sides, it somewhat puts the fear of God in you.
 

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Thanks for the pics. And of course loading most anything in the snow makes the day more interesting. :) After the really bad winter before last, we bought a skid steer and it has to be backed onto my rather high decked gooseneck flatbed. Since you can't see anything behind you and not much more close in on the sides, it somewhat puts the fear of God in you.
Here is another picture of the ramp construction.

I hear you on loading equipment onto a metal deck trailer or using solid metal ramps. When I was on a line crew with the phone company we had all kinds of fun at times trying to get a crawler or backhoe up onto the trailer when it had been snowing or really wet. We actually talked the boss into putting some expanded metal on the ramps to help with traction, but once the holes got filled in with mud it was back to the slippery slide. But at least when we were traveling the fold up ramps would bounce enough to get the dirt off of them.

 
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