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I need to get my rear brake rotors ordered (L&R) for the 2002 F350 Superduty DRW. It’s 4wd but I believe the fronts are OK. I noticed the rear were scored when I was checking the brake pads this past Fall.

Motorcraft are about $77.00 each. There are a lot of aftermarket rotors, drilled, slotted, etc. Is there any real braking improvement with these or should I just trust the Motorcraft original part? My brakes seem good other than what I can see with the scoring.

While I have the truck down, I’ll check the lines, hoses, calipers, and will flush/change the brake fluid. I’m almost inclined to change all the rubber brake hoses, on all four calipers and (I’m assuming one on each differential) as I believe they’re original (17 years old).

Thanks!
 

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I used Motorcraft rear rotors on my truck when I did the rear brakes. Also replaced the hoses at the calipers and the one dropping down from the frame to the rear axle. I would recommend replacing hoses if you're going to be there.
There's a lot of hype about drilled and/or slotted rotors, but the fact is that you lose braking area with them. I think you'd be fine with stock rotors. Also, unless the scoring is real bad, there's not a huge need to replace them, as the pads will seat to fit them in short order.


Moving your thread to Wheels, Tires, Brakes, & Suspension.
 

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Man this is going to hurt, but, I am going to have to disagree with Klhansen. I put a set of the Cryo/slotted rotors and upgraded pads on the front of a F350 and I did notice a difference. Having said that I only did it once and would not use them on the rear because the stock brakes work great even when towing at or above CGVWR. I would also pull the rear rotor and check the E-brake and axle seal. That will give you a good chance to snowball this into a bigger project.:brickwall:
DENNY
 

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Man this is going to hurt, but, I am going to have to disagree with Klhansen.
LOL, Denny. Don't worry, I won't mod-smack you for disagreeing with me. :lol:

I was just passing along what I learned from FMTRVT's posts. :bowdown: Jack has probably handled more rotors and tested more brake setups than anyone on the site. I've only got experience with one or two trucks as far as brakes go.


BTW, I forgot to say thanks for the shop space yesterday. :eek: The engine is spinning over like it's supposed to now with the new starter. :bouncy: Hope you got your project done on the Beemer.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
DENNY; I would also pull the rear rotor and check the E-brake and axle seal. That will give you a good chance to snowball this into a bigger project.[IMG class=inlineimg said:
https://www.thedieselstop.com/forums/images/smilies/brickwall.gif[/IMG]
DENNY
It’s turning into a full blown avalanche! ?
Starting February
Pull bed
Replace support channels
Install load lifter 5000 air bags
Wire wheel & paint frame / differential
Do Hutch Mod
Replace shocks front/back
Replace rear rotors (e-brakes/seals)
Replace all brake hoses/pads/flush fluid
Rebuild 4 wd hubs
Change differentials A/T fluid & gear oil
Check steel brake lines

(Good thing shop (upstairs) has a refrigerator/beer, recliners, Hide a bed couch, tv, pool table, already disconnected the phone, and (note to self- tell wife no honey do jobs, do not disturb, and don’t poke the bear!- I’ll be in the barn) ?
 

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Motorcraft rotors will perform for you just fine. I see you live in the rust belt. The snowball effect is a big factor with rear brakes on the 2002 trucks as rust can make removing the rear rotors difficult if a decent rust ridge has formed on the brake drum. More importantly, inspect the backing plates for rust as they tend to rot through at the parking brake shoe hold down holes. At that point you are usually replacing everything for the most part.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the replies
 

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I would say get rid of the axle blocks but you already have new shocks. Sounds like you are going to have a great tow rig!!
DENNY
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
I would say get rid of the axle blocks but you already have new shocks. Sounds like you are going to have a great tow rig!!
DENNY
Denny, can you explain in a little more detail any advantage of getting rid of the axle blocks. I’m still looking at shocks to purchase (getting all my parts together) and have been looking seriously at the RS9000’s

From what I understand my F350 sits high in the rear so that when a load is carried (T/C) or hitched the truck will sit level and not sag, w/ headlights pointed high.

Almost everyone I’ve spoken with says airbags are the way to go. On my load lifter 5000’s the installation instruction say to measure the distance between wheel well arch and top of tire as a reference of normal ride height—so that when truck is raised on jack stands I can get the air bag brackets in the right place. I am assuming when they say normal ride height, that is the unloaded, rear of truck sitting high ?

I did see on another site, poster said he removed axle blocks, (which I hadn’t heard about until you mentioned it) which lowered his tailgate 5” and made loading his truck much easier. Actually, the way my truck sits now (high) is very comfortable for me, a good height and easy to load/unload.

I would like to hear your opinion on it more with more details—thanks, Glenn
 

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I was the guy in the other post. The main reason I lowered my last 3 F350 trucks was to make it easy to load items and for side rail clearance on the 5th wheel. I use my truck to haul stuff sometimes and I am old so loading and unloading is a lot easier. The first two trucks I put F250 blocks in, the last one a F350 DRW I got rid of the blocks completely, F250 shocks and sway bar ends on all 3. When the F350 super duty first came out Ford had a service bulletin that advised the block removal for owners that had side rail problem with 5th wheels. Some had issues with the driveline issue so they went to the F250 block in a latter service bulletin. With the air bags you can adjust the pressure so the truck does not have any sag no mater what the load. I have had no driveline issues even at max GRWR. The other advantage is now the entire load is lower which is better from a sway standpoint. The new 5th wheels seem to sit higher so it may not be a problem for you. My headlights are always at the perfect angle not mater what the load, this is the benefit of the airbags with or without changing blocks.
DENNY
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you!
 

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When I did my airbags I use the inflation valves to replace the top two bolts of the license plate. Easy access for adding removing air.
DENNY
 

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Discussion Starter #13
When I did my airbags I use the inflation valves to replace the top two bolts of the license plate. Easy access for adding removing air.
DENNY
Good idea, I like that—especially since I’m leaving the two bags separate
 

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There's actually two pre-drilled holes in the lower panel below the tailgate that the valves fit into. That's where I have my inflation valves, but I may move them to the license plate as Denny suggests, because the current location is a bit awkward to access.
 
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