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Heyy im new to the 7.3 and I was moving the truck when I noticed this leak i dont know what it is though, someone help plz its a sort of pinkish liquid
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If it is pink odds are that it is transmission fluid.

You need to clean it up as good as possible and then watch it to see if you can see where it is coming from
 

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Transmission cooler lines - poorly repaired and should not be hanging down that far. Once upon a time when completing transmission repairs/replacement and flushing it was required to install an in-line filter which required cutting one line. Since this is both cooler lines I might guess that someone replaced the lines and cut them or replaced only half - people do strange things. It is acceptable to use hose like that but I would trim the lines to allow them to be properly positioned and secured using compression fittings with hose fittings and install new pieces of hose with new clamps.
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If the lines meet up after removing the hoses then a straight compression joint would be most secure and least likely to leak if installed correctly.
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Or you could replace the lines entirely...the truck in the picture does not look like rust is an issue so I am a little perplexed as to why this is like that.
 

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What about just getting the lines in the proper position & replacing the hose (if needed) and adding TWO hydraulic clamps on EACH end to ASSURE a firm, leak proof connection vs. single worm clamps? By hydraulic clamp I mean what may be properly called a "nut & bolt clamp. Just seems like it would be easier (to me). That don't make it the (best), just easier & less $.
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The trick to using hose and clamps is to take a double flare tool and put on stage one of the double flare, putting a bubble at the end of the line. Then put the hose on and tighten the clamps behind the bubble. Like the middle of the photo below.
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pretty good video on how to use a standard double flaring tool to make a bubble flare......notice the bar is turned over to use the arbor on the “flat side”

 

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Looks to me likme those hoses are a little old and need to be replaced. Like Ford Dr. said get the barbed fittings and you will be able to easily be able to replace the hoses when they wear out again. That would be way easier than putting a double flair on those lines.
 

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Looks to me like those hoses are a little old and need to be replaced. Like Ford Dr. said get the barbed fittings and you will be able to easily be able to replace the hoses when they wear out again. That would be way easier than putting a double flair on those lines.
I have used the flare method of creating a barb of sorts - helps prevent the hose from sliding off however it does little to prevent leaks beace the hose is sometimes VERY difficult to get past the flare. In my experience it seems that any use of a hose and a clamp will eventually lead to a leak. The barbed fittings are made for use with a hose yet a leak is still probable as the hose usually degrades and clamping becomes loose... or someone over tightens the clamps and damages them and the rubber hose. This is why I prefer replacing the line or using a flare connection if possible. Again, we do not know why the cooler lines were cut in the first place.
 

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Looks like he changed to the correct hose but still has worm clamps , no stage 1 flare & no compression / barbed fittings. Guess he will have leaking hose shortly.
I'm aware what ford_doctor suggested is the "best" way to do it. I was just (suggesting) the likely least expensive, easiest & probably just as likely not to leak way to do it. Remember I am suggesting TWO clamps on each side. That's a total of FOUR (not worm type) clamps. Still very easy to R&R either the line or an in-line filter (if installed) in the future. I would (guess) these are SOLID LINES from OEM because they are in a location subject to road rash, rocks... Otherwise , a rubber transmission (SAE J1019) line would likely last just as long as the steel. So again, as ford_doctor suggests, he would r&r the line as OEM as the (best solution). It's not the ONLY solution. You could start just replacing the hose. Then when you have time get a couple extra & better clamps. Then if you still cant sleep at night (at your convenience), shop around for the compression / barbed fittings OR new OEM lines.
Anyway, now you have options! LOL DDT
 

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I was just (suggesting) the likely least expensive, easiest & probably just as likely not to leak way to do it.
Not a bad suggestion at all.
 

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Thanks ford_doctor, I absolutely respect all your advice & opinions!
I know for myself when I have a problem like that one, and I think I have an (easy) plan of action, I would get (concerned) when I hear that maybe what I was going to do was (wrong). Especially if it were something I had little experience in/of. So that's why I threw the (suggestions) out there for the OP. He said he was "new" and didn't seem to know anything about this leak or the purpose of those lines.
If he (the OP) is still looking at this thread, It might be of interest to him to know that if these vehicles are brought to a dealer for transmission service, the dealer has a TBS to install an in - line filter. That photo does NOT look like what a dealer would have done (BUT WHO KNOWS). Maybe the PO cut the wrong line. Then cut the right line. Then later removed the in-line filter. That or a Tasmanian Devil was let loose under the chassis with a cutting tool! 😈 🔧 🛠 🗡 🔨 ✂!!! LOL.
So the OP (might) want to install the in-line filter as part of the repair. It's certainly not necessary & again, can be done at a later date very easily since the lines have already been cut. The filter goes on the RETURN LINE (correct me if I am wrong) which is identified as the line going to the REAR MOST position on the transmission (correct me if I am wrong). The proper filter is made by Magnefine (I can't find the # right now). Just started looking at some information & read something about the (newer) vehicles supposedly not needing the external filter because of some redesign aspect of the system. (didn't catch what year the OP said he had but it was a 7.3 so I assume it's still in the range for the TSB at the dealer level. There has also been some posts on other forums about "leaks" with these external filter installs. I have to imagine 99% of any leak problem is the fault of the installer doing something wrong OR (maybe) using the CHEAPER filter with the plastic housing. Wrong would be all the stuff talked about earlier in this thread....Wrong type of hose, cheap worm clamps, not trying the compression fittings with barbed ends... If you do order a Magnefine filter from EBAY or AMAZON, Make sure the seller KNOWS you want a METAL HOUSING! No other will be accepted! I guess it's (possible) that Magnefine has changed production over to the plastic & maybe the metal is no longer available.??? Anyone bought one recently???
Well there ya go, That's my further 02 cent worth of info on the subject. DDT
 

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Edit: I removed the write up on the screw on filter, after realizing this thread was for the older gen trucks :oops:
 

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Thanks ford_doctor, I absolutely respect all your advice & opinions!
I know for myself when I have a problem like that one, and I think I have an (easy) plan of action, I would get (concerned) when I hear that maybe what I was going to do was (wrong). Especially if it were something I had little experience in/of. So that's why I threw the (suggestions) out there for the OP. He said he was "new" and didn't seem to know anything about this leak or the purpose of those lines.
If he (the OP) is still looking at this thread, It might be of interest to him to know that if these vehicles are brought to a dealer for transmission service, the dealer has a TBS to install an in - line filter. That photo does NOT look like what a dealer would have done (BUT WHO KNOWS). Maybe the PO cut the wrong line. Then cut the right line. Then later removed the in-line filter. That or a Tasmanian Devil was let loose under the chassis with a cutting tool! 😈 🔧 🛠 🗡 🔨 ✂!!! LOL.
So the OP (might) want to install the in-line filter as part of the repair. It's certainly not necessary & again, can be done at a later date very easily since the lines have already been cut. The filter goes on the RETURN LINE (correct me if I am wrong) which is identified as the line going to the REAR MOST position on the transmission (correct me if I am wrong). The proper filter is made by Magnefine (I can't find the # right now). Just started looking at some information & read something about the (newer) vehicles supposedly not needing the external filter because of some redesign aspect of the system. (didn't catch what year the OP said he had but it was a 7.3 so I assume it's still in the range for the TSB at the dealer level. There has also been some posts on other forums about "leaks" with these external filter installs. I have to imagine 99% of any leak problem is the fault of the installer doing something wrong OR (maybe) using the CHEAPER filter with the plastic housing. Wrong would be all the stuff talked about earlier in this thread....Wrong type of hose, cheap worm clamps, not trying the compression fittings with barbed ends... If you do order a Magnefine filter from EBAY or AMAZON, Make sure the seller KNOWS you want a METAL HOUSING! No other will be accepted! I guess it's (possible) that Magnefine has changed production over to the plastic & maybe the metal is no longer available.??? Anyone bought one recently???
Well there ya go, That's my further 02 cent worth of info on the subject. DDT
I think that you can still get the magnefine filter with metal housing.

Amazon.com : magnefine
 
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