The Diesel Stop banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
2001 F250 2x4. Tire size is 265x75R16. Apparently this size tire is hard to find these days, so the choice is rather limited.

It is a truck that regularly runs over grass. I have AT tires on it now--Toyo on the back and Firestone on the front. I'm considering going with mud grips in the back because whenever the grass is slippery, the tires just spin, then dig holes but won't get any traction.

I've been looking around for mud grips that are good for mostly paved driving but good for grass. There are many, most from manufacturers I've never heard of. My local Gateway Tire would have to order anything but this tire--Americus RUGGED M/T--and their price, including installation, balancing, etc. is $200 per tire. I'd be buying two tires for the rear and moving the rear tires to the front. Toyos would be in the neighborhood of $300+ per tire installed.

Online tires would be much cheaper, but I'd have to pay to get them installed and balanced.

So three questions--
1) Anyone have any thoughts on the Americus RUGGED M/T?
2) What M/T would you recommend for mixed driving?
3) If one buys online, will tire stores mount and balance them for you at what price?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,019 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,599 Posts
Even with a mud type tire you are still going to just spin on wet grass.

You need to put a bunch of weight in the bed to get the tires to bite. 500-1000 lbs should do it. Then even your AT tires should work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
If even mud grips will spin on wet grass, would it make sense to buy ATs and some sort of traction aid? I'm over 70, female, and need my truck bed often. Shifting 500 or a 1000 pounds of dead weight when I need the full bed would be nearly impossible for me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,599 Posts
That's a little bit of a predicament.

Depending on where you live hardware stores and places like Home Depot and Lowe's sell traction sand that is in a 80 lb or so tube. Even just a couple of them above the axle should help a lot. And you could have them place them into the bed. They don't take up much room since they are around 5" round and a couple of feet long.

The only other thing that you might look into would be a electronic locking rear differential and someone to install it. But there you are looking at close to $1500+.

Do you know if you have a limited slip rear end? If you have a puzzled look on your face right now you can check the sticker on the door jamb and checking this link to see if you do or not. If you do the rear end may need to be either rebuilt or serviced to get it working properly again.

https://www.drivetrain.com/parts-catalog/rear-end-a-differential-ring-gear-and-pinion-sets/what-rear-end-ratio-do-i-have-in-my-ford-is-it-posi

Other than that you might want to talk to your local tire dealer to see what they recommend for your type of situation. Other than that there are a few other ways to help with traction such as airing down the tires and then airing them back up when you get to the road.

Hopefully someone that has had your type of problem will chime in here to help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
The door sticker has C 1 under axle. According to the site you linked that is a 3.73 limited slip differential.

I'll have my mechanic check it out.

Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,019 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,918 Posts
The tire size you have 235/65/16 Load Range “E” should be an easy tire size to find. Most of us here have the same size on our trucks.

I would recommend you shop at Discount Tire.

What town do you live in?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,019 Posts
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top