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Hello I have a 2006 6.0 f250. I had a bad injector number 5. I tested the injector with a ohmmeter and then my chip that I have on my pickup told me that it was going bad. As I was driving it if you gave it a lot of throttle it would lose power or even to the point where I would die. I bought a new injector and replaced number 5 injector claimed out holder hole torqued to 30 lb. And put everything back together cycled in a few times to prime it. Started it ran for 5 minutes then Rev then died then revved then died then revved and now I can't get it to start not even with ether you guys have anything that might help me?
 

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Might be the FICM rather than the injector you swapped out. A friend's truck had a problem with the FICM (no-start). We couldn't get my scan tool to connect, but the info we did get pointed to either a bad injector OR the FICM. He took it to a shop and they replaced the FICM and he was good to go.
 

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Might be the FICM rather than the injector you swapped out. A friend's truck had a problem with the FICM (no-start). We couldn't get my scan tool to connect, but the info we did get pointed to either a bad injector OR the FICM. He took it to a shop and they replaced the FICM and he was good to go.
I will check the FICM out in the morning. That's probably what caused it to start running weird. If it ideled for like 20 to 30 minutes before going some where it would be fine. Sometime a hiccup here and there. And if it was cold they would drive a little ways and then just died that was before I fixed injector.
 

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I got the truck to start. Atlantic warm up for a little bit 10 minutes or so and then I took it for a drive when I got to 2000- 2200 RPMs it just lost power no throttle response felt like pickup died and then restart. The truck would pick back up and idle as long as I kept the truck under 2 200 RPMs it would drive normal could this be the ficm
 

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It could be the FICM. Dying or losing rpm's at 2000 rpm is more of an IPR behavior, but the FICM and IPR valve are the most common reasons. I wouldn't buy a new part yet. Get a scan tool and monitor a few engine parameters to see if you can get an idea what might be causing it.

You can download ForSCan Lite to a smartphone for a few dollars and then buy an ELM327 OBDII adapterfor about $30. I like the BAFX brand of adapters (WiFi for iOS and BlueTooth for Android). ForScan is a great code reader also!

You could try disconnecting the ICP sensor to see if that is perhaps causing the issue (it sometimes can cause your issues).

If you really think it is the FICM, I would send the FICM to FICMrepair.com to have it tested first. They are honest and wouldn't tell you it was bad unless it was. Then (for cheaper than a new FICM) they can repair it w/ upgraded parts.

The best scenario is if you have a spare (known to be good) FICM that yu could install as a test!

If you get the scan tool, monitor the following when driving:
ICP pressure
ICP voltage
ICP desired
IPR % duty cycle
 

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It could be the FICM. Dying or losing rpm's at 2000 rpm is more of an IPR behavior, but the FICM and IPR valve are the most common reasons. I wouldn't buy a new part yet. Get a scan tool and monitor a few engine parameters to see if you can get an idea what might be causing it.

You can download ForSCan Lite to a smartphone for a few dollars and then buy an ELM327 OBDII adapterfor about $30. I like the BAFX brand of adapters (WiFi for iOS and BlueTooth for Android). ForScan is a great code reader also!

You could try disconnecting the ICP sensor to see if that is perhaps causing the issue (it sometimes can cause your issues).

If you really think it is the FICM, I would send the FICM to FICMrepair.com to have it tested first. They are honest and wouldn't tell you it was bad unless it was. Then (for cheaper than a new FICM) they can repair it w/ upgraded parts.

The best scenario is if you have a spare (known to be good) FICM that yu could install as a test!

If you get the scan tool, monitor the following when driving:
ICP pressure
ICP voltage
ICP desired
IPR % duty cycle
It could be the FICM. Dying or losing rpm's at 2000 rpm is more of an IPR behavior, but the FICM and IPR valve are the most common reasons. I wouldn't buy a new part yet. Get a scan tool and monitor a few engine parameters to see if you can get an idea what might be causing it.

You can download ForSCan Lite to a smartphone for a few dollars and then buy an ELM327 OBDII adapterfor about $30. I like the BAFX brand of adapters (WiFi for iOS and BlueTooth for Android). ForScan is a great code reader also!

You could try disconnecting the ICP sensor to see if that is perhaps causing the issue (it sometimes can cause your issues).

If you really think it is the FICM, I would send the FICM to FICMrepair.com to have it tested first. They are honest and wouldn't tell you it was bad unless it was. Then (for cheaper than a new FICM) they can repair it w/ upgraded parts.

The best scenario is if you have a spare (known to be good) FICM that yu could install as a test!

If you get the scan tool, monitor the following when driving:
ICP pressure
ICP voltage
ICP desired
IPR % duty cycle
It could be the FICM. Dying or losing rpm's at 2000 rpm is more of an IPR behavior, but the FICM and IPR valve are the most common reasons. I wouldn't buy a new part yet. Get a scan tool and monitor a few engine parameters to see if you can get an idea what might be causing it.

You can download ForSCan Lite to a smartphone for a few dollars and then buy an ELM327 OBDII adapterfor about $30. I like the BAFX brand of adapters (WiFi for iOS and BlueTooth for Android). ForScan is a great code reader also!

You could try disconnecting the ICP sensor to see if that is perhaps causing the issue (it sometimes can cause your issues).

If you really think it is the FICM, I would send the FICM to FICMrepair.com to have it tested first. They are honest and wouldn't tell you it was bad unless it was. Then (for cheaper than a new FICM) they can repair it w/ upgraded parts.

The best scenario is if you have a spare (known to be good) FICM that yu could install as a test!

If you get the scan tool, monitor the following when driving:
ICP pressure
ICP voltage
ICP desired
IPR % duty cycle
Hi there so I have replaced the irp and it will start but it takes a long to start. Same with building oil pressure. I did get it started and test drove it around the block and at 1300 to 2000 rpm it falls on it face. I'm not sure what it might be now.
 

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Could you post the data requested in post #5?

Also, you might still have some air in the HPO system.
 

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...or fuel pressure. Should always be verified under load before condemning injectors.
 

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With air in the hpo would that make it take a long time to build oil pressure and start?
It might. I don't think air in the system is the entire issue, but it could be one of them.

You would still be MILES ahead by retrieving and posting the engine data that was requested.

Now days it is CHEAP to get a powerful diagnostic tool - I do not know why so many people resist that idea ........

Take the above fuel pressure suggestion seriously. Every 6.0L owner should have a fuel pressure gauge. This one can get expensive because you need a sensor AND a gauge. Our engines did not come with a fuel pressure sensor. An electronic gauge system could be $150 - $200. If you take it in and have the fuel pressure tested, it will probably cost about the same. You could just put a manual gauge on it, but fuel pressure MUST be tested at WOT conditions.

When my fuel pump went out on me recently (at apprx. 200k miles), I quickly saw it on my fuel pressure gauge. I did not drive it much at all with low fuel pressure. Low fuel pressure will damage your EXPENSIVE injectors.
 

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What are the best items to monitor with AE and more importantly what should the values be?
What is your goal?

Troubleshooting a current problem? Continuous monitoring for early detection of a problem?

A common issue (described above) is low fuel pressure damaging injectors. AE can not measure fuel pressure. You need an independent gauge system for that.

Another common issue with our engines is a clogged oil cooler. Lots of people are buying used 6.0L trucks and getting surprised with an engine that already has a clogged oil cooler. Monitoring oil and coolant temperatures is the way to identify that.

I like to have continuous monitoring of oil, coolant, and transmission temps. AE is not a good choice for continuous monitoring (I assume it is on your laptop). As stated above, I also monitor fuel pressure. In addition (out of paranoia), I monitor the pressure on the degas bottle. Lastly, I keep an eye on system voltage. I do not want an alternator issue to cause FICM and/or battery issues.

If you are having a no-start (or other engine issues), you need to pull codes first! Identifying whether or not you have cam/crank sync and FICM sync would be next. Then I would imagine retrieving the parameters I posted in post #5 would be important to look at. In addition, FICM problems are somewhat common, so monitoring FICM MPower, LPower, and VPower is helpful.

All that said, if you have an engine start issue there are things you need to do that don't require a monitoring system. Sop many people don;t ever look at oil level, fuel condition and quality, battery condition (charge and load test individually), wire harness check for problems, etc before starting their parts replacement!
 
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