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Got a Detroit Diesel 8 V 92 with an empty coolant tank. The coolant is in the oil pan. Oil dipstick level is way above normal. Color is milky gray. I would swear that this happened while parked, and cold. But, a couple of people have told me, that's impossible. They said, the engine had to be running whenever this happened. It's been parked for several months. The last drive was a very short 2 miles to fuel up. Engine has always run smooth and strong. Less than 180,000 total miles. Anything you can think of to tell me, I would greatly appreciate. Please let me hear from you? And, don't assume I know anything. Cause I don't. Thanks.
 

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I'm not real familiar with the DD8V92, other than it's a diesel :winking:, but I'm sure there will be someone along that can help with more.
If the coolant and oil have mixed, most likely the engine was running to cause that. Turns the oil into chocolate pudding.
If it has an oil cooler, a leak there can be the cause. Or a cracked cylinder liner, or blown headgasket, either of which means a teardown.
 

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Got a Detroit Diesel 8 V 92 with an empty coolant tank. The coolant is in the oil pan. Oil dipstick level is way above normal. Color is milky gray. I would swear that this happened while parked, and cold. But, a couple of people have told me, that's impossible. They said, the engine had to be running whenever this happened. It's been parked for several months. The last drive was a very short 2 miles to fuel up. Engine has always run smooth and strong. Less than 180,000 total miles. Anything you can think of to tell me, I would greatly appreciate. Please let me hear from you? And, don't assume I know anything. Cause I don't. Thanks.
The fact that the engine oil is milky gray tells us that the engine has been run with coolant in the crankcase. When running the oil and coolant mix and emulsify creating the grey color.

Unfortunately, you have some potentially expensive diagnostics and repairs ahead. There are a lot of things on that engine that could allow coolant to leak into the crankcase starting with the obvious cracks in the cylinder heads or the block, head gasket, charge air cooler (depending on which type your engine uses) the oil cooler, cylinder liner seals, injector tubes, the water pump and if equipped, the air compressor. Water pumps seem to be somewhat common.
 

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The fact that the engine oil is milky gray tells us that the engine has been run with coolant in the crankcase. When running the oil and coolant mix and emulsify creating the grey color.

Unfortunately, you have some potentially expensive diagnostics and repairs ahead. There are a lot of things on that engine that could allow coolant to leak into the crankcase starting with the obvious cracks in the cylinder heads or the block, head gasket, charge air cooler (depending on which type your engine uses) the oil cooler, cylinder liner seals, injector tubes, the water pump and if equipped, the air compressor. Water pumps seem to be somewhat common.
 

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Wow, first of all the 92 series will NOT tolerate antifreeze in the oil pan. if it has been used that way most likely it has spun main bearings. Coolant in the oil comes from coolant pressure when shut down due to oil pressure in not there. SO, therefore several things to keep in mind and they all are not cheap. Leaking injector cup seals seen from the rocker cover removed and streaks coming from the injector area. Cracked or damaged cylinderhead or burn't o rings between head/block. Improper rebuild by not checking liner/block height and coolant passing by liner/block. Overheated engine causing liner seals to crystalize and allow coolant to pass into drain pan. Blocked drain tubes allowing coolant to drain into cylinder and then into oil pan.
The 2 cycle engines will NOT tolerate coolant temperatures exceeding 200*F.
Im retired DDA master engine mech w/30 years exp.formally known as Gonefishen on this site.
 

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Gonefishen is right, this lowly less experienced mechanic seconds his thoughts there.
Just dealt with an 8V92 in the shop and the O-rings around each of the cylinder sleeves were burnt up and needed to be replaced, not all to uncommon. Hopefully you caught this before burning up any bearings.
 
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