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During my trip pulling our 5er I saw oil temp of 240 pulling the hills on I26 near Johnson City Tenn. Is this normal temps ?
I never saw over 225 on my 6.0
 

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Not specifically sure but Ford tends to creep towards the 250*+ limit before the PCM takes action. Remember these trucks have been getting more sensors over the years. Each has a purpose and value to report. When those numbers are not where they should be as determined by Ford the PCM algorithm takes hold and sends alerts as needed.
 

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Heavy, thanks. Since my post, I found the following numbers in a Ford publication:

a) Maximum Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT): 220° F (Gasoline), 234° F (Diesel)
b) Maximum Engine Oil Sump Temperature: 284° F
c) Maximum Transmission Oil Temperature (TOT): 250° F
d) Maximum Catalyst Temperature: varies (not intended for aftermarket monitoring).

https://madocumentupload.marketingassociates.com/api/Document/GetFile?v1=4311692&v2=060118100454&v3=60&v4=e35035c585ffa71190cafcc1c7f7d4f3c694d52a053efb032c790ed8&v5=False

My aim is to catch climbing temps before they hit max. That might give me time to find a place to pull over.
 

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As Heavy stated, 240 is not a problem as long as the temp goes back down when the climb eases. I drive a 2017 F-350 6.7 L Powerstroke, and it has been an adjustment getting used to higher temps in the engine and transmission. I have owned a 2008 F-350 6.0 L and a 2012 F-350 6.7L and my 2017 operating temps during steep/long pulls are noticeably higher than both.
 

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Normally in country/city driving, untethered, see ~194 nominal. While towing with fiver, level, climbs to 204-208 range. Tackling steep climb, on cruise control, in 63-65 mph range, engine speeds up, turbo boost up, see engine lube oil temperatures climb to 220. So took it off cruise control, use foot control and slower. What I look for is a engine speed, truck speed up the longer climbs where temperature does rise, but becomes steady, stable with no additional rise. That way some fooling, stabilization effected. Speed may drop to 45-50 mph range, but don’t want to harm engine and tranny.

Usually during these long climbs, tranny fluid temperatures not rise much higher, and I take that as good sign. Engine lube oil will climb higher due to extra fuel and turbo boost, incurring extra heat overall.
 
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