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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey folks; This has happened twice in 2 days...
The first, I started the truck (it had only been sitting 45 mins, and was still warm) and began to pull away and immediately noticed that I had next to no power, and boost guage (Dash) was buried on the ZERO. I pulled over onto the shoulder and shut off truck, restarted and the problem was immediately gone.
Today the truck initially ran fine for about 30 mins of driving, then after a short trip through town at close to idle speed I attempted to accelerate onto the highway and noticed that at some point while going through town it had started again... I had very limited power and again zero on the boost guage.
This time I attempted to accelerate to see what happened and a couple of seconds after the truck downshifted and started working hard, the turbos suddenly spooled up and the gauge came back up and again, the problem was gone.
There are no codes, No CEL, Fuel filters are fairly new, no funny noises under the hood.

I originally thought this was electrical because I could resolve it by restarting... but the fact that I could also force it to resolve, makes me think that the Turbos may actually be not spinning when this is happening.

Can someone lend some insight?
 

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have someone sit in your truck and key on all the way to but short of start while you're under the hood looking straight down on the turbo... you ought to see the actuator move while it sets the turbo... if you don't, it's most likely your VGT module is toast, which isn't common but it isn't unheard of, either... not a difficult fix at all, if it is... remove, replace, go on about your business...

i wouldn't run it too much until this is fixed... you have fuel present but no air, which makes that fuel burn really really hot, which can melt stuff- namely, pistons...
 

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Not an expert.

There are some codes that do not produce a CEL. Some Ford specific codes can not be read by all readers/scanners.

Under certain conditions when the truck goes into reduced power mode it will produce a code and store it in memory. If you scan with a scanner that can see the code you have to be sure that you don’t clear it from memory with that scanner.

Some times when the truck goes into reduced power it will disable the cruise control, if it does this then there is most probably a code stored. I say this because the next time this happens try engaging the cruise control and see if it is disable.

I’m not sure what year truck you have, but my 2008 was doing almost the same thing and it was a stuck EGR valve what I believe is a common failure because the dealer put in a revised EGR valve. If you have a small coolant hoses going to and from the EGR valve it means you have the older type EGR valve.

Again I’m not an expert and if your truck is a 2008.
If I were you I’d check for hoses going to the EGR valve and the next time it happens see if the cruise control is working, If not then a code is stored. The only sure way I know of to see a code is to go to a dealer and have it retrieved from memory. I believe that when you have restarted the truck, the code is being reset but not cleared. The PCM is going through a sensor check and the conditions are gone that reduced your power. If it was a condition that would cause damage to the engine it would not most likely produce a CEL and not clear to the problem was repaired.

Please keep us updated... it will help others.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks everyone. MPD I am EGR deleted, so I think this is something different... Drew I will do what you suggest and get back to you. In addition I just got back from a road trip, and while I didn't have a return of the problem mentioned above, I find that the throttle seems a little choppy when accelerating, I am used to this being a very smooth driving truck and it feels different right now. I am starting to wonder if this is a HPFP issue. What do you guys think?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Update:
Much to my dismay, after a lot of looking around I found a tear in the rubber boot connecting my AI to the turbo... :-( I can't believe I hadn't seen it before now but it was on the bottom of the boot. It was wide open access into my turbo and the vains show it... Lots of dusting and some nicks that tell me that maybe something momentarily got lodged in there and hung up the turbo giving me my issues.
Thankfully there is no play in the shaft and it is currently spinning freely and quietly.

I did want to note though, another discovery I made: I had never went ahead with the CCV mod as I frequently checked for oil residue and would never see any. During that time however I was running at STOCK power levels. For the last few weeks I have been running a hot tune, and when I pulled the AI this time it was absolutely polluted with motor oil, and so was the inside of my turbo! I don't mean a residue, I mean dripping out of the tube. I hate to think how much made it to my IC.
Thus, I can definitely say: At stock power levels the separation/ oil fill canister seems to do a decent job. But at high horse power levels, the CCV mod is an absolute must.

Here's to hoping I don't need new turbos just yet ;-)

Thanks everyone for your insight
 
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