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Discussion Starter #1
2001 RWD F250

This is a very basic question that I have just started wondering about. My truck was fitted out with cheap brake pads last August. Both front and rear were completely gone. I was told that cheap brake pads tended to have a 1 year lifespan, so I took it in for a brake pad replacement. The rear brakes were very worn but the front brakes had over 60% of wear left. I was told by a friend that in cars rear brakes usually lasted much longer than front brakes. So my question.

Do these heavy diesel trucks put more wear on the rear brakes in normal driving than cars? I have used the truck several times this past year with a flatbed trailer to haul heavy things--my tractor and 4500 lb loads of hay, but only once or twice each. The trailer does not have trailer brakes, so I know that would put extra pressure on the rear brakes, but the truck itself is also very heavy compared to a car. In normal use would this kind of truck use up rear pads more than front ones?

I have now replaced the rear brakes with severe duty pads.
 

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Simple answer is NO. Physics...If both front and rear calipers are functioning properly, there will be more wear faster on the front brake pads. I suspect that your front brakes are not functioning properly. Bleed the entire system and see what you find. Possibly burnt fluid.
 

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Your description is choppy, so I'm not sure what happened in what order. But I agree that a brake system malfunction is the most-likely cause. Were the brakes cleaned & greased properly during assembly?
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Here's what happened. Back last summer, I had both front and rear brake pads installed by a shade tree mechanic who has worked for me for years. They were the cheapest ones Auto Zone sold for my truck. I have no idea if he cleaned the brakes and greased them during assembly. At the time, the shade tree mechanic told me that those brake pads usually lasted about a year and that the front ones wore faster than the rear ones.

The year was up, so I decided to have new brake pads installed--better ones. Yesterday I took my rig to a local tire shop with mechanics that I have used for years. It's a completely local business . Unfortunately I had bought two sets of rear pads by mistake, so they installed the new rear pads and said that the rear pads were almost gone. They didn't suggest buying new front ones because they said the front pads showed only about 40% wear. The set of rear brakes that they installed came with grease, so I'm sure they did use that on the rear.

I also had my trailer wheels serviced. The bearings were packed, and I was told that they were all "loose", so they were "tightened up."

After I got the truck and trailer back yesterday, a friend took it on a road trip and brought me home 4 round bales of hay. When he dropped off the rig, he told me that he had heard a roaring on the driver's side that might be a wheel bearing going bad.

This morning I took the truck back to the shop after reading that the front brakes should wear faster than the rear ones. I have just heard back from them.

The brake fluid was clean. They checked the calipers and rotors and found nothing wrong. They checked the wheel bearings and said they were all "tight" and nothing was wrong. I asked them if they had repacked the bearings and was told that this truck had a unified hub and bearing system and didn't need repacking. Now I was talking to the front desk person, not the actual mechanic. One of the guys who worked there told me that the front desk guy isn't always right, but the mechanics do know what they are doing.

I feel that if the mechanics had found something wrong, they would have told the front desk guy that something needed work.

I'm a bit confused, because you can buy wheel bearings for this truck separately from the hub. Do they need regular repacking or not?

This is my third 7.3L F250, albeit a 2001, and I've never had a minute's problem with the wheels and hubs. Brakes yes, but that's because I didn't understand about needing to replace brake pads as often as these seem to need replacing.

Right now, I'm only going to use severe duty stuff on this truck because it does pull trailers.
 

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Could the roaring on the right side have been the trailer loaded with round bales?

I agree the mechanics would have notified you if they found a problem.
 
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