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Has anyone added a 2008 read diff cover to an earlier truck, say a 2000 srw? I picked one up at a swqp meet but there is no gasket. Looks like its groved for an "o" ring but dealer says no. Silicone and go?? Any other ideas? Thanks.
 

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Longer harware is required and good silicone for the gasket. I did mine and have had no issues.
 

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Yeah the bolts need to be longer. Then silicone it on and have fun. :ford:
 

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Silicone and go??
That's the short version.

The longer version is:

First, get new bolts that are long enough. The "factory" bolts that come with the 2008 SRW diff cover have an allen head insted of hex, so if that's the bolts you get, be sure you have an allen wrench that fits them exactly. The bolts from your stock steel cover are too short for the thicker aluminum cover.

Next, remove all but one bolt at the top of the old cover. Pry the cover off at the bottom and get ready for a big mess if you don't have a big enough drip pan. Let it drain and drip for several minutes, then remove that last bolt and remove the cover.

Then be certain both mating surfaces are squeeky clean - use brake parts cleaner or some such. Then get the mating surfaces dry before you add a bead of high-temp silicon RTV gasket maker to the cover.

Stick two bolts into the top of the cover and lift it up and start those bolts without messing up the bead of RTV. Then slide the cover into place and hold it tight while you tighten those two bolts finger tight.

Then get all the other bolts started and finger tight. Then use a torque wrench and get all the bolts to about 10 lb/ft, then final tighten all bolts to 24 lb/ft. (Higher torque on the bolts is for the bolts in the steel cover. With the aluminum cover, the 2008 workshop manual specifies 24 lb/ft.)

Wait one hour or more to allow the silicon seal to set.

Fill up with 75w140 synthetic gear lube. If you have a limited slip rear end, you may need to add between 4 and 8 ounces of friction modifier before you pour in part of the 4th quart of gear lube.

Any brand of synthetic 75w140 gear lube will do. I used Wal-Mart's house brand, but it's also made by Royal Purple, AMSoil, Mobil 1, etc.
 

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Any specs on the bolts? I just ordered my cover.
 

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When I ordered mine it came with the bolts. You should check with the seller to see if it comes with bolts already.:ford:
 

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nice info smokey...
cspid drilled and tapped his for a gauge...nice option if you think you will ever add one..

course as healso said ,
it was a pretty boring gauge to watch, and not much you can do about it anyway, cept pull over and stop.
 

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When I ordered mine it came with the bolts. You should check with the seller to see if it comes with bolts already.:ford:
I did...they don't have the bolts and washers. So what diameter, thread, length and strength were yours?
 

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Smokey, that was an outstanding write up!

I use the Navistar oil pan silicone for almost everything- my neighbor works at a truck repair shop and it comes in their overhaul kits so he always has extra tubes of it.

That stuff is really durable and has adhesion qualities far above anything you buy off the rack at the local autoparts stores. The funny thing is, I bought a tube of Ford's version of it and it was NOWHERE NEAR the quality or density of Navistar's.

As Smokey said, "squeeky clean." I've found that tapped holes tend to hold a lot of oil in them that compromises sealant integrity, so make sure you use carb or brake cleaner with the little red probe clear down into the base of the holes. I usually clean them out with Q-tips afterwards until the Q-tips come out spotless. Sometimes it takes 3 or 4 tries to get all of that oil out of holes. Blow the holes out with compressed air afterwards. If you don't have a compressor, go to office depot and buy a throw away can of compressed air from them.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks all!! As soon as the weather breaks Im on it.
 

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I did...they don't have the bolts and washers. So what diameter, thread, length and strength were yours?

1.25 x 5/16-18 cap head (allen head) bolts and 5/16 washers
I used stainless bolts and washers. Before the install, I cleaned the cover with brake cleaner and then sprayed 3 coats of Krylon clear on the cover. After the first Michigan winter, the cover still looks like new.
Bob
 

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Perfect...thanks.
I'm thinking of painting it black, but leaving in between the fins , or the fin tops, clear.
 

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2008 Diff Cover

Hey guys
Does anyone have a ford part# for the diff cover.
The cover should fit an 06 f350 dually dana 80 correct.

thanks
 

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The cover should fit an 06 f350 dually dana 80 correct.
No.

The aluminum diff cover for a 2008 SRW will fit all SRW diesel diffs for the last 20 years. But it won't fit the Dana 80 diff in your Dooley.

Another source for the SRW diff cover is long-time sponsor of TheDieselStop David Murphy at DieselManor. His costs more, but includes the bolts and washers you need to install it. DieselManor - Ford Sterling Differential cover

You have to have the bolts and washers, so if you order from someone else, be sure theirs includes the bolts and washers. the Ford part number is included in the DieselManor link.
 

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That's the short version.

The longer version is:

First, get new bolts that are long enough. The "factory" bolts that come with the 2008 SRW diff cover have an allen head insted of hex, so if that's the bolts you get, be sure you have an allen wrench that fits them exactly. The bolts from your stock steel cover are too short for the thicker aluminum cover.

Next, remove all but one bolt at the top of the old cover. Pry the cover off at the bottom and get ready for a big mess if you don't have a big enough drip pan. Let it drain and drip for several minutes, then remove that last bolt and remove the cover.

Then be certain both mating surfaces are squeeky clean - use brake parts cleaner or some such. Then get the mating surfaces dry before you add a bead of high-temp silicon RTV gasket maker to the cover.

Stick two bolts into the top of the cover and lift it up and start those bolts without messing up the bead of RTV. Then slide the cover into place and hold it tight while you tighten those two bolts finger tight.

Then get all the other bolts started and finger tight. Then use a torque wrench and get all the bolts to about 10 lb/ft, then final tighten all bolts to 24 lb/ft. (Higher torque on the bolts is for the bolts in the steel cover. With the aluminum cover, the 2008 workshop manual specifies 24 lb/ft.)

Wait one hour or more to allow the silicon seal to set.

Fill up with 75w140 synthetic gear lube. If you have a limited slip rear end, you may need to add between 4 and 8 ounces of friction modifier before you pour in part of the 4th quart of gear lube.

Any brand of synthetic 75w140 gear lube will do. I used Wal-Mart's house brand, but it's also made by Royal Purple, AMSoil, Mobil 1, etc.

Is the use of RTV still necessary when you are using brand new gasket? From my understanding, I simply clean both mating surfaces, replace the gasket, and torque all the bolts down to spec. My rear pumpkin is leaking and I gotta bust that badboy out soon so any help is appreciated.
 

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Hey guys
Does anyone have a ford part# for the diff cover.
The cover should fit an 06 f350 dually dana 80 correct.

thanks
Look into the TOW BOSS package, there was an upgraded rear cover for the DRW trucks that was part of that package.
I think the cover was like $150+!!
 

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Is the use of RTV still necessary when you are using brand new gasket? From my understanding, I simply clean both mating surfaces, replace the gasket, and torque all the bolts down to spec.
Ford doesn't use a gasket, other than the RTV (gasket maker). However, pre-made gaskets are available at some auto parts stores for the Ford 10.5" "Sterling" rear diff cover. If you use a gasket, then you wouldn't use any RTV - unless you are a "belt and suspenders" guy. ;)
 

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Before painting or otherwise treating the cast aluminium cover you may want to consider the impact to heat transfer. I had bare aluminum in Pac NW. I'd no do it unless you have a corrosive environment, salt air, or on salted winter roads. Anything on it will reduce ability to shed heat as opposed to bare aluminium. If in a corrosive enviroment, mabe anodizing is an option, (unk $) that way you get superior heat transfer with corrosion resistance as long as coating is un-damaged (scratched, nicked or gouged) Google thermodynamic tramission or heat transfer for metals for more info.
 
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