The Diesel Stop banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a Ford 1996 converted E-350 Econoline V8 7.3L ambulance and both my front batteries are death. One is a fairly standard battery (850 cca, 1000 ca, group 65), but the other one is a special emergency heavy duty battery (600 cca, group 50) which means I need to order it and it costs so much more than the standard battery. Anyone knows if it would be possible to replace the emergency battery with a slightly lower cca battery, f.e. a 500 cca, 625 ca, group 51 battery? The 51 group battery is only 2cm wider (I still need to check if it would fit properly) but the other measurements are a bit smaller that the group 50 battery.

Since all the very heavy ambulance equipment is gone and replaced by a simple bed and small kitchen and I'm not towing anything I thought I could go with a slightly lighter battery, or doesn't it work like that?

Any help would be highly appreciated.

Sofie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,019 Posts
I would try to put two identical group 65 batteries in there if it is possible. Even if you had to get a new battery tray, I think it would be worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,744 Posts
Any 12V battery will work fine. The higher the reserve, the longer it will power things while the engine is OFF. A high-quality flooded-cell (normal) battery is much better (performance for the money) than any specialty (AGM, dry cell, Lithium, etc.) battery. I recommend MotorCraft TesteToughMax, Sears DieHard Gold, & Interstate MTP/MT2. Read the captions in this photo album:


(phone app link)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,839 Posts
Since all the very heavy ambulance equipment is gone and replaced by a simple bed and small kitchen and I'm not towing anything I thought I could go with a slightly lighter battery, or doesn't it work like that?
Yes it does. A set of Optima Red Top AGM 800CCA batteries are long lasting and have plenty of power. I've gone through 2 sets over the years and each set was still holding up after 6 years service. These engines require 800-900 CCA batteries because first, the glow plugs suck a LOT of amperage and secondly the starter requires way more amps than a gas engine starter. The boat/RV batteries are designed to be fully discharged then recharged for longest life. They don't hold up as long in an automotive/truck normal use.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top