The Diesel Stop banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Thought I should start a new thread for replacing rigid fuel line. Line has a hole from rubbing against oil pan. The length of line runs from just forward of selection valve to the lift pump where it transitions to a short section of hose with hose clamps attaching to lift pump. I'll take the advise of replacing with new 3/8" brake line. What's the easiest way to match all the bends and how do I get it back in place? Looks like 5' or so of line. Also is there a way to keep fuel from siphoning out of the tank? It's been dripping for 3 days while I've waited for temps to rise to a working level. Now it's in the mid twenties and dripping 60/min. Happy holidays everyone, I really appreciate the knowledge and experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,839 Posts
I'd just pull the line, cut it in two at the hole, blow out any debris, and put it back together using a brass pipe union.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
What's the deal with the clips on top of the selector valve? Figured it would be easier to remove line there after not seeing how to undo plastic/metal fuel line junction. I can get enough room to cut along frame rail. Bad idea to cut there also and have two couplers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,839 Posts
Don't know about the clips, it's 9° so no way I'm crawling under my truck. By couplers if you mean pipe unions, you can use as many as you want. They're used under the dash for air powered wipers, and every where else for air valves on big trucks using 120 PSI air pressure so they'll be trouble free on a low pressure fuel line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,599 Posts
Don't know about the clips, it's 9° so no way I'm crawling under my truck. By couplers if you mean pipe unions, you can use as many as you want. They're used under the dash for air powered wipers, and every where else for air valves on big trucks using 120 PSI air pressure so they'll be trouble free on a low pressure fuel line.
They also make tubing unions with compression fittings, that fit right over the tubing, no threading or sweating. Just cut the bad spot out and put the union in its place, then tighten the nuts till they crush the ferrule. No muss no fuss. There are even 90* unions so you can make a corner without using a bender. They all work well, and hold enough pressure that you should never have any trouble with your fuel line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,839 Posts
They also make tubing unions with compression fittings, that fit right over the tubing, no threading or sweating. Just cut the bad spot out and put the union in its place, then tighten the nuts till they crush the ferrule. No muss no fuss. There are even 90* unions so you can make a corner without using a bender. They all work well, and hold enough pressure that you should never have any trouble with your fuel line.
Yessir, that's perzactly the type I was referring to. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,744 Posts
Another option is hard nylon tubing, which is what Ford used/uses on many other vehicles. It's inexpensive, flexible, durable, & easy to work with. Bends can be made semipermanent with a common heat gun (or torch with fan shield). It will just slip onto the correct-sized hose barb, & seal without any clamp - just a drop of motor oil for lube.


(phone app link)


That's how Ford connected it to early ('84-91) plastic, brass, & stainless EFI fittings operating between 30-100 psi of gas, so it will easily handle 10 psi diesel.


(phone app link)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,599 Posts
Another option is hard nylon tubing, which is what Ford used/uses on many other vehicles. It's inexpensive, flexible, durable, & easy to work with. Bends can be made semipermanent with a common heat gun (or torch with fan shield). It will just slip onto the correct-sized hose barb, & seal without any clamp - just a drop of motor oil for lube.


(phone app link)


That's how Ford connected it to early ('84-91) plastic, brass, & stainless EFI fittings operating between 30-100 psi of gas, so it will easily handle 10 psi diesel.


(phone app link)
But that would require you to replace a steel line that only has a hole rubbed in it. Much easier, and faster to just make a permant patch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
The clips you referred to are located at the selector valve and are a part of the plastic casing that the fuel line goes into. They are easily removed if you push the fuel line into the casing and at the same time pull the clip out. It's plastic and it is u=shaped shaped like a horse shoe but much smaller. The clip itself applies pressure to an o-ring and prevents fuel from leaking after the line is installed.

If you go this route, draw a diagram of which line goes where as they are two different sizes and colors. You can also get diesel fuel line on Amazon.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top