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I鈥檝e got that problem figured out, even with the hose around the belt. I went with the coolant filter from XDP and am building my own custom bracket. I鈥檒l post a picture when done........changing the filter should be a snap馃榾
I can change a filter no problem, just can't use an around-the-belt upper RAD hose. I have been running a coolant filter for so many years that the system is very clean, so changing coolant filter is typically years apart.
 

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I can change a filter no problem, just can't use an around-the-belt upper RAD hose. I have been running a coolant filter for so many years that the system is very clean, so changing coolant filter is typically years apart.
If you use the around the belt NAPA hose pictured it will work
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Discussion Starter · #63 ·

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bigb, what鈥檚 the sender in the filter base for - a coolant temperature gage?
Yes, I have a Dipricol coolant temp gauge in my 4 gauge pillar pod.
 

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That temp sensor is a good way to tell if the coolant filter is getting clogged. If it's a lot cooler than the water pump mounted sensor, then you should change the filter.
 

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That temp sensor is a good way to tell if the coolant filter is getting clogged. If it's a lot cooler than the water pump mounted sensor, then you should change the filter.
My aftermarket gauge actually alerted me to a faulty thermostat. One day the gauge just started going way up high then dropping repeatedly. At first I though there was a problem with the gauge or the sender but after replacing the thermostat all was well, that was over 5 years ago. It was one of the 203 stats purchased from one of the respected vendors, don't remember which one.
I'm not sure but isn't the factory gauge just a stepper?
 

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The ECT sensor is analog, but you're likely thinking about the factory Oil Pressure sensor which is just a switch that closes at about 7 psi oil pressure.
 

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For what purpose?
Here are two photos of how I protected my oil cooler from the DS exhaust manifold heat, 20 bucks,15 minutes
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. Back on the filter end the exhaust manifold is 3/16" radially from where cooler tube goes into the rear standard, almost right on top of and inline with where the internal o-ring is, that's what fails.
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
To keep the exhaust manifold heat off of it. It will help the Orings live longer. It can also make it easier for the coolant to cool the oil.
Thanks Nick
Here are two photos of how I protected my oil cooler from the DS exhaust manifold heat, 20 bucks,15 minutes View attachment 187973
View attachment 187972
. Back on the filter end the exhaust manifold is 3/16" radially from where cooler tube goes into the rear standard, almost right on top of and inline with where the internal o-ring is, that's what fails.
Thanks for the picture Jim......... I guess I didn鈥檛 realize how close together they were until Nick and you pointed that out. I鈥檓 surprised Ford didn鈥檛 put some kind of shield around the cooler from the factory.
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
That thread caught a lot of attention. It lead to a lot of customers wanting theirs done when I was doing up pipes. It then spun off to oil coolers and turbos when rebuilding them.
I crawled under the truck to take another look see and you guys are right. What do you think about an alternate based on my experience working on combustion and our bar furnaces at work which get extremely hot...... much hotter than the exhaust manifolds. Sometimes we get a hot spot where internal furnace heat burns through the skin of the furnace. We鈥檝e had guys put K-wool over the holes which actually makes heat damage worse as the heat is concentrated on the outside of the furnace - where it doesn鈥檛 belong.

I had an old piece of 3鈥漟urnace pipe which I snaked up into place, which would not only create a shield but would also leave an air gap for additional heat dissipation. I would make a couple bolt attachment
Points so it doesn鈥檛 rattle or vibrate - then add self adhesive foilized reflective fabric like I did on my revamped bed to protect from the exhaust pipe heat?

Wood Motor vehicle Bumper Automotive exterior Gas


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Here鈥檚 a similar pic of the replacement heat shield I built for under the bed with reflective material:

Wood Rectangle Grey Gas Tints and shades


metal shield was painted the Ford Grey and reflective material attached:


Wood Rectangle Grey Font Gas
 

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I crawled under the truck to take another look see and you guys are right. What do you think about an alternate based on my experience working on combustion and our bar furnaces at work which get extremely hot...... much hotter than the exhaust manifolds. Sometimes we get a hot spot where internal furnace heat burns through the skin of the furnace. We鈥檝e had guys put K-wool over the holes which actually makes heat damage worse as the heat is concentrated on the outside of the furnace - where it doesn鈥檛 belong.

I had an old piece of 3鈥漟urnace pipe which I snaked up into place, which would not only create a shield but would also leave an air gap for additional heat dissipation. I would make a couple bolt attachment
Points so it doesn鈥檛 rattle or vibrate - then add self adhesive foilized reflective fabric like I did on my revamped bed to protect from the exhaust pipe heat?

View attachment 187976

View attachment 187977

View attachment 187978

Here鈥檚 a similar pic of the replacement heat shield I built for under the bed with reflective material:

View attachment 187980

metal shield was painted the Ford Grey and reflective material attached:


View attachment 187981
I believe what you have done will be a big improvement. It's more a case of reflecting radiant than insulation, which as you point out with KO Wool can have counter intuitive consequences. I also believe just how often or problematic DS manifold heat killing the cooler o-rings depends upon other factors.

1. Exhaust flow freedom from x-manifold to exit. Closing it up with a stock muffler and drive it normal daily driver style will still kill the o-rings

2. Loaded use and frequency of extended high boost and parallel high temperature events.

3. Mods, more fuel for power is more heat.

4. "Driving it like you stole it" ; Exciting but costly if you didn't steal it and have to pay to play with it. I have a neighbor that can't seem to keep a cooler from leaking, but he drives like Demons are chasing him.

Long as we are writing about pro active shielding, there is an exhaust down tube spot on the PS that could use a shield to protect the heads oil rail circle plug, which is o-ring sealed.
 

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Look good. I am concerned about these mounting holes that you speak of.
I thought you were taking it off to put new Orings on so if you are not, that type of shield set up is the way to go.
That sure looks like soot on that filter head. If it is soot, you need to run that down. Check that up pipe connection at exhaust manifold. Picture is not focusing on that issue but it looks like it鈥檚 coming down from the exhaust manifold.
That extruded plastic loom in your pyrometer lead was awful close to manifold and you have it on braided metal that can get hot. That deal is not good. If the want to cover that, get spark plug wire heat shield material sleeving from DEI or Thermotech.
Nice looking job on bed shields馃憤
 

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Discussion Starter · #76 ·
Look good. I am concerned about these mounting holes that you speak of.
I thought you were taking it off to put new Orings on so if you are not, that type of shield set up is the way to go.
That sure looks like soot on that filter head. If it is soot, you need to run that down. Check that up pipe connection at exhaust manifold. Picture is not focusing on that issue but it looks like it鈥檚 coming down from the exhaust manifold.
That extruded plastic loom in your pyrometer lead was awful close to manifold and you have it on braided metal that can get hot. That deal is not good. If the want to cover that, get spark plug wire heat shield material sleeving from DEI or Thermotech.
Nice looking job on bed shields馃憤
Yes, I鈥檓 still going to remove and rebuild the cooler, just in the planning stage of a metal shield since reviewing your and Jim鈥檚 posts. And, yes I have soot down low on the manifold and also up on the up pipes where the donuts are worn. That will be the next phase after this- buying new bellowed up pipes, (probably Riffraff) maybe new manifolds, (the manifold bolts are severely eroded) a EBPV deleted pedestal, a wicked wheel and take the turbo assembly to be balanced. I may be buying all the parts out this summer and farming out the work to a trusted diesel mechanic I鈥檝e used before. He told me he was fine with me putting the parts together. I鈥檒l wait and see how the rest of this work goes. Everything I鈥檝e read about the turbo/collector/up pipes sounds like a royal PIA 馃榾
 
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