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I have a 99 PSD and I only plug it in during the winter months. Sometimes after the block heater has been plugged in I can feel the warmth in the plugs and sometimes not. The truck doesn't seem to get warm that quickly after using it sometimes. Is there a way to check it? Where does it go into the block and how much are they? Are they a pain to replace? I tried a search but I kept getting no matches. Thanks for any info.

Shawn
 

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I could always here water movement when I plugged my 93 in. I have not plugged in the the 2000 yet.

The heaters go into the side of the block. Well, they did on my 93, have not really looked at my 2000. Fairley cheap to buy at a auto store of farm fleet. Easy to install.
 

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the block heater on the psd are in the oil cooler housing just above the oil filter. as for replacing one i have never done it i just kept good glow plugs and a good relay in. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/shrug.gif
 

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Is there a way to check it? Where does it go into the block ...
Crawl under the truck with your head under the oil filter. Look up to the base of the oil filter and you'll see the part that sticks out of the water jacket. Here's what you'll see:


After it's plugged on for at least a couple of hours, the block heater and the metal housing the block heater screws into should be warm. If not, then yours may be burned out.

The oil filter base is also one end of the engine oil cooler. The block heater is emerged in a water jacket - not an oil jacket. In case you were scratching your head. ;)

If you have any sort of instrument that will show watts of shore power being used, it should work on the line to the block heater. It uses 1000 watts, so your instrument should show somewhere in the neighborhood of 1000 watts.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks everyone for the help. I will check it out today since its not raining and let you all know what I found.
 

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Speeking of block heaters the cord on mine is junk. Can I get just the cord or is it a complete assembly?
Thanks
Andy
 

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Wolverine is the way to go, I do not even use my OEM block heater any longer unles it is going to be way below zero.
garyT
 

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Yes, you can just replace the cord. Or if the plug-in end is bad, you can just cut it off and wire on a Marinco Charger Inlet

Makes plugging in easy - Look Ma, only one hand! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/biggrin.gif
 

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heating the coolant is a LOT better then heating the oil. Heating the oil can burn the oil. Besides, warm oil doesn't help the engine start.

heating the coolant using a block heater means the HEAD will get warmer. Most of the water circulates up to the head.

Then when you crank the engine over to start it, the head is warm, top of the block is warm, vavles are already warm, and the truck will start more quickly.
 

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in the winter months here, it does get cold, however, i have mine setup on a timer, i plug it in at night, but the cord going outside doesnt kick the juice on till 2am, that lets it run for 3 1/2 hours before i fire it in the morning, i see no need to leave it plugged in all night, and it was a pita replacing the one on my dads old 91(i cant really rember for sure, but i think it was) and i dont feel the need to pay for the electrical usage, within the 3 1/2 hours its plugged in for, it will melt the snow on the hood, that usually tells me its working, and yes, my cord ends to get alittle warm.
 

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If it's your 2002 you're talking about, you already have a circulating coolant heater, the so-called block heater.

Look at the photo in my earlier post. If yours has that orange cord coming out of the base of the oil filter, you already have the block heater and the cord to plug it in. You just need to find the plug end of that cord behind the front bumper and plug it in.

If yours doesn't have that orange cord, then all you need to buy is the cord. The heating element is already there. The special cord for the block heater is higher than a cat's back, but it's a lot cheaper that buying a whole new block heater.
 

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is the 00' the same way
 

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I have the block heater and am currently using it with good results to minus 20 C. Bit when the temp drops to -30 C (-22 F) the truck takes for ever to warm up and throws alot of smoke. I am hesitant to through any load on it when it is smoking like that. Hope to get more heat in the engine with an aftermarket 1500W circulating heater.
 

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is the 00' the same way
Yes. '99-'03 7.3L all work the same way. The 6.0Ls and newer Ford diesels all have block heaters installed, but the electric cord was optional in most states. In the really cold states, such as North Dakota or Maine, the cord was standard. But in such tropical states as Massachusettes, Connecticut and Rhode Island, it was optional. ;)
 

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I have read somewhere-->That U need to wait at least 5 min before u start your truck, after unplugging your block heater? For the reason--->If you start your truck right after your unplug your block heater, there is good chance that there will be a splash of cold coolant enter the chamber and crack or break the heating element? Is there any truth to this?
 

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I have read somewhere-->That U need to wait at least 5 min before u start your truck, after unplugging your block heater? For the reason--->If you start your truck right after your unplug your block heater, there is good chance that there will be a splash of cold coolant enter the chamber and crack or break the heating element? Is there any truth to this?
If there was 99% of us on here would not have a working block heater.
 

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If you start your truck right after your unplug your block heater, there is good chance that there will be a splash of cold coolant enter the chamber and crack or break the heating element? Is there any truth to this?
Zero, nada, none. Complete nonsense. The heating element is in the header of the oil cooler. It heats the coolant in the oil cooler (heat exchanger), plus the coolant in the block above the oil cooler. There will be no splash of cold coolant until after a lot of warmer coolant has flowed past the heating element.

I've never heard of a block heater heating element cracking or breaking, so someone pulled that rumor out of their hiney.
 
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