The Diesel Stop banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,
I have been plagued by the famous leaky oil cooler for a couple of weeks now, my local Napa store is letting me down on their shipping as I have been waiting for a fair bit of time on my gaskets. I have found a temporary solution that can buy you some time, and it is pretty simple.
Tools required
- ratchet
- 1/2 inch short and deep drive socket
- 9/16 inch short and deep drive socket
There are 4 bolts on the front oil cooler header, they are 9/16. Simply tighten these bolts, they are accessible from underneath the vehicle from the front of the axle.
There are 4 more bolts on the rear oil cooler header and they are 1/2. they are accessible from underneath the vehicle behind the axle, simply tighten them.
I found that 2 bolts on the front header of my oil cooler had about 1/4 turns to tight, this has substantially decreased the amount of oil that the truck drips.
Can somebody chime in with the torque rating for the oil cooler?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,847 Posts
Take one of the bolts all of the way out, look at the head. If there are 3 lines lining up with the hex points it is a grade 5 bolt. If there are lines lining up with all of the hex points they are grade 8 bolts. Then google the torque settings for the correct grade 3/8, and 5/16 bolts. The ones that use a 9/16" socket are 3/8 bolts. The ones that use the 1/2" socket are 5/16 bolts. If you don't want to do all of that work, then just tighten them till they feel tight enough to hold, but before they break off. By the way a grade 2 bolt doesn't have any lines on it. There are standard torque settings for every bolt made. Not always the manufacturer's settings, but usually close enough to use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,876 Posts
Front header, 24 ft lbs.
Rear header, 14 ft lbs.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,847 Posts
Front header, 24 ft lbs.
Rear header, 14 ft lbs.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk
I would bet if you look it up according to standard bolt torque that spec. will be real close to it. Most manufacturers use standard bolt torque for their specs. wherever they can. Unless it's a cylinder head, or conn. rod, or main bearing where torque is critical for other reasons, the spec. is given to keep some gorilla from twisting the bolt off when tightening it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,876 Posts
Yep. That was just what I found in a manual via a quick Google search. I basically tighten everything by hand. Unless it's real important like head bolts, etc.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top